eco redneck

New anvil . But not as I hoped

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I agree with the suggestion to use it as it is. 

I bought lots of tools in my life and keep on buying tools but generally speaking I buy the tools I need as I go. If I outgrow a tool I buy a better/bigger one. 

With anvils it seems there is a tendency to put the cart before the horse ... meaning, I'll start blacksmithing so I'll buy the biggest most valuable best ever anvil I possibly can to ... mm ... try my hand to make a hook? 

Nothing wrong with that of course but sometimes it may be better to wear out what you have, outgrow it, be familiar with it, know it's limitations, when it stops you from doing something, know what you need next. May be you don't need the best anvil, but a better forge? or a new set of hammers? A couple of post vise? A better smoke extraction system ... I dunno, sometimes we obsess too much over anvils. 

Oh, and as far as the comment in the previous page about old anvil vs new anvil. Yes, old is not necessarily better than new ... well with the exception of some violins and some wines :)

 

PS

Just saw your video. Don't feel bad about your new/old anvil. Best thing you can do is use it as it is. After all you hit the hot iron not the anvil with the hammer so a soft face will still do the job. 

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And as far as old violins ... today you can buy at a premium price, excellent Stradivarius and Guarneri copies made in China that are just as good without all the drawback of playing on a museum piece that falls apart at each weather change and at the price it costs to insure the real thing every year. 

And back to anvils, I have seen people pay more than what it costs a new Refflinghaus or a Kohlswa for older beaten up, sure very usable and antique and whatever. 

Each to his own I suppose... as far as wine ... well ... I wonder if someone has invented the instant ageing wine with just the right bouquet? :) May be I draw the line there with new versus old. 

Cognac Napoleon 100 years old anyone? 

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5 hours ago, Marc1 said:

And as far as old violins ... today you can buy at a premium price, excellent Stradivarius and Guarneri copies made in China that are just as good without all the drawback of playing on a museum piece that falls apart at each weather change and at the price it costs to insure the real thing every year. 

Excellent indeed, but not "just as good". There are physical changes that happen to the wood over time that affect its resonance  that cannot be duplicated. There is also the fact that one element of the superior performance of the old master instruments is the wood that was available to them at the time from areas that are now deforested. 

A few years ago, I had the pleasure of working on the donation to our Conservatory of the best Stradivarius copy I've ever seen.  It had been made in London at the end of the 19th century by the Voller Brothers, a trio of incredibly skilled craftsmen who were the go-to guys if you wanted a copy of an old master work. They made it for a London dealer named John Hart,  who had previously purchased the "Printemps"  Stradivarius and commissioned the brothers to make some exact copies (I know of at least two). It's a phenomenal work: precise in every detail, right down to the pattern of the grain on the back. Plays absolutely beautifully, too. But is it as good as the original? Not even close.

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This is another case of new, better than old. The new copies are way better than the old copies. The comments from the professional players are ... pretty close. :)

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Even of the face is very thin, as long as it is attached to the base it can be used to attach a new one.  A new face plate can be gapped off of the original 3/8" then starting from the center weld it 100% from underneath. 

Or,simply use it as the base to weld up with hard facing rods.

Now, the only question is, can you get another anvil in better shape for less money?

I have a 150# Vulcan from a school and the top is dinged up some. I plan on just planishing the surface instead of removing metal. Like with gunsmithing, many times you can push the metal back to where it was pushed from. 

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I am often suprised here by how hard people are on someone attempting to improve HIS tool. might have been a mistake maybe not, use it keep your eyes open for another in better shape. hopefully your new anvil since it is soft will help you develope hammer control. With your next one might be a good idea to seek advice before modifications, but it is your tool you get to make the decisions.

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Well with kids and grandkids I try to tell them to not touch the fire *before* they get burned and not afterwards.  It hurts to see people do something bad before you get a chance to warn them off.

It's their anvil they could even  cut it in slices and butter them for an art show!  (But I'd make fun of them for that too...)

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