littleblacksmith

What did you do in the shop today?

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2 hours ago, jlpservicesinc said:

crazy nice Alex,  What kind of chain do you use? Commercial made? 

Thank,

Yes commercial made.

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Jaw dropping beautiful, Alexandr. Did you do the install or have a specialist do it?

Frosty The Lucky.

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14 minutes ago, Frosty said:

Jaw dropping beautiful, Alexandr. Did you do the install or have a specialist do it?

Thanks.

Installed with the owner of the house, together. 1,5 hour. The process has been completed ,оne person can raise the chandelier.

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How many chandeliers did you install in this house? These pictures aren't the same one you showed us earlier today. 

I never thought of turning a light on while installing it but its a definite plus to have good light. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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2 minutes ago, Frosty said:
4 minutes ago, Frosty said:

How many chandeliers did you install in this house? These pictures aren't the same one you showed us earlier today. 

These are different houses.

 

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I guess I should've looked at the ceiling and it's profile more closely, I assumed the way it's build meant it was the same house. My mistake. 

Is this a common building technique? Houses are built in a similar manner here but they're not common for the expense. Of course if a person could afford to hang one of your chandeliers in it they could afford solid wood construction. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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6 minutes ago, Frosty said:

Houses are built in a similar manner here but they're not common for the expense. Of course if a person could afford to hang one of your chandeliers in it they could afford solid wood construction. 

Customers are different.

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Those are some seriously beautiful houses also.

Alexandr, you would not have got me up that ladder for love nor money. 

So i went to the Hard Wood Store to get a chunk o' wood. They did not have what i wanted, red heart, but they did have purple heart, but it looked almost dyed rather than natural. So after some browsing i finally found something i liked. Zebra wood, real Zebra wood and not a marbled Maple or something. I like the contrasting colors in it. I took a small sliver and gave it a quick sanding and a coat of tung oil. You can not see the depth in the grain in the photo but it has gold hughes  and almost looks like a Tigers eye stone. Really nice wood i think but at $16 a board foot i would not build a house out of it.

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15 minutes ago, BillyBones said:

you would not have got me up that ladder for love nor money. 

2 times fell from the stairs, once a broken arm, a second fractured rib. I became afraid of heights.

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Your not the only one. I feel off a roof when I was about 16 or 17 two and a half stories and landed on cobblestone on my rear end. I broke my tail bone and compressed some vertabrae. 10-50 feet makes my palms sweat but after I get higher I'm fine. Rappelling doesn't bother me till it's almost over. Same with skydiving, and small aircraft, rock climbing or whatever. Ladder height is what gets me nervous and makes my mouth go dry and palms sweat.

Pnut

Edited by pnut

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I just did a bunch of clean up stuff and puttering.  I wanted to get some hammer time in before tomorrows carving hatchet demo which is usually 6 hrs will be condensed down between 2.5 and 3hrs.  So did welded on the chain links from the Fitchburg forge in  (7 links + hook) onto the other links I had hanging around and then did some rod ends for hooks or chains.  Done for a new video but we will see. 

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I love the look and feel of wooden interiors, something about them really makes me feel comfortable when I am around them. Those homes look like they are straight out of Montana, Wyoming, or Alaska. I find these pictures very interesting because when I think of Russia, I don't visualize country type big homes. More like big city living, or industrial areas.

 

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Dachas?  I was wondering how they would heat such a tall room in a cold climate?  Under floor heating would be what I'd want!

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Finished up the most recent project, a nice little hatchet for those long hikes. The hatchet head is made from a really thick railroad anchor and the handle is made from ash. I used a torch to burn the wood and I finished it with some blacksmith goop while the wood was still warm. I have never used the goop on wood but it gave a very nice coating. Definitely a project full of learning, its not perfect, the hatchet head is a tad loose on the ash, no matter how much I wedge it still loosened. I believe this is because I did not use the proper drift so the eye does not have the classic hourglass shape on the inside:wacko:. I tried to correct this to some degree with files but to no apparent effect.

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Nice work.  The loose handle...the wood part; that's a lot easier to fix than the steel part!!  You'll get it tight to fit.

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Mr. B. Bones,

Purpleheart is, indeed,  a beautiful wood. 

It is a spectacular colored wood.  When first cut it is a bright medium purple.  (it looks like it was dyed, very brightly.)

Regrettably,  the color rapidly turns a  dull, drab, purplish medium brown.

I suspect that ultra-violet inhibitors in varnish will slow down the color conversion. But the reaction is inevitable.

A real shame. (and the reason that I do not use that wood.).

Most exotic hardwoods eventually darken given time and exposure to air and light.  A few even lose their grain contrast.

Olive wood, has spectacular grain,  (figure), and color and works well,  both the African variety,  or the dearer Bethlehem variety.  Neither of them are cheap though.

Bubinga also has spectacularly variable grain and color.

But the cost of purple heart is not expensive compared to most other 'exotic'  hardwoods.

SLAG.

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For a time, New York City was using purpleheart for all their park benches, as it is very hard and thus very difficult to carve one’s initials into.  

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 Mr. ThomasPowers,

wrote, above,

" … in a cold climate?  Under floor heating would be what I'd want!  "

Yes  indeed!

I saw many houses that had underfloor heating, when I was in Korea,  (ages ago).

They called  (call), them "ondoles". It makes them very cozy houses. A hot bowl of kimchee also helps keep out the cold.

Regards,

SLAG.

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I could tell just by picking up a piece of that purple heart how much more dense it was. It was much heavier than many of the other woods. 

I like the under floor heat in a bathroom. Can not stand getting out of the shower in the winter and stepping on a cold floor. 

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19 hours ago, BillyBones said:

Alexandr, you would not have got me up that ladder for love nor money. 

 

18 hours ago, alexandr said:

2 times fell from the stairs, once a broken arm, a second fractured rib. I became afraid of heights.

I am also afraid of heights. The cold front we are having is preventing me from finishing this tree where my shop will go up. I too am shaky up to about 50ft. Captain Fraver (fighter pilot who saw ufo) said at 2,000’ or 20,000’ the ocean looks the same. That ladder angle in Alexandr photo is deceiving.

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16 hours ago, Marcus_Aurelius said:

the hatchet head is a tad loose on the ash, no matter how much I wedge it still loosened.

Try standing it up in about 3/8 or 1/2 inch of BLO with the wedged end submerged until the end of the handle won't absorb any more oil. It might take a couple of days.

Pnut

Edited by pnut

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Cut up a material handling rack for the steel and casters. 

Before:

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After:

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(For reference, the wheels on the casters are 8” in diameter.)

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Today I had my first of what I hope will be many one on one lessons with a local smith. These are my finished product. To any other novices, if you can find someone or a group i highly recommend. Corrected a lot of form issues early on. And i had a blast.

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Ty. The middle was the second one I made and was done with minimal instruction. Was my I walked you through the first. Now do it again. I'm tickled pink with how they turned out.

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