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I just bought my father a "new" anvil for his birthday . I was wondering if anyone here could help me determine its age.  From what I've read, I  assume it's a Fisher because of the eagle emblem cast onto its right side.  It has "225" cast onto one of it's front feet.  I assume that is it's advertised weight.  I weighed it at 230 pounds.  "h65" is cast onto the back of it above the feet.  There are no other numbers, letters, or symbols appearing on it.  It does have mounting lugs with holes in them front and rear.  Any info would be much appreciated .   Thanks in advance .   Doug.

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Congrats on finding a nice Fisher anvil.  The 225 was the advertised weight.  However, most Fisher anvils were +/- a few lbs from their actual weight.

The H65 indicates it was made during the Crossley era of production(1962 - 1979).  It was cast in 1965.  Crossley took over production of Fisher anvils using all of the material and labor from Fisher.  Fisher had to close at the end of 1961 due to urban renewal and a new highway (Rt. 29) going through its land and buildings.  225 is an unusual size.  Most people either bought a 200 or 250.

I am always amazed that anvils in this condition keep turning up.

Could you post some photos of the other sides?

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Njanvilman, thanks for the info.  I can post some other views tomorrow .   I was under the impression that the later anvils did not have the eagle logo cast onto the side, rather, they used a paper lable.  This is why I consult the experts.  Would you have any idea of the value of this anvil?

Thanks again . 

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So great to see a Fisher in such immaculate condition.  It looks like it has never seen a hammer strike.

You can buy brand new anvils that are in similar condition, so you should value it "as new".  Anvils don't depreciate unless you beat them like a redheaded stepchild.  And because it's a Fisher anvil, something you can't get any more, that adds to the value.  It's not an antique, but it's still a rare thing.

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On 3/10/2017 at 8:49 PM, Timeswelding said:

Njanvilman, thanks for the info.  I can post some other views tomorrow .  

Fisher used the paper label mostly in the 1940's and 1950's.  But Crossley must have used them at some time too.  I found a few in the dirt in the heat treating room back in 1999 when I cleaned out the Crossley factory.  Lets see the logo.  If it is the style I hope, I will post the stamp that made it.  Found that there too.

If you are on Facebook, check out my Fisher & Norris Factory Museum Page for more information and pictures of Fisher products.IMG_20161230_155730135.thumb.jpg.9381b85b1d48e7b0606db37a810b5a85.jpg

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I got some more pictures of the anvil this morning.  Now it's time to build a stand.  Due to the dreaded Emerald Ash Borer beetle, we have an abundance of ash logs available , so ash it is.  Also, I checked the rebound with a 1 1/4" ball bearing and tape measure and it appears to be between 85 and 90%.  I don't think we can ask for any better than that.

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4 hours ago, VaughnT said:

So great to see a Fisher in such immaculate condition.  It looks like it has never seen a hammer strike.

You can buy brand new anvils that are in similar condition, so you should value it "as new".  Anvils don't depreciate unless you beat them like a redheaded stepchild.  And because it's a Fisher anvil, something you can't get any more, that adds to the value.  It's not an antique, but it's still a rare thing.

Kind words, but, not so true.  My camera angle may have been a bit too flattering for this anvil.  While it is in very nice shape, it has seen some abuse.

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The EAB killed the big ash tree in my front yard,  but I saved some of the trunk and split it into blanks for hammer handles. 

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Doug

But even with the chips, cut and obvious use marks, the anvil is till in nice shape.  

Everything I told you above is correct.  Crossley made, 1965.  If you and your Dad use it correctly, this anvil is just barely broken in.  It will last many more generations.

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Someone started to dress the edge. May be a good idea to continue that and give it a radius to avoid future chips

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The guy I bought it from dressed that corner.  I had considered continuing that radius the entire length of the right side.  It's pretty large.  Probably a 3/16" - 7/32" radius.  It would clean up nearly everything but the cut mark.  The left side is in much better condition , so I may sand a 3/32" or so radius on it.  Any thoughts on that plan?

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9 hours ago, Timeswelding said:

 My camera angle may have been a bit too flattering for this anvil.  While it is in very nice shape, it has seen some abuse.

Yea, the first pics made it look fantastic.  

The new pics, though, don't really diminish its value.  After you've used it for a year or three and have an idea what you'd like to forge most, you can radius the edges and make those chips disappear.  The amount of radius should vary on both sides, from sharp to not, so you can get the most service out of the anvil.  A lot of basic projects require working on the near side and far side, and you want matching radii in a lot of cases.  

Getting rid of the cut will be the most problematic and I don't recommend even trying to radius that much.

All told, an excellent piece of kit that will last another hundred years or more.  If I was selling it, I wouldn't even hesitate to charge $4/lb for the thing.  I'd probably start out at $6/lb and let someone talk me down.

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On 3/11/2017 at 4:49 PM, njanvilman said:

But even with the chips, cut and obvious use marks, the anvil is till in nice shape.  

Everything I told you above is correct.  Crossley made, 1965.  If you and your Dad use it correctly, this anvil is just barely broken in.  It will last many more generations.

I appreciate your info on the age and the history of the company.  I'm sure it will out last my dad, me, and probably my nephews .   Also, I checked out your Facebook page on the museum .   So much great info and pictures . 

On 3/11/2017 at 6:46 PM, VaughnT said:

Getting rid of the cut will be the most problematic and I don't recommend even trying to radius that much.

All told, an excellent piece of kit that will last another hundred years or more.  If I was selling it, I wouldn't even hesitate to charge $4/lb for the thing.  I'd probably start out at $6/lb and let someone talk me down.

I would never consider trying to remove the cut via an edge radius .   That would be a ton of material removal.  If I knew the alloy and heat treatment of the top plate I may be able to come up with an acceptable weld procedure for filling the cut.  I'm just not sure if I want to risk it.  As for the price, I guess I didn't do too bad   I paid $3 per pound.  I have always had the mindset that , when paying for a high end tool, I have never overpaid.  I have, however, paid what they are not yet worth.  Meaning that eventually they will be worth what I paid and I'll have them to enjoy in the meantime.

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24 minutes ago, Timeswelding said:

however, paid what they are not yet worth.

 Consider this phrase stolen......             Life is Good              Dave

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 TW, are you close by here? I'd like to see it in person.....                Dave

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The tool steel face and horn on Fisher anvils is made from W1, water hardening steel.  FYI.

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Hey thats a great looking anvi there, People who oxy cut on anvils should be beaten/clubed with a piece of wood mine had a bevel cut mostly along one side when I got it GRRRRRR That I have since repaired

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5 hours ago, Timeswelding said:

The guy I bought it from dressed that corner.  I had considered continuing that radius the entire length of the right side.  It's pretty large.  Probably a 3/16" - 7/32" radius.  It would clean up nearly everything but the cut mark.  The left side is in much better condition , so I may sand a 3/32" or so radius on it.  Any thoughts on that plan?

Depending on what you do on it,  may be worth having a radius that starts as it is now and goes down gradually to nothing at the other end. And have a smaller even radius on the other side. Radius is personal preference, but certainly necessary. It is crisp edges from factory that cause most chips, well that and carelessness. I sincerely don't know why manufacturers don't supply anvils with a small radius. it somehow conveys the concept that a perfectly straight crisp 90 degree edge is a requirement. 

By the way I like the off centre bolting down provision of that Fisher. Certain to get the OCD visitor into a cold sweat :)

PS

At risk of getting stoned, once you have your radius done, that cut will still be visible but much more shallow. Since it is narrow and everything else around it is rock solid, you can simply fill the cut with your MIG or stick welder. Two quick tacks and let it cool down. sand smooth and you will never know where it was. 

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I suggest the larger radii along the sweet spot where the heaviest work gets done and the smaller radii along the heel area where lighter work gets done.  As Marc1 mentions, no reason to have the same radii on both sides.  (and I agree that a lot of fuss and bother would have been avoided if they were shipped with a small radius to start!)

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Excellent!   My Blacker Powerhammer Fisher Anvil has quite crisp edges so I avoid it for certain tasks.

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