Jonathan Snell

Musket trigger guard material

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Home made Sasaparilla, Mmmmmmmmmmm! Is there any question Frosty makes a good root beer? A good friend gave us a Frosty Root beer sign that's a giant bottle cap. It's hanging on the front wall of the house.

Agreed, outside a FEW basic things, the less a gvt. gets involved the better things work.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Setting your leaders adrift in an open boat in the Pacific is always an option….

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Is historical accuracy an issue? Pennsylvania type longrifles had a lot of brass trimmings but the OP is talking about a musket. I'd assume like a British Brown Bess or a French Charleville? Those firearms were very plain and utilitarian primarily intended for military issue. All trigger guards, buttplates and such were just wrought iron. Mild steel would make a good modern reproduction.

George

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Hi George, sorry for the delay.

No historical accuracy isn't an issue. We weren't even considering a full trigger mechanism.

The main aim this is to give my 13 year old a project to do with his dad, to show him its important to put thought into a process, follow it through and how cool it is to do stuff with his hands. He is loving blacksmithing and has nearly completed his first knife kit with a huge smile. Got to admit shaping a handle is not as easy as I thought it would be. Got given two leaf springs yesterday, on an island where some things are hard to come by, thats pretty cool. Our friend is a butcher and he's on the look out for some horn to make a powder horn, so hopefully one day his 'kit' that we build together will have a tomahawk/viking axe; powder horn, non-working musket and whaling harpoon and his knife.

....better the a high score on the play station!!

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16 hours ago, Jonathan Snell said:

Hi George, sorry for the delay.

No historical accuracy isn't an issue. We weren't even considering a full trigger mechanism.

The main aim this is to give my 13 year old a project to do with his dad, to show him its important to put thought into a process, follow it through and how cool it is to do stuff with his hands. He is loving blacksmithing and has nearly completed his first knife kit with a huge smile. Got to admit shaping a handle is not as easy as I thought it would be. Got given two leaf springs yesterday, on an island where some things are hard to come by, thats pretty cool. Our friend is a butcher and he's on the look out for some horn to make a powder horn, so hopefully one day his 'kit' that we build together will have a tomahawk/viking axe; powder horn, non-working musket and whaling harpoon and his knife.

Sounds great! Question I have is why not go ahead and make one that functions? Seems to me something non-firing is every bit as much work.

You might find this stuff interesting:

http://horseshoersforum.invisionzone.com/index.php?/forum/60-firearms/

16 hours ago, Jonathan Snell said:

....better the a high score on the play station!!

Amen to that:D

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1 hour ago, George Geist said:

Sounds great! Question I have is why not go ahead and make one that functions? Seems to me something non-firing is every bit as much work.

Norfolk Island is under Australian jurisdiction, which has extremely strict firearms regulations. I don't know what the specifics are for Norfolk, but Jonathan might find it a lot easier to make a non-functioning replica than to have to deal with the legal headache, especially since his goal is hammering rather than hunting.

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5 hours ago, JHCC said:

Norfolk Island is under Australian jurisdiction, which has extremely strict firearms regulations. I don't know what the specifics are for Norfolk, but Jonathan might find it a lot easier to make a non-functioning replica than to have to deal with the legal headache, especially since his goal is hammering rather than hunting.

Actually, that did in fact cross my mind but I  figured most places outside the State of New Jersey were pretty easy about civilian ownership of muzzleloading blackpowder muskets. If that's not the case, its at least comforting to know that what one builds themselves without serial numbers or paperwork doesn't really exist.

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Do a search for iron mounted long rifle/ flintlock. A lot of the southern and Virginia guns had iron trigger guards, butt plates and side plates, and yes you can forge them. Do a search on YouTube for Hershel House and maybe Ian Pratt. The American Longrifle (ALR) website too http://americanlongrifles.org/forum/index.php?PHPSESSID=6oem2v8n9f4tca9vutvifuopv2&board=2.0. Hope this helps.

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Yes, building a Southern Mt. or E. TN. style rifle is the way to go for a blacksmith project.

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A suggestion, if I may. IF you're looking for the brass color, and still want to forge the pieces, why not use steel to forge them, then burnish them with a brass wire wheel?

 

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Thanks everyone, really enjoying the suggestions and advice. I think everyone has us on the right track. This weekend we're hoping to get a scrap of Norfolk Island Pine and start a rough stock shape we can try and forge the plates to, all an exciting learning curve.

 

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