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littleblacksmith

Color of 15N20 when etched

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I am working on putting together a pattern welded steel billet, purely for looks, and wont be used on any edged item. I was planning on making it out of saw blades, and mild steel, and a few other things. I cut up all of my pieces of saw blades, mostly being circular saw blades for cutting wood, and some large blades used for cutting mild steel. To see what they would look like when etched, I would take one of them, dip it in pheric Chloride for about 15 seconds, remove it, and drop it into my neutralizing solution (Baking soda and water). I also took a piece of mild steel, and dropped it in the pheric Chloride. Now this piece I kinda forgot about, and so it sat in it for about 30 minutes. When I removed it from the neutralizing solution later, it was a light gray, almost white color. The saw blades were mostly different shades of dark grey. Now, the reason I am telling ya'll this, is because I thought that 15n20 etches a bright grey/white? In the research I did, I found that saw blades are sometimes made from 15N20. It was hard to tell though if they were talking about band saw blades or circular saw blades, if it makes a difference. Also, I wasn't sure if the color I got had anything to do with how long I left it in, because I did leave it in substantially longer than I did the saw blades. Also, I read that 1084 etches dark, and the more carbon there is, the darker it is. So, that leads me to believe that the saw blades are not 15n20, but a plain carbon steel, and that since the mild steel is a low carbon steel, it is a lighter color?

It's just a lot of muddy water for me that needs clearing up.

While I'm at it, I have a bunch of other steel that I could use for this pattern welded steel, and like I said earlier, since I'm not using this for any edged item, it doesn't need to be a high carbon blade type steel billet. Some of the items I have are- leaf spring, steel cable, more saw blades, lawn mower blades, coil spring, horse shoes, files/rasps, mild steel, and probably some other stuff that I'm forgetting. If any of those steels would have a better contrast than the circular saw blades and mild steel, than please let me know.

Also, ya'll are probably thinking "why don't you just get some know steel, and make your life easier?" well, because I have to get this done pretty soon, and so I don't have the time to wait for the steel to ship here, and there is no one local who I can get it from.

Thanks and sorry for all of this in advance. I realize that I probably didn't word it the best. I can get pictures if ya'll would like.

                                                                                                                                 Littleblacksmith

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Why don't you  make up a small billet and weld it up then grind a bevel on one end and etch it . Then you can see  what it contrast it has. 

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First thing to clear up:  why would you assume that all saw blades were made from the same alloy?

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Weld up some nickels with steel for maximum contrast.

If the carbon content makes a contrast, the files are high carbon, so use mild with them. The manufacturers of concrete blades that I contacted  use 4140 cores, so blades are a real crap shoot. If you are using 7.25" Skil saw blades they really will be considering that they are trying to use the least expensive option to braze carbide teeth onto. 

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you use much copper in your billets?

"A nickel, in American usage, is a five-cent coin struck by the United States Mint. Composed of 75% copper and 25% nickel," Wiki

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I suck at forge welding so I don't do billets. Even so, being that a nickel is not a laminate like a quarter is I would think that it would weld up. 

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Except that it will melt and splash all over at forge welding temps for steel---75% copper!  should be called a "nickel bronze"!

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On ‎1‎/‎31‎/‎2017 at 8:47 PM, littleblacksmith said:

In the research I did, I found that saw blades are sometimes made from 15N20.

 

10 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

First thing to clear up:  why would you assume that all saw blades were made from the same alloy?

It was more of me hoping, that out of the bunch I would get some that were 15N20.

So, got some band saw blades tonight. Think I should mix them with the saw blades? Or is there something else that has a better contrast you think? tomorrow I will do a test etch on them to see what color they etch.

                                                                                                                              Littleblacksmith

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My standard fooling around billet is alternating bandsaw blade and pallet strapping and I quench test the pallet strapping to get the higher C versions,  Good differentiation and starting with 25 pieces 1 Z fold gets you 75 and 2 gets you 225 and 3 gets you 675.  Though I generally just go with a simple fold over and 25,50,100,200,400.  Learning to forgeweld such thin stock is a skill worth having!

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