Andrew Leigh

Extending the "depth" of an anvil

13 posts in this topic

Hi,

I am busy completing a square post anvil that when machined should end up with a face a little under 6x6" and will be 10" high.

As this anvil will be mounted in a stand to raise the work surface to the appropriate height I have been musing on bolting a piece of say 4" round bar to the anvil base as a location lug to stop the anvil from moving. That then got me thinking, what if I was to extend that 4" bar to say 20" or so long. Would that significantly alter the performance of my anvil or is the cost not worth it.

If that is a good option would the bar need to be welded to the anvil to "mechanically" couple the two?

Regards

   

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Honestly, if I had the choice, I would build a wooden stand for the 6x6" and use that, and then also mount the 4" round bar upright to use as a secondary anvil. I don't know how much length you have of that, but if you have more than 20", I say use the whole thing. The more cohesive mass under your hammer, the better. If you have a very long piece of 4" round, why not bury part of it, and concrete it into the ground to keep it from wiggling? Then you can have two anvils for different purposes. 

 

Related, I have often wondered about making an axle anvil, with the top of it domed to the same circumference as a good rounding hammer, and using those two together to draw out stock more effeciently. Perhaps one day! 

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30 minutes ago, Ridgewayforge said:

Honestly, if I had the choice, I would build a wooden stand for the 6x6" and use that, and then also mount the 4" round bar upright to use as a secondary anvil.

Very good suggestion. The 6" x 6" x 10" block will have a mass of ~100 lbs; a ~29" length of 4" dia. round will have about the same mass, but better rebound because of the greater mass directly under the hammer blow.

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Bed it down in some sand. Wedges it in and keeps it in place and kills any ring. Then enjoy!

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On 1/30/2017 at 10:59 AM, JHCC said:

 The 6" x 6" x 10" block will have a mass of ~100 lbs;

So mass is measured in pounds?  Has something changed? :)

It bugs me a bit when people refer to weight in kgs as well.

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You want to slug it out?

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1 hour ago, beech said:

So mass is measured in pounds?  

I beg your pardon; that should be "a little less than three and three-quarter stone".

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Much can be said about the mass or weight of an anvil, usually the heavier the better for blacksmithing, up to a point. London pattern anvils 100 to 300 pounds are good, as the majority of the anvil is under the impact of the hammer. They manufactured a bunch of them in that weight range to be both useful and affordable. Bragging rights not considered, anvils weighing 400, 500, 600, and 700 pounds are generally found in industrial shops for industrial use. A different tool for a different type application.

RR anvils are suggested to be used on end so the majority of the anvil is under the impact area of the hammer. You can not make a 10 pound anvil into a 310 pound anvil by putting a 10 pound anvil on a 300 pound stand. 

Your 100 pound block of steel will allow you to do many things. Securing it to a sturdy stand will make it convent for you to use. If you still have questions, make enough product on the block anvil to allow you to  purchase another anvil of your choice. Keep the block anvil while you learn to use the new (to you) anvil. It will take a while to learn how to make it work for you in your shop doing the things you do. 

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On 2/6/2017 at 6:02 PM, ThomasPowers said:

You want to slug it out?

Now now, we don't want anyone to throw any punches- sure they make slugs, but if you catch my drift, I just don't want anyone upset

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31 minutes ago, Ridgewayforge said:

Now now, we don't want anyone to throw any punches- sure they make slugs, but if you catch my drift, I just don't want anyone upset

I'm not sure you're giving us the hole story.

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On 2017-02-06 at 5:59 PM, beech said:

So mass is measured in pounds?  Has something changed? :)

It bugs me a bit when people refer to weight in kgs as well.

Sorry I do not understand. I believed that a pound is approximately 0.45 kg both being dimensions for mass.

Then for practical reasons we calibrate our scales (which we use for weighing) in kgs (or pounds) rather than Newtons since we usually use them to determine mass. We do not buy a Newton of potatos we buy a Kg or a pound. A Newton of potatoes is probably a ton of new potatoes or??? 

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On ‎2‎/‎7‎/‎2017 at 2:26 PM, Ridgewayforge said:

Now now, we don't want anyone to throw any punches- sure they make slugs, but if you catch my drift, I just don't want anyone upset

guys, guys, try not to loos your temper again.

                                                                                                                          Littleblacksmith

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