littleblacksmith

What did you do in the shop today?

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Did y'all get any rain your way Chris? We did this morning and it's very nice out today. I'm going to the shop in a bit when I get done with my household chores

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I had to change two flats on my wife's car in a Thunderstorm last night between 10 and 11pm on I-35 up toward the Kansas border.  (who's ever had to change two flats on the same vehicle in the rain........an hour apart?????)   :angry:  But no rain so far today.

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Oh my. My husband's truck had two flats in a couple days time. But at least the last one, he wasn't far from home. 

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C.T.C.,

The original quotation is:

"Those who can;   do 

And those who can't:  teach".

Those who can do both are less common,  but they exist.

We just have to enquire, and find them out.

SLAG.

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Mr Slag- I had a friend who went from teaching to writing, so I adapted:

"Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach. Those who can't teach, write."

He got and stayed pretty mad at me, until in the fullness of time he showed me a check he got for a screenplay. I just slunk away.

Steve

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CTC...  I agree with catching students attention..   I over the years have taught all sorts of different things and while I have found that the attention-grabbing is one thing usually associated with students who don't want to be there in the first place.. :(

A student that is there to learn because of what is offered vs having to be there is a different kind of student.  The attention is already grabbed and hence the reason why they are there.  I've had a few students who are so excited to be there it's nearly a magical experience..    Also, have worked with students especially in martial arts that just come to see or test your metal..  These guys don't last long.. 

Where I find a disconnect can happen is when the content is boring or confusing and this confounds the student.    Metallurgy graphs, in particular, can be tough as many don't understand what really takes place.. 

One of the largest facets I think is/are overlooked as a teacher is this:       "Not teaching the student the way the student learns"..        Every person I have ever met has some sort of learning disability..   it might be small or large and each person needs to be addressed in a way they can both relate to, and also understand what is being taught..  This responsibility is the Teachers with the assistance of the student. But many times the teacher just teaches everyone the same..  And the students over the years just bury their faces in the sand and accept this as standard.  I don't want this to be the case..    I want the students to want to learn and I want to provide them with the answers that have been eluding them.. 

I have decided that I will offer regular 2 or 3 day classes but will also offer apprentice training time..   This particular training will involve a more in-depth approach with hands-on and direct Q&A as students work..    

47 minutes ago, CrazyGoatLady said:

Oh my. My husband's truck had two flats in a couple days time. But at least the last one, he wasn't far from home. 

I always carry a compressor and tire repair kit in each car as well as a spare tire..  

I went on a road journey once that I was lucky enough to get a flat, immediately got off the next exit and had it fixed only to 30miles later to have a flat again.. 

After that I found a repair kit and compressor and never worried again..   I found a great deal on Slime emergency road kits and carry one in each car/truck.. 

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I haven't been a teacher per se, but I managed a business for several years. My personal style when teaching people how to do the job was to make it fun for one thing. I let people know what I expected right off the bat, but I tried to never make them feel intimidated by me. I let them know that there were no stupid questions and if they had one, not to hesitate to ask. I had people that I had to fire for whatever reason, that will still come up and hug me and tell me I was the best boss they ever had. That blows my mind! I studied on leadership skills and the main takeaway was a manager keeps things going, but a leader inspires others to want to do. I keep this in mind to this day. 

Jennifer, I'm glad you brought that up about emergency repair in the vehicle. I need to remind him to get some gear to keep in the truck. I already have it in mine

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Put a hardy shank on a jackhammer bit, which I will probably turn into a leafing stake in the near future. Also played around with some thin bar to try out some ideas. 

6D87922D-78C8-41C2-ACD5-F48D7EE5BD9E.jpeg

Not shown are the small chisel I made from a Pandrol clip and a kitchen knife I started from a piece of coil spring. The latter looked like it might be developing a crack, so I set it aside to check once it’s cooled. 

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Made a hook out of one of those 12" nail spikes. Picked up some at the scrapyard and wasn't sure what to do with them. I squared it and drew it out to about 13 1/2".  This is hook #2 made from one.20190803_192945.thumb.jpg.b2e2097d3818309766d438fe4e609b13.jpg And a little wall hook made from some flat bar. Not sure of the dimensions because I just picked up a little piece of scrap. I haven't worked with flat bar before, so not too bad for the first thing I guess. 

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Thanks Chris. It's one of those days where I didn't actually plan anything. Just looked through the scrap and those two pieces are what I ended up with^_^

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Well, it sure looks good to me.  Can't wait until I get my forge up and runnin' and can just go out to the shop and take my frustrations out on some hot steel.  I'm anxious to just mess around and see what happens.

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If we lived a bit closer and you had time, you could come use mine and we could hammer together:)

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3 hours ago, JHCC said:

The latter looked like it might be developing a crack, so I set it aside to check once it’s cooled. 

Update: ground off the surface and could find no discernible cracking. I think we’re good, which is a relief. 

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18 hours ago, Chris The Curious said:

The old adage is "There are those who do and those who teach...........but seldom the two are combined in one person."  (or something to that effect)

I've always heard, "Those who can, do; those who can't, teach."  After teaching for 16 years, I added, "Those who can't teach, teach teachers."

 

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Like it, olfart.  I have to agree.  I'm just not far enough along in any of my areas of "expertise" to teach teachers. :lol:

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JHCC love the basket..   That is pretty intense only using a forge..  Pretty easy with an AO torch, but the forge work can be intense. 

Rojo Pedro:  Upset the corner of the hook back into itself where it will be struck with a hammer..   If not the shank of the nail part will bend as it's pounded in.. :) You can do this in the vise or use a cross peen and elongate the corner.. 

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Thanks, Jennifer. It's was indeed a challenge, but a fun one.

6 minutes ago, jlpservicesinc said:

use a cross peen and elongate the corner

Here's a nice little video demonstrating one way to do this:

 

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19 hours ago, JHCC said:

Also played around with some thin bar to try out some ideas

nice basket!

As for the right angle bend. Well I was in Prague in '87 with Lee. He is an excellent smith. He is very involved an amonst the best in smelting and his artwork is excellent.

Having said that I dont agree with his method of making a right angle bend. first, its redundant to forge a 180* bend, then open it to 90*. At the very least the draw on the outside edge is at least twice the draw if you only bend to a 90* You have to put it back somehow. Second he does this to not have to upset the branches, then at ~ 10:19 he does just that. Finally I can see no way to use this method if you are working to dimension. Meaning getting both branches to a specific  length or to forge two right angles say 5" inside radius to inside radius.  

I dont cut and add material. Ive just never tried it, so cant comment on that. Its worth a try if you are confident with your forge welding.

To add to Jen below. It is also a major problem doing a rt angle as in the vid.

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JHCC.  using the first method shown one has to be very, very careful about a cold shut and cracking in the root of the bend..  It's a very big hazard with a tight bend.. 

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Well let me add.....................as a newbie, this was a fascinating demonstration.  Amazing even.  Sure had a smile on my face when he first went through it and showed the final product.  I'm not privy to other methods, so this one seemed to do the trick.  I'll get on Youtube and see if I can find others.

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