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Your doing your research man, and its smart to do. I had quoted a 165 from TZ Rufna, and found they had a similar price.

Pros of buying a hammer direct from china: Less expensive, the two piece hammers can be indexed so the die is straight front and back, not just left and right hand angle, which would of been easier to stack on a angle next to my Bradleys that have the die in that position. I have not heard of a DOA hammer.

Cons: Could possibly incur extra customs fees, doesn't come with a motor, very limited warranty and parts support, does not have any of the upgrades or bugs worked out that are present on the Anyang, or the stroke of the new HS hammers.

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Thanks. That thread Chinese Hammer Differences is a good read.

On 3/16/2017 at 9:07 AM, CMS3900 said:

Your doing your research man, and its smart to do. I had quoted a 165 from TZ Rufna, and found they had a similar price.

This is not the new Anyang design. They have that new hammer patented and will not sell to an individual.

The hammer above has a 13 month warranty. But coming all the way from China I kind of expect the rear view mirror warranty. It does come with motor and all the belts. And everything to hook it up. I am getting a 40kg quote. I got a quote for a 150kg and a 75kg. These people are on the ball. Answering questions. Tempering dies to a certain Rockwell Hardness. Choice of die material used. Im thinking of getting a couple of holes drilled in my bottom dies. To set bolt on jigs. It will be a while before I pull the trigger. These quotes are good til July 15th.

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3 hours ago, crappiew said:

It does come with motor and all the belts. 

Chinese motors are highly variable in quality.  They're cheap as dirt in-country and SOP is often to just pay the cheapest price, test briefly, and use the 50-80% which actually work.  The many failures get tossed to the scrappers as simply part of the game.

So...Although the one you get might have the best motor ever made, I'd still always plan on needing to replace it when figuring actual machine cost on directly-shipped items.    

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I'm gonna roll the dice. Ive actually lost more money in a poker game. It stings for a while. But you will eventually get over it. As far as the quality of the motors. I' m willing to take a chance. To be honest I hate buying Chinese.

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I will. It's unbelievable how on the ball these Chinese fellas are. They answer e-mails promptly and they sincerely want your business. Ive got bids from several different places right now. . I'm going to do this in 2-3 months depending on funds. I will keep you posted.

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I bought a 40kg two piece with base and motor and 3 sets of dies directly from runfa 2 years ago. 4.4% import tax plus use tax plus broker fees. Do you know how to use a manual mill and lathe?

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So many choices, I have heard of TZ Runfa, but not these guys. The striker hammers were made by Shazxi no2 or something like that if I remember correctly. Last I heard of those they were superior to Anyangs but the USA distributor did not work out.

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The pictures of the finished hammers above were made by Anyang Forging Press Company (Per the factory).  They were purchased by a fellow in Europe and the factory thinks that he "re-badged" the 25kg. hammers.  The hammers that ST Anyang is selling is not made by Anyang Forging Press company.  If you go to the ST Anyang website, they have pictures of Anyang hammers in my shop in Alvord, TX.  They have other pictures of hammers that were in the Anyang factory.  ST Anyang I believe is a trading company.  You have to be very careful and know who you are buying from.  Anyang developed the key out design and several other improvements and they sold two of the 25 kg. hammers to a guy who the factory believes gave the information to another manufacturer to copy....  But understand the hammers are not the same.  There are other upgrades that have been made to the hammers (I am almost afraid to mention them for them trying to copy those upgrades also).  There are significant differences.  Anyang is by far the largest manufacturer of forging equipment and have been in business since 1956.  The other companies are small and relatively new startup's.  They do not have the technology, knowledge or staying power of the Anyang forging press company.  I personally would be very cautious of buying without visiting the factory.  I would get to know the people, touch and see first hand their manufacturing facility, make sure they had proper QC practices.  I would want to know that they will be here 10 years from now to supply parts and service.  Striker (Shan Xi) sold a lot of hammers up until 2008... then the distributor went out of business and the factory stopped making hammers.  If you have a failure, you have to machine the part locally  (very expensive) or scrap the machine.  I had a customer that purchased a 120 lb. Anyang hammer (not from me) about 15 years ago.  The operator drove the upper die key in too far and collided with the stuffing box and extended key hit the guide plates and forced them into the sealing rings, destroying the stuffing box.  They called me and within a week,  we had the assembly shipped from the factory and they were back up and running. 

Another point is I think there is value in having a local distributor to help and support you.  I get several calls per week from Anyang owners with questions.  I pretty much work 24 /7.  I answer my own phone, I know every nut and bolt on the hammer, I have been a blacksmith and customer of Anyang.  I used a 33, 88 and 165 lb hammer in my shop before I started distributing them.  I have seen more Anyang hammers in one week than most people will see in a lifetime.  I know how they work, if a customer has any question, there is a good chance I can answer it.  When you buy from a trading company, or even from the factory, it is almost impossible to get support and clear knowledgeable answers. 

A good distributor also carries inventory of hammers, dies, and spare parts.  I try to carry a full stock of each hammer size, all of the dies, and the normal spare parts for the hammers.  I also do not just import and re-sell the hammers.  Each hammer, I uncrate, add several USA made components to the oiling system.  On single phase motors, I install USA made motors, and USA electronics. I go over the hammer from top to bottom and then fully test the hammer for both power and control over the entire power band.  I spend between two and three days on each hammer before I will sell it to a customer.  Finally, you need to really understand all of the costs of importing hammers.  There are a series of fees beyond the normal duties, brokerage and transportation fees that can surprise you... just try as best you can to quantify the total cost. 

This post is already getting too long but several months ago, I got a call from a fellow in Canada who was beyond frustrated.  He told me that he bought an Anyang hammer and it was junk... the casting had flaws, the base was made from 1/4" steel plate, there were a lot of issues with running the hammer.   He thought the Anyang hammers were quality.   I asked him where he purchased the hammer and he said from the Anyang distributor in Canada.  I told him, there is no Anyang distributor in Canada.  I am the exclusive distributor for North America.  He was positive it was an Anyang hammer.  I asked that he send pictures of the hammer... when I saw the pictures, it was a clone.  The guy selling the hammer maybe thought he was buying from Anyang because the website of the manufacturer had pictures of some of my art work, the hammers and my shop... clearly they were trying to create the illusion that they were "Anyang" hammers.  I believe there are no shortcuts.  Working with the other distributors and the factory, we have made over 50 improvements to the Anyang hammers.  This only happens by knowing and using the hammers and spending time in the factory with the engineers, quality control, and factory workers.  I have traveled four times to the factory in the past 8 years.  I  have had the three top executives from Anyang travel to Texas and in my shop, discussing improvements.  It is difficult developing the relationships, trust, and knowledge exchange with email or skype.  It is these investments in time and effort that make for a better product. 

Unless you are buying from a known distributor and a known company, it is very much buyer beware.

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@James, very informative. You make some really great points.

I know you don't want to discuss the improvements for fear of copying, but if I were buying a hammer I would want to know as I'm a technical kind of person.

So without discussing what those are can you explain what the functionality difference of those improvements correlate to in using the machine?

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After about a year my hammer is still working fine.  It is not used much and purely a hobby machine so I still feel good about the purchase.  Having talked to other purchasers from that factory before buying made me feel better about taking the risk.

If I were relying on it to earn a living, I would for sure buy from James.  The value of support for something that pays the bills is worth way more than the lower price from another vendor.

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What's the difference in paying 4-5k for an imported machine. Or paying 4-10k for a rusted heap of junk here. I dont get it. I saw on FB a guy trying to sell a 250lb LG for 10k that looked like it was one step away from a trip to the scrap yard. Then there are tons of 50lb machines in the 3-6k range. That are in the same condition. 

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That 250 pound little giant has made 10,000 hammers for him. Crazy part is the asking prices lately, not long ago you would have to work hard to get 5k out of a 250 LG. Maybe my big self contained is worth 50k now......... lol. With the prices on used mechanical what they are now, it makes these imported hammers look even more appealing to the hobbyist and pro alike.

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Exactly. I would love to find one of those LG for a project. And thats also part of my plan. But I havent found one yet. So for now I went the imported route. 

 

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