littleblacksmith

What did you do in the shop today?

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I can vouch it works!  My anvil "find" came through a guy who had been buying some stuff from me.  I talked with him, as I had everyone I met or knew and he called one day to say he'd seen one advertised on Facebook.  I'm not on any social media, but he got me in touch with the seller.  Deal made!

Today I started a search for a 220v extension cord for my new (to me) welder.  Asked all over the gym today when I was there and one of my friends said he has two that he used with his RV...........which he no longer has.  They were both for 50 amp, so I'm assuming they are 6 gauge wiring.  Said I could have-em for nothing.  Ca-ching!  TPAAAT in action.

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Just keep at it.  What you want will come to you if you really need it, unless you get something better. Then you will find 3 of what you wanted in the next week.

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Finally got to using the new forge. It is nice. Baffle doors will be made tonight. Ran out of propane and time.

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5 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

he had found no evidence of case hardening or intentionally using higher carbon materials for the arrow heads.

I do not know if this is true or not but i heard that back then they did not use "better" (for lack of a different word) metals for arrow heads becuase they were "fire and forget". Not going to spend $10 on something to use once when the $1 one will get the job done.

 

18 hours ago, Irondragon Forge & Clay said:

You might want to look at this thread.

Thanks quite the informative link. 

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I think the real question was "Would they work to penetrate armour?  There have been a number of tests of greater and lesser validity on this topic and the arguments are still going on last I read.

As far as cheapness: some smithies paid a tax in arrow heads for the right to work in certain locations and so not a lot of inducement to go further than "Apprentice, make 3000 arrow heads!"  (ISTR documentation on this in a 1929 British Wrought Iron  book I have. I'll see if I get a chance to dig in it tonight.)

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51 minutes ago, blacksmith-450 said:

 

Relax a little... B)

Just don’t get hammered!

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1 hour ago, ThomasPowers said:

some smithies paid a tax in arrow heads for the right to work in certain locations and so not a lot of inducement to go further than "Apprentice, make 3000 arrow heads!" 

Yeah, if i aint making something off them i am just going to use what scrap i have around the shop. 

I am going with medieval Europe here, but i was always under the impression that the bodkin used did not "pierce" the armor but was made to separate the links in chain mail.  So that is one reason that i can see that something that is not hardened would work. 

As a side note, i learned or was told many years ago that when armor got to the point that plate could stop an arrow was about the same time guns were invented. Humans have been in an arms race since our first ancestor smacked another with a stick. 

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Depends if you mean the long skinny bodkin or the short stout bodkin; different designs for different use cases. 

I've done some "irish nails" from small trashed socket chisels before the 1/4" chisels tend to get damaged and discarded.  Held them on the light javelin shafts using pine tar.  Worked great---we used them as stab sticks cleaning up our area at a major event we participated in.  If a head got loose you could rotate the socket over a candle flame and it would rebed.

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I was always under the impression that both were meant to do that, but the shorter stouter one would pierce plate. I admit  am not well schooled on arms and armor over the centuries only little tid bits i pick up here and there. One thing  i do know now is that these things are a pain to make. Keeping them straight is a real bear. 

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It isn't the shop but I figured someone may appreciate it.

Lanced the moldboard pivot pins on a 12M3 grader. Bronze adhered to the pins, locked them up. 

The "adult sparkler" burns at roughly 10,000°F and will blow through a 4140 pin like it's putty. 

Once 3/4 through the pin, let cool and start beating with a 20lb sledge. 

Shin-height side-to-side isn't quite analogous to striking... SORE... 

 

 

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Finished a pair of offset blade tongs today. My second pair of tongs I’ve made. First rivet, forged down from parent stock. Great learning experience. Super stoked with how they turned out. 

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Good Morning,

They look good. A suggestion would be to leave more material closer to the hinge point. If you imagine the effort on the Tong Reins (both sides of the pivot) when you are pinching the end of the handles, you will understand what I am suggesting. Not thicker in the width, start a gradual taper at the hinge area boss and work it in a long taper toward about half the length of the rein. Same with the jaws, gradual taper to the bits.

I am not being negative critical, please take it as a positive suggestion.

Neil

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Neil,

I always take info as an opportunity for improvement. Thanks for taking the time to give it. 

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I made two outdoor fire pokers, and the hooks to hang them on, this weekend, that I had a 2 sales for. When I finished them I showed them to my wife and she took one to give to a friend of hers for a birthday present. I told her I had it sold already and she said "not this one, the next one you make is for you to sale" so back to the forge this weekend to try to get caught up. This is the second time she's done this to me, I told her I'm going to quit showing her my work.

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I didn't do any actual forging today, but I did have an interesting conversation by text message with a good friend who wants to order some custom candelabra. He's a Russian Orthodox priest in Alaska whom I know from when he was studying at the seminary where I used to work; his wife (the Orthodox have married priests) used to babysit my kids. It's a fun project and not too complicated, and I lowballed the price a bit because the candelabra are for his church and he'll be paying out of his own pocket. Our last exchange was him saying, "Let me talk to the boss and confirm." and me replying, "Right you are. Just let her know that's the 'Clergy that just moved to Alaska from Colorado whom I've known for over a decade and whom I love like a brother even though our political views are somewhat different' discount. I don't give that to just anybody."

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Loaded up 4 postvises and an anvil stand last night. Trying to spread the load for the demo/sale I'm doing Saturday.  Helps my back.

Les, just think of it as "payment" for the time not spent on her.  Having your spouse think that it's a good thing for you to spend time in the shop can really help you with your hobby!  (I mean when your spouse says "It's getting close to time to buy another vehicle; but I think you should spend the money saved for 3 powerhammers and a heap of smithing stuff!"  you know you are doing it right!)

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First post in years i would guess..

made myself a little J-hook to hang my work headset on. A little down on myself for punching the hole off center. Oh well...

 

 

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Think of breaking the edges so they won't be so sharp.  I call it "octagonalization" and I teach a lot of college kids I mention that it is not a regular octagon but one with 4 major and 4 minor sides.  I do it by heating and placing the work piece on its corner and tapping it from end, rotate 90 deg and repeat.  Do this before the counter bend or curving the hook. (For a typical hook I can octagonalize in one heat, students tend to need more.) You only have to hammer on two sides as Newton at the anvil will hammer the other two---so if you trying for a hammered look, choose the sides that will show!

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I take it as a complement on my work when she does it and it forces me to do another one and get in some much needed practice.

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