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Daswulf

second real knife, welded cable

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This is my second "real"  knife. it's from 1 1/4" gaswell crane cable forge welded. 10" overall length ( again, Thanks Bearded Guy for the gift of the cable and some insight into working it.) All I know is it spark tested as High carbon so this was an experiment that turned out well except for an inclusion that showed itself in the tempering ( a forge welding problem I'm guessing). Etched in 5% apple cider vinegar at +- 150 degrees F for a while (all I had), then sanded wet with 2000 grit. handle is oak, stained with chestnut stain and several applications of linseed oil with 1/8" brass pins. dunno what else to say but I'm happy with the end result. It feels great in my hand.

I learned some things along the way. #1 re-read about knife making step by step. #2 practice the forge welding. #3 have a plan for a knife shape/design.  #4 don't mess up good handle material like an idiot.( Poor lacewood.)  There's more..... I don't plan to specialize in knives but hey, they can be fun. I know I will make more here and there. what else? oh yeah have a belt grinder lol. Man, files and blocking sandpaper are killers. I did make a grinding jig for the bevels that I learned about from Steve's book but they might be a bit beefy compared to what they should be, but it helped. Yeah, I need to re-read that book before the next attempt.

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I would be very proud of that knife, Das. Got lots of that cable lying in the scrap. I look at it sometimes. It lies there still.

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That's a fine looking blade Das. The pattern shows up very well. I can't tell from the photos, did you insert a piece of copper tube in for the lanyard hole? If not, it might be a good way to protect the little chunk of wood behind the hole.

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6 hours ago, ausfire said:

I would be very proud of that knife, Das. Got lots of that cable lying in the scrap. I look at it sometimes. It lies there still.

Aus, it wasn't as bad welding the cable as I though it might be. Just have to do the right steps, keep it tight and fluxed. 

 

JME, I did not. That's a good point. I will be doing that tonight. 

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Thanks John, I've made some knife shaped objects before so I have a little experience with files, sandpaper and sanding blocks.  It's been a while since I've put this much into something that each next step had my cringing a little. 

Thanks C-1.  wanting to make blades was what got me interested in forging. I found that forging opened up so much more then a pin point interest for me, and now after having my setup for 3 years, I've made a second knife. 

Robert, now I have to make my first sheath. :) 

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Hey Das, as someone also getting into bladesmithing without a belt grinder, I've had some issue with the bevels as well. Could you post a picture of the jig that you used?

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I need to refresh on terminology a but but this helps in getting the line even. I mainly went by eye getting the bevel to match side to side. I did a bit per side so I could keep an eye on it and not go over. 

The jig is shown in Steve Sells book along with other great info. ( which I need to go back over. :) )

 

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Ok, I thought that was what you meant but I wasn't sure. I forgot to mention in my first post, very nice knife.

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Thanks. Yeah it really helps in making the knife look more professional. I even could have done better if I had left myself a little more meat for the blade pre HT. 

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Very pretty, indeed. Good job!

And yeah, the bevel jig is super easy to make and super useful. I even made a Q&D one from scrap pine, and it worked great. 

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Second real knife....?

Good classically proportioned design, full taper on the blade, cable welded blade....that is not beginners level, it is real advanced class....and You did excellent!

....actually" second-real-knife-makers" are not supposed to be that good....I am plastered:D

 

 

 

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Thanks JHCC, that is a simple and easy jig. And Very useful. 

Templehound, that is high praise for where I am at. Thank you kindly. I blame looking at your awesome designs. I'm a quick learner. Only took 3 years of reading and researching. :) Thank you for sharing your work and for all others that post good info here. 

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On 2/28/2017 at 10:54 AM, Daswulf said:

Now I have to make my first sheath. :) 

Isn't as hard as it may seem. Kydex or Leather?

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MDN, My favorite method of bevelling without a belt grinder...

Hammer your rough bevel.

Then, normalize, anneal, and all that good stuff...

Then, use the angle grinder with a regular grinding wheel to rough grind.

Then, use files to get it how you want it.

Finally, switch to sand paper, and don't stair step up until you have completely removed the previous marks.

With this method, you can make 'em look as nice as any.

 

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1 hour ago, 1776 said:

Isn't as hard as it may seem. Kydex or Leather?

Leather.  

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3 hours ago, Daswulf said:

Leather.  

Yeah. I've done those many times. Really easy. Just finished making one for my Natchez bowie. And you really don't need that many tools. I bought to many, lol. If you need help, don't hesitate to ask me all the questions you need.

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4 hours ago, C-1ToolSteel said:

MDN, My favorite method of bevelling without a belt grinder...

Hammer your rough bevel.

Then, normalize, anneal, and all that good stuff...

Then, use the angle grinder with a regular grinding wheel to rough grind.

Then, use files to get it how you want it.

Finally, switch to sand paper, and don't stair step up until you have completely removed the previous marks.

With this method, you can make 'em look as nice as any.

 

I've only made a couple of knives, so I'm sticking my neck out a bit here, but here goes:

A good intermediate step between regular grinding wheel and files is using sanding discs with a rubber backing pad in the angle grinder. You can get a much flatter and much smoother grind than with coarse grinding wheels alone. 

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Thanks 1776. I have a leather stitching awl somewhere lol. I'll have take a trip up to Tandy leather this weekend. I know I don't need much to make one. If it's like other things I'll probably buy extra just to save a trip later. 

JHCC, I read on here somewhere ( really can't recall the post) that using sand paper or grinding before using a file is bad for the file since the abrasive material can embed in the knife so when you move to the file it will wear on your file. Just something that stuck in my mind. I have better files and junky files, and start with the junkies ones when something is rough, or I had hit it with a grinder first. Just something to think about. 

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