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I Forge Iron

Another Oak & Steel End Table


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Over the last few days (last few years, if you count the 2 1/2 years for the oak to dry) I've been working on an end table.  The oak is 2" thick, the legs are 1 1/2" square tube, greatly distressed, the spreaders are 3/4" and 5/8" square, twisted and tapered.  The wraps are 1/4" rod, tapered on both ends.  Oak finish is Minwax Golden Oak and 2 coats of water-base poly.  Lots of propane, oxygen and wire-brush time.

 

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2 minutes ago, bubba682 said:

What finish is on the wood nice piece by the way.

And what finish is on the steel too?

The twist in the cross pieces is a nice variation from the standard. Great work.

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I usually build things in "two's" when I get busy; that way if things go badly I still have another to present as "finished".  These photos are from a second end table, just finished.  The oak for this and the previous table were 2' sections cut from some 10' planks.  They were going to be firewood, but I decided to make tables, instead.  I had to plane/sand out some moderate cupping, but it was worth it.  The finish on the oak is Minwax Golden Oak and 2 coats of water-base polyurethane, as mentioned in the OP.  The finish on the steel is 4" wire wheel on an angle grinder, brushing out almost all of the surface scale, then a coat of Rustoleum clear satin enamel.

The legs are "distressed" 1 1/2" box steel tube with 1/4" feet and a 1/4" plate fastening piece welded on top...1/4" X 1 1/2" lag screws hold things together.  The 1 1/2" legs look a bit too large to me - I'll try 1 1/4" tube next time.  Doing the distressing was interesting...heat up a section of tube, run it back and forth under the power hammer (light hits), slowly smashing the corners of the box, then bringing it back to square, then almost flattening it the other way.  Hollows and bulges appear and pieces of slag get smashed into the surface.  Finding some "distressed" tube in a scrap yard might be a better way to do this...thanks for all the great comments !!

 

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On ‎6‎/‎04‎/‎2017 at 2:23 AM, swedgemon said:

 The finish on the oak is Minwax Golden Oak and 2 coats of water-base polyurethane, as mentioned in the OP.  The finish on the steel is 4" wire wheel on an angle grinder, brushing out almost all of the surface scale, then a coat of Rustoleum clear satin enamel.

Thanks for that information  I do like that satin finish on the brushed steel.  I assumed that Rustoleum stuff was an American product, but I googled it anyway. To my surprise I found Rustoleum, Australia and went to the store search. There's a stockist in Atherton, a small town just 30km from me. So, I can see a can of Rustoleum clear satin enamel will be trialled soon.

Did you use brush-on or spray?

Thanks, swedgemon.

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In the US any finish that comes from a spray can is called a "rattle-can" finish...the metal finish was applied by rattle-can.    I have also used both "matt" and "satin" clear acrylic (enamel??) from Walmart with good results.  The polyurethane finish on the oak was applied by brush, lightly sanded with 220-grit sandpaper between coats.  Good luck, Aus !! 

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Thanks Swedge, I got onto a rattle-can of Rust-oleum today. Couldn't get satin but gloss should be OK. Cheaper than the White-Knight Rust Guard clear coat I usually apply too.

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5 hours ago, swedgemon said:

Let us see some photos of what you are putting together...we all need inspiration.

Nothing as complex as your table!

My time is spent mainly doing tourist stuff at my daily demos. School holidays at the moment so lots of family groups visiting. Involving the kids as much as possible. That's why I like a good quick-drying finishing product.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Alexandr, I admire your expertise in wood joinery and the mirror-like finish.  A question - you show the use of a heat gun; is that used to "re-flow" the finish coat?  And at what point are you using the heat - before complete drying, or after the Gold Glass has completely dried?  

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