Boedie

I'm 16 and want to get into blacksmithing

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Hi my name is Boedie I'm 16 and have been trying to get into blacksmithing I've forged acouple things in a forge I made out of a old grill filled with dirt, if anyone has any tips or advice I'd be glad to hear it, i live just north of Atlanta GA

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Hi Boedie, Welcome. Contact the Alex Bealer Blacksmith Association,  alexbealer.org   They will be a great help to you. 

Al

 

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Welcome Boedie. You have found one of the greatest Blacksmithing resources there is, short of a Master Smith taking you under his/her wing.  

1. Read all you can here. Pretty much any question that you may have has already been answered. 

2. If you have a specific question about something after you read, then ask. 

3. Listen to what you're being told. The knowledge pool here is enormous and most have been doing it much longer than you (maybe even your parents) have been alive. Don't disrespect. 

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32 minutes ago, ThomasPowers said:

No problem with the forge; what are you using for fuel and air?

I use lump charcoal as the fuel and a leaf blower as the air source 

1 hour ago, PVF Al said:

Hi Boedie, Welcome. Contact the Alex Bealer Blacksmith Association,  alexbealer.org   They will be a great help to you. 

Al

 

OK thanks

1 hour ago, jwilson645 said:

Welcome Boedie. You have found one of the greatest Blacksmithing resources there is, short of a Master Smith taking you under his/her wing.  

1. Read all you can here. Pretty much any question that you may have has already been answered. 

2. If you have a specific question about something after you read, then ask. 

3. Listen to what you're being told. The knowledge pool here is enormous and most have been doing it much longer than you (maybe even your parents) have been alive. Don't disrespect. 

Will do

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Leaf blower puts out way too much air and is noisy; look into getting a smaller blower like off a car heater (12 volt) or an exhaust assist blower from a super efficient furnace junked by an HVAC company.

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Yes I figured that out I fixed that by putting a sock over the end of of the blower which slowed down the air flow quite a bit also I dont connect it directly to the pipe I have it positioned a good foot from the pipe and it works pretty well but Im sure the sock thing isnt very good for the motor

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Probably the same way I did. When the fire fleas started jumping, and I was just using a hairdryer. A suggestion that was given to me was to use a piece of 4 inch flex vent pipe.  You can bend it in loops which will slow down the flow of air but not hinder the motor as much as  with say the sock. It is aluminum but that shouldn't be an issue if your using a sock to control the air now. You should be able to find it at any of the big box hardware stores and if I remember right it's less than $10 for a 24inch long piece.

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2 hours ago, Panzer said:

Probably the same way I did. When the fire fleas started jumping, and I was just using a hairdryer. A suggestion that was given to me was to use a piece of 4 inch flex vent pipe.  You can bend it in loops which will slow down the flow of air but not hinder the motor as much as  with say the sock. It is aluminum but that shouldn't be an issue if your using a sock to control the air now. You should be able to find it at any of the big box hardware stores and if I remember right it's less than $10 for a 24inch long piece.

Ok thanks for the suggestion 

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Hey, Boedie;  welcome aboard! All of the advice above is very good, and  there's not much for me to add to it other than this: take every advantage to learn and practice your craft. Repetition is the mother of skill, and no one becomes a master overnight. 

That said, make sure to post pictures of your gear and your projects. We love watching people progress and get better!

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38 minutes ago, JHCC said:

Hey, Boedie;  welcome aboard! All of the advice above is very good, and  there's not much for me to add to it other than this: take every advantage to learn and practice your craft. Repetition is the mother of skill, and no one becomes a master overnight. 

That said, make sure to post pictures of your gear and your projects. We love watching people progress and get better!

I will thanks

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Welcome Boedi!

The best advice I can give you is to start making connections in your area for sources of steel and other gear.  The blower issue is the perfect way to get started.  Talk to everyone you can about the fact you are looking for a blower.  Visit a junkyard or HVAC shop and chat with people.  They will be impressed by a young guy wanting to work with his hands and might help you out.  Before you go anywhere, though, do your homework and know enough about what it is you are looking for.

By way of example, I've made connections with three different shops (and auto shop, a truck mechanic and a small machine repair place) and now have free access to all their scrap bins loaded with axles large and small...as well as a bunch of other stuff. HVAC has been less successful for me.  I have three people in the business and have yet to get a blower...but it will come.

So start making those connections and keep mashing metal.

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Welcome aboard Boedie, glad to have you. Blow driers can be found at garage, yard, etc. sales for a couple bucks. Don't worry too much about blocking the flow it actually lowers the work the motor has to do, won't hurt a thing. Even a $2.00 yard sale blow drier puts out WAY too much air for a charcoal forge for most work.

When you're looking for something the internet is only just so useful. The yellow pages and phone are a lot better hunting things down. If your best guess at who to call doesn't find someone who carries The Stuff! they'll probably know someone who does. Talking to people is a valuable skill.

 We love pictures. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Thanks For All The Tips, and you said you love pics so this is the first thing I've ever forged I just finished it this morning it's a knife made from rebar and btw the forge I made from the grill is dead my dad hit with the lawn mower and it fell and died so now I just have a hole in the ground lol.

IMG_20170429_121445_030.jpg

On April 28, 2017 at 9:40 PM, Lou L said:

Welcome Boedi!

The best advice I can give you is to start making connections in your area for sources of steel and other gear.  The blower issue is the perfect way to get started.  Talk to everyone you can about the fact you are looking for a blower.  Visit a junkyard or HVAC shop and chat with people.  They will be impressed by a young guy wanting to work with his hands and might help you out.  Before you go anywhere, though, do your homework and know enough about what it is you are looking for.

By way of example, I've made connections with three different shops (and auto shop, a truck mechanic and a small machine repair place) and now have free access to all their scrap bins loaded with axles large and small...as well as a bunch of other stuff. HVAC has been less successful for me.  I have three people in the business and have yet to get a blower...but it will come.

So start making those connections and keep mashing metal.

Thanks for the advice 

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Folks have been forging using just a hole in the ground for over 2000 years now.  I tell people that modern forges are just a method of moving that hole in the ground up to a convenient height for people not used to sitting and working on the ground.

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Check out the threads on JABOD forges. Cheap as they come. 

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Not that good; but solid fuel forges don't usually have the issues with heat production and retention that gas forges do. 

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All the clay needs do is keep the box, table top, etc. from getting burned. Don't worry about "refractory" for a solid fuel forge unless you go exotic on us and we'll let you know.

Frosty The Lucky.

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