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build an anvil handcrafted with recycled materials


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Thanks for your suggestions. in fact I happened to build two rudimentary swords with truck leaf spring sheet ford transit, if you make me see photos Japanese or French anvil cheap you would do me great pleasure, anvils eastern europe are good? romania russia poland? addresses you have, in my part I found no anvils blacksmith blacksmith but also an inaccessible a1000 € price with suggestions

enclumes forgeron

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On 1/26/2017 at 8:21 AM, Zanshin said:

Ciao Angiolino, è un po' difficile capire quello che scrivi per via dell'inglese... (senza intendere nessun vilipendio, per carità) se vuoi scrivere in Italiano posso tradurre io per te. Comunque, quello che twntano di dirti è che devi star lontano da pezzi non solidi come la putrella, il binario ecc. Se trovi blocchi massello anche non enormi, 40 o 50 kg bastano, pezzi di rimanenza da tornitori, fonderie ecc va benissimo le forche del muletto vanno benissimo ma le devi usare verticalmente altrimenti la flessione è troppa e fai lavoro doppio.

Se vuoi, su ebay trovi un fornitore che ti spedisce una incudine decente e le spese di spedizione sono abbordabilissime ed il prezzo dell'incudine è molto buono. Son fatte in cina ma è c45 ottimo acciaio per iniziare. Io ne presi una ed ha un rimbalzo ottimo, ancora la usiamo. Se vuoi ti do il nome del venditore in privato, non so se si possa pubblicamente. Fammi sapere!

Fra

 

I tried that before with zero result. I am afraid that Angiolino may be located in Italy but does not seem to converse in Italian. My guess ... eastern europe, Romania?

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yes thank you, I live in a rural suburb, it is for me difficult to find materials and tools, what do you think of hammers and anvils to forge Japanese katanas, how they are made and designed'd photos thanks again

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47 minutes ago, angiolino said:

I live in a rural suburb

Are there any farms nearby? You can use an axle- mount it upright, as long as the face of the axle is bigger than the hammer. And you can find hammers in any tool or hardware store. Japanese hammers and anvils are simple. Just find a block of steel for the anvil. For the hammer, punch a hole at one end of the stock, and then handle it and dress the face. Don't make things too complicated for yourself. Blacksmithing is simple. We are trying to help you in any way possible.

 

I did some searches on kijiji, and found a few anvils for good prices; 40kg for 150Euros. Are you able to drive, or train to other locations to buy anvils? Without knowing where you are in Italy, it can be tougher to help you find a suitable anvil or tools

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I could recover from big junkyard mechanic or maybe industrial machinery, new anvil is fine € 150 as the price, but where I am there are no department stores of materials and industrial equipment, only small general store, buy it used would I travel a lot, it would cost a lot of fuel vehicle than anvil price, thanks anyway valuable advice to the next

 

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Without giving us more information as to your location and things avaliable to you, its hard for us to help you- The rail anvil is better if it is stood upright, so that the most mass is under the hammer- and as to a hammer, why do you need a cutlers or dog-faced hammer? If your area is so starved for tools that you cannot find one that you want, you can at least start with a claw hammer- Its not the best, but at this point I think the best thing to do is to make do with what you can find until you can improve things. 

 

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I found a big sheet steel strip such a big plate, using hammers and traditional clubs, I would just create a tripod or a pedestal to place this iron plate, I manage with what little I have and that I can recover around thanks again for the right advice, if you would have higher suggestions please contact me thank you again

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In most cases welding a plate on to fail is going backwards. Rail is 8-9 point manganise steel, so already a high carbon tool steel.

Any one arguing about rail on end being useless, look at the Viking anvils in museum collections, a 1 1/2"X 3" face and a 1-1/2 to 2# hammer would be pretty nice. A 4" block would be loved. 

A peice of 3-4" plate would great on edge, you can carve shapes in the edge as well. Drops from define rounds are good as well, if you can find a 3-4" thick drop from cuting 2' rounds you now have a double horn post anvil

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Mass & Hammer Blows.png

This describes in rudimentary figures why you want a plate on end, so that More Mass is Under the Hammer. 

It is the same principle as to why it is easier to draw out rather than to upset. 

Mass & Hammer Blows 2.png

Fig. 3 shows why a rail stood the way a train would run on it isn't ideal. I realize that these drawing are simple, but they might help understand the concepts of why Mass under the Hammer is GOOD! 

 

It sounds like you are doing fine. Blacksmithing is Big Rock (anvil) Little Rock on Sticks (Hammer) and Fire, and Metal. 

 

 

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A Swage Block is a cast iron block with many shapes, depressions or holes in it, used to form hot metal. Its not used for forging, but for things like punching holes, setting shoulders on hardy tools, bending stock, dishing sheet metal to make ladles and spoons. If you don't have an anvil yet, don't bother getting a swage block. It is cast iron, so shouldn't be used for general forging. 

What do you have in your shop already? 

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the workshop was the origin of his grandfather, he inherited all glia gear my cousin, who gave them away for a plate of beans, a pittance, I use an iron plate cutout big heavy a plate resting on two sawhorses in iron, but it is not heat-treated steel, with a hammer I can beat with heavy mace is not effective and efficiene, so I try anvil or similar tool, thanks for clarification would have other suggestions?

Lavorazione-metalli-Lombardia-toscana.jp

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Go looking for a round or square section drop, 3-6" across and a foot to a foot and a half long. A 3-4" plate a foot or more on a side would work well to. 

As  mentioned, heavy equipment/tractor axle, forklift tine, rail section, rail car axle, rail car cuppler (a broken one is still massive) heck a peice of an old Sherman or panzer tank front slope, lol. 

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would you have photos or drawings with measures to take cues, like human ingenuity like the items recovered and reused for other purposes, is a form of art, do not you recycle repurpose reuse in these times of crisis in my opinion is a great resource, you do not find, pieces of tanks in my area and find none, perhaps pieces of trucks or earth moving machinery moo i can try thanks again for next allla tipsaa20a420ce8f559cb5cb132a2cbddb37.jpg

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angiolino   please check https://www.leboncoin.fr/annonces/offres/ile_de_france/occasions/?f=a&th=1&q=enclume

you asked about eastern Europe - forget about Romania - few anvils survived, bad condition, very high prices. I'm checking the ads from time to time - there are the same anvils for sale for years now. the average price is about 400euros. for that price I could buy from France something awesome and get shipped here, in Romania. I already bought a very nice old "pig" anvil from France, a ~150kg one, with a nice oak stump, for 150euros. there are better anvils, for better prices, but that anvil was close to a friend who moved to Romania, so it was easy to retrieve. just a weak ago I saw a double horned anvil in a as new condition (except a thin coat of rust), 1m long, which means over 200kilos for that kind of anvil, for the price of 60euros.

 

for example, today's anvils, under 200 euros: https://www.leboncoin.fr/bricolage/1088004059.htm?ca=12_s

 

https://www.leboncoin.fr/bricolage/1087909809.htm?ca=12_s

 

something very old, colectible: https://www.leboncoin.fr/bricolage/1087805915.htm?ca=12_s

 

https://www.leboncoin.fr/outillage_materiaux_2nd_oeuvre/1087768834.htm?ca=12_s

 

https://www.leboncoin.fr/outillage_materiaux_2nd_oeuvre/1087743402.htm?ca=12_s

 

https://www.leboncoin.fr/autres/1087711215.htm?ca=12_s

 

 

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The picture you show is a track plate turned upside down (nailed to the wooden sleepers that the rail sits on) they are medium carbon, and make reasonable stake plates for 7/8" hardies and such. Think 7/8" slice of rail with the flange cut off or a temp veining tool made from a spike

One variant of the rail anvil being used to cold shape shoes

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thanks for the right specific suggestion that I should not use the anvil blacksmith for work but rather by smith forging the tip of a chisel, shaping the nail of a lever to pry, cold straightening shape by hammering metal bars etc. thanks the idea, however, if others variants I invite you to sottopormeli thanks again to the next compared ideas and sugggerimenti thanksanvil-4.jpeg

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I think you might be misinterpreting what Charles Stevens is saying. Look at how his rail anvil is oriented. Not like a train would run on it. You need it to be connected with the ground, with the most mass possible under what you are hammering. If you have a 25 mm square post, about waist height- That is better than a 3 meter rail mounted on the saw horse that you have in the first picture. 

 

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The rail, flange up as a saw horse is good for sheet work, and as a welding stand. 

Mid you notice, the rail I have shone is a multi tool. The end that is up in the picture has a fuller grount into the web, a pritchel hole cross drilled, a pair of bending forks, a anvil face. If you flip it end for end you will find it has a cut off grount into the web, a round and square horn cut into the flange, another pritchel hole and an anvil face. If layed down like a train rail you find a shallow digit tord one end to aid in straitening and down one side 1" marks (the duvet, and marks stolen from Steve sells sword straitening anvil) not to mention the orher shapes the rail came with. Carving a London patern out of a rail is a PITA. 

Pardon the rust, she is not my primary anvil. 

 

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Pardon the rust, she is not my primary anvil. 

 

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