littleblacksmith

What did you do in the shop today?

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That is a fine piece of work Goods. Well done.

Frosty The Lucky.

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1 hour ago, jlpservicesinc said:

Hows it feel in the hand? 

Honestly, the handle could be another half inch taller. It’s little tight on my hand, but should be good for him.

Thanks for the compliments! My first real project was a claw hammer that I gave to him for his birthday last November. It’s funny how I have given all of my finished item away as gifts or donations. I never have anything to show it people when they ask to see my work. Maybe someday I’ll get more time in the shop!

Thanks Again,

David

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There has been some stellar work posted on here! Well done to everyone. I had to clean the shop to work in it. Mowed grass and cleaned up around the farm so I could get in some hammering.  No great shakes. I made a punch from 5/8" sucker rod. Came out to 11" long. I didn't think my little anvil would stand up to it. First time I've ever worked that material and first tool I've made that will need heat treating. Little nervous because I've not done that before either.  I'l have to study up on that. Wish me luck...

 

 

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I'm apologize,  I'm not sure who that question is directed at Steve. If it's me  it's sucker rod. If not, I apologize again. I didn't want to be rude by not answering a question, just in case:)

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Posted (edited)

Mowed the grass??? With all those goats? Your backyard should be as bare as a goose egg ... or is it ... bare like a Scotchman's knee? :)

What's the punch for?

Edited by Mod34
Excessive quoting removed

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Haha I don't have enough of them to keep up with the grass. We've had a lot of rain, and it grows like crazy. We sell eggs and rabbits and I try to keep it looking nice for business. I leave it high for them, but take a little off the top so it doesn't look like a jungle. The punch is for making holes in wall hooks if it'll work. Really just for something I've never done to see if I can do it.

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Thought I’d make a little axe for no reason other than my own amusement. About half of a farrier’s rasp and a stick I picked off the forest floor last summer. Finished with raw linseed oil. I mowed the lawn too - no goats to help.

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You do nice things for amusement, Neal I like the way the texture shows what it was made from. I have a zillion of those rasps just sitting around doing nothing. Could try one of those but not too confident with the forge weld.

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10 hours ago, Goods said:

I never have anything to show it people when they ask to see my work

  I was told by a very seasoned smith in one of the groups I frequent, when you make a project....make 2 at the same time. That way, if you mess one up, you have a spare. And if you don't, you have one to use or hang on the wall. Great advice.....I just don't follow it very often....               Life is Good               Dave

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Dave51B, whoever told you to make 2, just wanted you to practice more..  LOL.. 

That is not great or sound advice unless you are in sales and have a steady demand for a product or item.   

the best way to get good at blacksmithing thing is to practice.. The best way to get good quickly is to take a lesson or 2, the best way to get good at this blacksmithing thing is to ideally do the first 2 things mentioned and then to want to produce good, clean work. 

Good, clean work is a choice and you couple this with practice and easy knowledge (taking a lesson from a good smith free or paid) will keep the shop a little emptier and keep from having things you made 2 x to get one.    Just do good work on 1..  LOL.. 

If I make something that is not up to my standard I will make whatever it takes to get to the standard desired.   Not happy with a hinge eye, I'll make 3, 5, 10 whatever I need to make to just make that part or aspect to my liking.  I don't save or make a full hinge.. just the eye, over and over and over again. cutting it off and throwing it in the scrap bucket to be forge welded back into a bar at some future date when I want hammer time but having nothing in mind to make. 

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Nice punch goatlady but I think it's too long for practical use. On the other hand 11" will get your hand farther from HOT stock so. . . Good place to use Wolf Jaw tongs with a short punch. Later projects, Hmmmm?

Good advice Jennifer. Correct and perfect the problems not the whole piece. Good clean work is something to aspire to.

Frosty The Lucky.

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8 hours ago, Frosty said:

Nice punch goatlady but I think it's too long for practical use

You're right. I got caught up in thinking I wanted to be well away from the heat. Maybe cut it off? I have some spring steel, which leads into tonight. I had a great time with my son in the shop. He gave me my first lesson in welding. We cut off a 5" section of spring and decided to tack weld a rebar handle to it because I don't have tongs to fit and that would be easier anyway.  He asked me to make a handle for his welder cart. So I made that for him and told him what I have learned. Then onto the spring. My weld failed, but his held up. So, I'll work on getting better at that. His handle is rebar. I know, I know! Its awful stuff to forge, but that's what he wanted because of the texture. He was drilling holes in it and it ate the drill bit on the last two holes. When it's done, I'll get a picture of it mounted. But it was such a wonderful time with my boy ( he's 25).  Couldn't ask for more

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Dear CGL,

It has been my experience that rebar can vary greatly in carbon content (read "hardness") along the length of any given piece.  At one place you can drill holes or file like it was butter and 6" away it seems as hard as a file.  Since rebar is usually made from scrap and because it is intended only for re-enforcing concrete it is not very homogeneous, particularly a lot of the Chinese made rebar which is pretty common these days.  Older, salvaged rebar is often more consistent.  Therefore, it is possible that the reason your weld failed and your son's held could be due to different metallurgy at the 2 different weld sites.

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

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9 hours ago, CrazyGoatLady said:

That should have said coil spring, not spring steel. 

In a comment now moved to a separate thread, jlpservicesinc replied "It's all good..  most but not all springs are 5160."

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George N.M. Thank you for bringing that to my attention.  I never thought about that being a possible reason for a failed weld. I figured it was just the operator (me);)

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Most steels made today are recycled metal.   The manufacturers do not test for every possible element in the melt, only what is needed to make specs.   For example, why pay the expense of testing 'rebar' for Chrome, Vanadium or Moly content when the small amounts possible from the scrap being used does not effect the end result of strength?   Both of these are tested for when making 'M' or 'A' series steels because it will effect  usage in those applications, as these series are an alloy spec, meaning content, and rebar is about usage not content.3

Also tool steels need to be homogeneous and rebar does not, so why spend the money to heat and mix a melt for 15 minutes when all is needed is to get it liquid enough to pour the rebar?  Its all about expenses

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Thank you Steve. That gives me a much better understanding of why it behaves the way it does. In the simplicity of me just trying to forge it, it's very difficult. I was given several lengths of it and thought I'd try. I would not recommend it however

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Dear Steve,

Is rebar cast product or a rolled one?  I always assumed it was rolled with the ridges created by the rollers.  Many years ago I worked at the US Steel South Works Alloy Bar Mill but we never produced rebar, just rounds and square stock.

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

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As I understand it, rebar is generally produced in what's called "continuous casting", where molten metal is poured into a ribbon-shaped mold and is immediately rolled into a thinner ingot as it cools and solidifies. That ingot is then sent to a rolling mill to get rolled down to the size and shape of the finished rebar.

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In the 90's high humidity, so i have made a lot of sweat. 

I my self like longer tools. Almost all my punches and chisels and the like are at least 10 inches (or at least were) I have better control holding the chisel rather than a handle or tongs. I also do not like to wear gloves so i like the extra length. 

Mowed the grass also, early so along with that and the green coal i been burning you can guess i am a popular guy right now. 

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I too prefer longer tools for hot work. I make them around 14".  Cold work tools are usually about the length of my hand or so.

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Played with The Pressciouss. Made a little leaf, just for fun:

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And squared up the end of jackhammer bit for a hardy tool:

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I’ve learned a couple of good lessons for using a press: get your workpiece really hot, take little bites to minimize contact with the dies, and have another project going simultaneously to fill the time between heats. In this case, I made a double caliper:

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Just for fun, I used the press for setting my touchmark.

Now, if I could just remember what that hardy tool was supposed to be in the first place….

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