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Benton Frisse

Damascus Mouse Hawk

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Here's a small little mouse hawk recently finished. 15n20 and 1095, roughly 224 layers. Baked at 440F for about 2 hours. Will be hung on a hickory handle, ebony stained with pewter caps on both ends. This was just etched in vinegar, 50/50 cut with water and heated to boil then poured in a coffee container with the hawk and let sit for about 2 hours. Will probably go back for a second etch, I'm not entirely happy with this light etch. Thanks for looking! 

IMG_20170223_004226.jpg

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Nice work Benton. 

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That looks really nice. I really like that light etch. Makes it really nice when your eye notices the pattern.

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Looks awesome.  I just did my first real damascus and it was a chore.  I etched in 50/50 ferric chloride + vinegar mix, and it turned the entire thing pitch black so I had to sand back some.  I think a ferric and water mix would work better next time, or maybe vinegar and water like your mix.  

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NIce. The light etch makes the pattern a reward for people who look closely. I like features that reward me for careful examination. There was a fellow, Winter I think who made miniature buildings of different time periods, heck whole villages and towns. There was always a little mouse hidden somewhere on the piece. I LOVED searching for the mouse. I can't recall seeing any new work from him in a few years makes me wonder if he's still around. <sigh>

Anyway, I like the pattern for what I see in it Benton, well done.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Thanks, everyone! I have a small blade that is coming along from the same billet. Phew... full convex grinds are so tough. Tried Mr. Rich Hale's push stick method, it was still tough. 

I was really worried about blowing apart some layers while forging this mouse hawk, and I actually threw in an offcut of damascus to get a bit better spread out of the bit. It's hard to see in this picture, but if you look close enough you can see the distinct change in direction of the layers. 

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The more you work it at welding temperatures the better the welds tend to be.  My best example of this was I took a billet of bandsaw blade and pallet strapping, that had been folded a bunch of times and stood it on end and hammered it down into a disk to make a pizza cutter---the welds held being hammered the wrong way all the way down!

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Awesome, I was wondering if a Damascus hawk could be done! And you seem to have done a wonderful job! Well done!

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On 3/6/2017 at 1:26 PM, ThomasPowers said:

The more you work it at welding temperatures the better the welds tend to be.  My best example of this was I took a billet of bandsaw blade and pallet strapping, that had been folded a bunch of times and stood it on end and hammered it down into a disk to make a pizza cutter---the welds held being hammered the wrong way all the way down!

I would love to see this, Mr. Powers! Do you have any photos? 

 

10 hours ago, 1776 said:

Awesome, I was wondering if a Damascus hawk could be done! And you seem to have done a wonderful job! Well done!

Thanks, sir! 1776 was a good year, btw. 

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I think they were on my previous computer but I will hunt this weekend

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On 3/8/2017 at 7:31 AM, Benton Frisse said:

1776 was a good year, btw. 

It was a good year, yes it was.

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Lexington and Concord were in 1775 and the Treaty of Paris in 1783; but the Declaration was some heavy duty writing...

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