littleblacksmith

What did you do in the shop today?

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Dr. said mine was too tight after 30+ yrs. on my finger, trouble was the wife was there when he said it. I took the ring off and handed it to her and asked the Dr. what the problem was. I can still wear the old one 10 yrs later, ain’t saying what that trip cost 

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Now you’re rolling, just don’t start rocking! Don’t forget that’s a top heavy machine when you move it 

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Mr. Les L.,

Cogently stated, and I quote,

" … I can still wear the old one 10 yrs later, ain’t saying what that trip cost". 

The SLAG says,

It may have cost plenty.

We must remember that the good doctor is, probably,   still paying off his student loans with the goal of paying them, in full,  before he dies..

Just sayyin'.

SLAG.

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My Dad didn't wear his wedding ring until he retired. Being an aircraft mechanic in the Air Force, and a civil service machinist at a Navy yard meant it was a work hazard.

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What a popular topic this has been. I wonder if young 'littleblacksmith' would have thought his initial post would receive over 10,000 replies and generate nearly half a million views! Just sayin'.

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13 hours ago, BIGGUNDOCTOR said:

My Dad didn't wear his wedding ring until he retired.

Same with my old man, i also learnt early : no rings in the shop. 

My mom went and got him  a new wedding ring this year for their anniversary. He didnt wear the old one but always carried it on his keychain. After 50 years it was pretty beat up. 

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16 hours ago, SLAG said:

We must remember that the good doctor is, probably,   still paying off his student loans with the goal of paying them, in full,  before he dies..

Or his new boat.

I had to take my mokume gane wedding ring off for a week+, I'd developed a raw spot under it and had to let it heal. While I had it off I did what I usually do with metal art, I took a really close look at it. One way I "look" at metal is braille and this time I wanted to make sure it hadn't developed a burr or some such rough spot on the inside. While brailling it I discovered it's no longer round but has a number of small dents. 

I know I should but I never remember to take it off in the shop. So far I haven't crushed it or otherwise trapped my finger. Maybe I'll remember now I know how many times I've hit or pinned it hard enough to deform and I'd REALLY hate to have to cut it off. Our rings were made for us by Jim Binion and are as one of a kind as it gets.

Frosty The Lucky.

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conrad, those are good looking leaves. Leaves are still tricky for me. I don't know why. But very nice work. 

I lost my wedding band a couple of years ago. I think it's somewhere between the goat pen and the rabbit runs. I looked hard and heavy everywhere and finally gave up. Maybe it will surface. My Dad had lost his and I happened to find it in the backyard several years ago. I had no idea he had even lost it

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You should be able to rent a metal detector and there's no telling what goodies you might find in an old farm yard. Precious metals give a different return than: iron, brass, aluminum, etc. practice by putting different metals under a rug and you'll learn to recognize the different returns in a while. Have Tommie put the exemplars under the rug, blind testing teaches this kind of thing much better. Ever douse? 

Does Tommie know you look at and discuss other men's leaves in public? :o 

Frosty The Lucky.

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I have never been married, but my love is definitely my other half. 

2 hours ago, CrazyGoatLady said:

somewhere between the goat pen and the rabbit runs.

Maybe a metal detector might help. Be fun to see how nature wore it for you all these years.

 

2 hours ago, Frosty said:

So far I haven't crushed it or otherwise trapped my finger.

Back in my fishing days one of the methods we used was a tide net (tekken). A strategically placed gill net to trap fish following the tides. Frowned upon nowadays but part of my fisherman heritage. Anyway, one morning while checking the net about 5’ under water, a bracelet my childhood friend gave me got caught in the  net and a short bout of panic set in. Was able to calm myself and cut the net. Never again will I have danglies hanging about when working. Something about being just below the surface knowing lifesaving air is RIGHT THERE is quite terrifying.

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Frosty, you reminded me that I have an old metal detector. I should get it out and see if it works. The ring is tungsten. And no, I have never doused. Isn't that called water witching also? When we moved here, there was a lot of junk everywhere that we removed. All kinds of things used to just wash up out of the ground after a good rain. Once I found an intact kids fishing pole. The chickens have dug up hardware staples, spoons and some unidentified objects. We found an old steak knife in the chicken tractor recently. We joked about what they were planning on doing with it!

 Discussing other men's leaves... I better tell him so he doesn't find out and decide to 'leaf' me, huh? ;)

671jungle, I remember reading in Ripley's Believe It Or Not when I was a kid about a woman who had lost her ring down the sink. Months later, she bought a fish at the supermarket for dinner and when she cut it open, she found her ring inside that fish. How cool is that? 

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Hmmm, no idea what kind of return tungsten gives, be fun to see/hear but I don't have a detector.

Dowsing, witching isn't a big deal, I use coat hangers bent 90* at one end. The biggest trick is holding them level and walking smoothly so they can swing on their own. I got pretty good when I worked for a pipe thawing outfit. Finding plastic under a carpet or rug was a great way to win bar bets, it's a bummer I never was much for drinking, 2 . . . 3 MAX is my limit at a party. Don't know how it works but dowsing works amazingly well. 

I have my own hypotheses for what it's worth:blink:. Us electrical chemical human engines have our own EM fields and a dowsing switch, rods, whatever works:huh:, are just antenna to indicate changes in our own fields. That's my thinking and I'm sticking to it as a working hypothesis.:ph34r:

Don't step on any bombs or in old septic tanks. I have an amusing olllld septic system story if anybody's interested. I get  laugh remembering it. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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I think there are a lot of things that just because we can't explain how it works, doesn't mean they don't. 

Septic systems were a sore subject around here for awhile until we got it fixed finally... makes my stomach turn just thinking about it. I'd love to hear your story. Although, they may kick us off this topic!

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Mr. J. Frost,

Further to your electromagnetic notes, permit me to add a further note.

Years back, (about 30 or so), some research workers ran an experiment. they placed a copper belt on the lower back of several very adept dowsers.

Behold , their ability tanked with those belts, descended to zero. When the belts were removed their ability returned.

I suspect that dowsing relies on a person's ability to sense electromagnetic signals.

The takeaway, to this factoid,   is,  'never dowse while wearing copper under ware'.

SLAG.

Mr. Blacksmith 450 your wrought iron bottle opener is beautiful. Good job

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Nice work with the WI!

As a newly graduated engineer, I was introduced to dousing on a construction project in a old industrial part of Detroit by an elderly tunneling supervisor during the last millenia. I naturally had my doubts. There were MANY unlocatable water lines of various sizes and pipe material. I fashioned a set of dousing rods from copper rod held in pvc pipe. My best find was a wooden stave water pipe at a depth of 4' feet . Can't explain it, haven't done it since, but a believer.

I finished a spring Fuller today. An unapologetic plagiarism of Jim Coke's design. Also a mount for my hardy on the anvil block.

IMG_20191130_132902632.jpg

IMG_20191130_143541607.jpg

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1 hour ago, blacksmith-450 said:

Wrought iron bottle opener :)

Nice opener, the grain really pops. What did you etch with?

1 hour ago, GolFisHunt said:

An unapologetic plagiarism of Jim Coke's design.

Don't worry, he plagiarised the guy who copied the guy who copied the . . . . ;) I think you'll find it easier to use if you open it up some.

No copper belts eh? That is an interesting note Herr Slag. A Faraday effect maybe?

I'll think of something blacksmitherly to add to Gary's dead septic story. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Greetings Golfishunt,


         Doin just fine. Now for a bending fork and a twisting wrench. Nice cut off saddle too. 

Forge on and make beautiful things 

Jim

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Blacksmith 450,

You're welcome.

Frosty,

I think you are correct, it probably is an example of the Faraday effect.

SLAG.

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