littleblacksmith

What did you do in the shop today?

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I purchased a belt blank from a leather company in Montana, USA, from which I intend to make a kilt belt. I've got some 3/8" HR square bar that I think will make decent buckle. I played around with the design & proportions a bit today... Order of operations on this is going to be key, I think.

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I want to see a picture of it when you are finished. I'm connected with a Scottish heavy athletic group.

Laynne

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I forgot I'd not shown a picture of my first Hot Cut Hardy.  Looks kind of silly sittin on my anvil because the Hardy hole is only 5/8".  Oh well it's a start.  I'll get better at making Hardy tools in the future...........I hope.

 

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Chris, I'm glad you finally posted it! Looks good to me. What material did you use? I'm looking forward to being able to use hardy tools with an anvil that actually has a hardy hole. I ordered an anvil today. Anxiously awaiting its arrival now. 

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Thanks to you both.  The steel was cut from a cast-off, hexagonal jackhammer bit from Home Depot...............so don't know exactly what steel it is.  When you drop the bit on the concrete, it rings like a top-dollar anvil.  I only cut about a 4" piece off the bit and I've still got 6 more full bits.  Even gave one to a friend.  So I've plenty of tool making steel for the future.  I forged the 5/8" shaft on a press and then upset the shoulder while it was in the Hardy hole.  My "guide" kept saying "Swing that sledge hammer like you mean it!"  I was afraid I'd break the tail-end off my little Vulcan anvil.............but it held up just fine.  I forged the cutter from the shoulder up with a 3 1/5 pound hand hammer.  I'm a perfectionist, so I'm not totally pleased with how it looks, but I'm sure the steel I cut with it won't see the imperfections. ;)

CGL, I'm envious.............what kind of anvil did you order?  I'm assuming it's new if you ordered one.

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I'm the same way. Never satisfied with my work. But every time at the forge is a great learning experience. I think you did great;) I went with a brand new 100lb. Emerson traditional. I'll finally get to post something on show me your anvil!

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I wouldn't have been able to afford it either. But my husband is wonderfully supportive and he cashed in some small stock he had. That and some money from selling rabbits and chicken eggs made it possible.

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Well, I'm truly happy for you.  Nothing like having the right tool for the job.  I've always hated just having to "do with what I have" when I really needed something else.

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C.G.L.  and  Mr. Dragon, et al.,

I am enjoying this thread,   and C.G.L. congratulations on your acquisition of your new Emerson anvil.

Being a curious citizen, I looked up Emerson Anvils on the net.  The search led me to the Centaur Forge web site.

Their page on Emerson Anvils had this strange disclaimer notice at the bottom of the page.  

I quote,

"The face of the anvil is heat treated and hardened and will give good service for its intended use, which is fitting horseshoes, blacksmithing or knifemaking hot or cold. Anvils will work harden over time. Striking the face with a hammer or doing the ball bearing test will wreck any anvil due to the ball bearing being harder than the face of the anvil. One should always have a mild steel between the anvil face and hammer. Centaur Forge is not responsible for subjecting your anvil to the ball bearing test or any type of mistreatment and will ultimately void its warranty."

I have never heard of an anvil that was dented by a ball bearing. I have never, even read of such a thing.   Oh, maybe a cast iron a.s.o. might be dented by a hardened ball bearing.

The disclaimer clause is void and it is is bizarre  It will not hold up in a court of law.

The implied warranty of fitness,  (i.w.o.f.), is breached. (it is implied in the common law, concerning purchase and sale).

But It is a clause,  ( the i.w.o.f.),  that is explicitly written into all state's Unified Commercial Codes,  (Article 2).

What that clause  means is that a product must do what it is supposed to do. e. g.  Blenders must blend,  cars must drive,      Yo-yo's  must 'yo'   etc., etc.

(come to thing of it, that disclaimer clause will not, protect the defendant seller in an action for negligence. (i.e. product's liability). 

Life can be passing strange,  sometimes

Regards to all the gangue.

SLAG.

 

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Thank you Slag. That is where I bought it from. They had the best price I could find. I read that disclaimer on there also. And I believe it's added to all the anvils they sell. That's the only site that I came across that had anything like that on there. I thought maybe someone got a bad anvil and tried to get their money back? Life is strange indeed

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If a ball bearing (of reasonable size) is dropped from a reasonable distance (10 inches is recommended so the rebound can be measured directly as a percent) and it dents an anvil, blacksmiths would not suggest the ball bearing test as a way to test anvils. 

If a ball bearing dropped from a reasonable distance dents the face of an anvil, then a missed blow from a hammer would be much worse than just a dent.  And think about the blacksmith that bounces the hammer off the anvil face to keep rhythm while forging. 

Quote:  One should always have a mild steel between the anvil face and hammer.

Are they suggesting that the anvils should not be used for forging alloy steels, stainless steels, and other metals that are not mild steel?  What about damascus steel?

Quote: The intended use of the anvil, which is fitting horseshoes, blacksmithing or knifemaking hot or cold. 

How many knife makers use mild steel for their knives?

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C.G.L.,

The law can be very strange at times.

Contractors can put in all manner of clauses, into a contract document,  that will not hold up in a court of law.

Adding such clauses,  is not illegal,  (in and of itself),  in most common law jurisdictions. But the courts will not uphold such clauses, they are void.

But the contract as a whole, is valid. The contract is construed as if that offending clause never existed.

But, you will find a clause in the boiler plate clauses,  (usually found at the back of the contract),  which states that if a clause is not valid/illegal the contract shall  be construed as if that void clause did not exist.

Not many legal jurisdictions have outlawed the use of such invalid clauses.

Soooo,   why do many contracts have these clauses?

 Simple,  when the layman,  contractee,   (usually the purchaser),   finally reads the contract terms,  most often after a dispute, they peruse all the document clauses, assume that all the clauses are valid and come to the conclusion that they have  no  legal leg to stand on,  and that they are sunk.*  And thus do not sue in court,  or strenuously pursue the matter, elsewhere. (e.g. in the press or the media etc.).

Persons with legal knowledge or training know better and often sharpen their proverbial axe, or sword, and get moving.   YEEE-HAAH!

So what are mere mortals to do,   you'ze  might wish to befriend,  and be nice to a legal professional, law student, paralegal, or even,  (gasp),  a lawyer.

Just Sayyin',

Sincerity,

SLAG.

* that screed is a perfect example of a run-on sentence.  And I suspect that the JHCC will soon admonish me,   sigh.

Tomorrow is hammering time, and preparing a delicious chicken biryani.

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11 hours ago, Chris The Curious said:

 I forged the 5/8" shaft on a press and then upset the shoulder while it was in the Hardy hole.  My "guide" kept saying "Swing that sledge hammer like you mean it!"  I was afraid I'd break the tail-end off my little Vulcan anvil.............but it held up just fine.

I don't want to rag on you for using the anvil to upset the shoulder on /in the anvil..  But, Ideally, a London pattern anvil that is 100 years old is not the best option to take a sledgehammer to it to form or forge anything over the heel (tail) or the horn if really wailing on it.  

A German style or type of anvil with the hardie hole supported by more mass is ok, but the London patterns have been known to let loose (snap off) will little warning and now the anvil is ruined as is the history it contains. 

Way back in the day I used to use my Hay Budden anvil, like it was brand new and easy to replace. And figured if they used it that way the day it was made than why can't I..  Well the answer now 20 years later is self-apparent.  

it's your anvil and you can certainly do whatever you want as people do what they do.  But......

Nice Hardie..   I'm a perfectionist too...  It's a wonderful trait... Well, most of the time.. 

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A striking anvil/portable hole (with an adapter, if necessary) is a great option for upsetting hardy tools. 

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Jhcc. I love the stuff you have made. that is fantastic and a brilliant example to have on the shop floor. 

SLAG, 

A company cannot control what a new owner will do..     A ball bearing will certainly dent and anvil face if thrown hard into an anvil.  A hammer face will dent an anvil face with a miss strike and a ball bearing is harder than most hammers.

I'm not trying to create an argument over someone else's warranty limiting but the comment is in relation to a ball bearing damaging an anvils face..   A ball bearing has a higher Rc than most anvil faces and if miss used can indeed dent the face of an anvil. 

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" doing the ball bearing test will wreck any anvil due to the ball bearing being harder than the face of the anvil."

I am thinking that they are referring to  Brinell hardness testing and not dropping a ball bearing on to the face. 

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Jennifer,  I was worried about using my little anvil to upset the shoulder, myself.................but this old feller has over 50 years experience at the forge and anvil and I figured he new what he was telling me to do.  Besides, there wasn't another 5/8" square Hardy hole in the shop.   All of these jackhammer bits (6 of them) have a shoulder on them already, so in the future I plan on using the existing shoulder and not pounding that hard on my puny little Vulcan.  "Rag" on me all you want.  I happily yield to experience.  If I ever get a "grown-up" sized anvil with a larger hole, I'll make an adapter like JHCC's so I can use any previously made 5/8" Hardy tools I've made.  The hunt for a decent anvil continues.

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