littleblacksmith

What did you do in the shop today?

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Chris,

Thanks for the complement, The class was worth every minute, especially for someone just starting out. I learned so much, so quick, that it can't be explained and we had fun the entire time. The cost was very reasonable and the value of the tools were about 5 times the cost of the class, experience, can't put a price tag on it.

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5 hours ago, Les L said:

First thing I learned was it's been a while since I swung a 12# maul all day.

Oh my aching back! That's what teenagers are for Les. :rolleyes: May we see some closer pics of your tools please? They look pretty good from here.

Frosty The Lucky.

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I surprised myself that I held up over the two days. Cancer treatment two years ago took a lot out of me. I had a young man 40 yrs younger than me for a partner and he kept asking “how do you hit like that”? I was able to show him technique to increase power and save energy. He wanted to learn and would listen, big change from most of the young people I’ve worked with recently. 

Will sen more pictures in a few minutes. 

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I'm not surprised at all. Youngsters who come back for a second session are typically there to learn what they can. Seeing first hand how an old man can hit harder with a flick of a wrist than they can with a full overhead swing, double jack sledge techniques are equally or more superior, grow big ears almost instantly. 

You tend to find youngsters at blacksmith club meetings have a pretty good handle on what hard work is worth. 

Frosty The Lucky.

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Frosty,

I agree, they want to learn, listen and attempt to duplicate, are not afraid to ask what they did wrong and need to do to correct it and are very polite.

We made our rounding hammer first. I don't know if I can identify the instructor on this forum, but most will recognize the style and know who he was.

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Then made our hot cut hardy (may be wrong name, please correct if needed, he just called it hot cut)

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Then made a set hammer, I still have a little dressing to do.

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Then a handled hot cut, we used our set hammer to set the shoulders  IMG_0214.jpg.3bace186cd02d96182eaf4ba365cad33.jpg

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Hmmmmm, I THINK maybe I recognize that hammer style. Beautiful job, well done.

Hot hardy or Hot cut hardy are just fine. Hardy IS a chisel that fits in the hardy hole to cut stock, Hot, cold, hardy is technically what they're called but a butcher might fall into the category too. 

The handled version is often called a top cut or hot cut.

Tools with a square shank that fit the hardy hole are "bottom tools." Tools with handles you hold on the work and strike with a hammer are, "Top tools." 

I'm not trying to be a semanticist I'd just like to see folks using a common trade language, Jargon. Especially with a world wide forum like IForge. I don't hold myself up as an authority even if I keep plugging away at it. 

Beautiful tools, use them in good health and don't forget to tell the grandkids the story when you pass them on.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Frosty,

Thanks for the complements and explaining the proper names of the tools. I know what they are used for, but can't always remember the name.

I've read and heard so much in the last few months i'ts all running together. I believe in using the proper/common term so please continue to correct me when I mess up (you notice I didn't say if I mess up?)

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Credit where credit's due Les. Don't sweat my opinion about terminology. 

2 minutes ago, Les L said:

(you notice I didn't say if I mess up?)

Oh yeah, makes you an up and comer. ;) I figure I'll have plenty of time to not mess things up after I'm dead.

Frosty The Lucky.

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25 minutes ago, Frosty said:

Tools with handles you hold on the work and strike with a hammer are, "Top tools." 

Also “set tools”: a “hot set” is the same as a handled (or top) hot cut, a “cold set” is the same as a handled cold cut, and a set hammer is so called because it is a hammer that is held in the work and struck rather than swung. 

As for me in the shop today, I finished assembly and did a test run of The Pressciouss. 

 

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JHCC,

Just when I thought I might be starting to learn something you threw in trigonometry! Just joking, thanks for the help, or maybe warning. I can see I'll still be walking around lost for awhile, but I learn something new every day, thanks to all on this site.

The press is looking great!  bet you can't wait to stick hot iron in it.

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SOHCAHTOA, man. Gotta love it. 

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Dang, Les, that's a satchel full of hammers and tools.  They all look first rate.  I'd love to do a class like that some day when funds allow.  How many days was the class?  I can't imagine doing all of that in one day.

JHCC, I think you need to give The Pressciouss  some pep pills. ;)   I'm far from being able to comment from experience, but will the metal have time to dissipate some of it's heat to the dies before it gets squished and released?

 

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50 minutes ago, JHCC said:

Also “set tools”: a “hot set” is the same as a handled (or top) hot cut, a “cold set” is the same as a handled cold cut, and a set hammer is so called because it is a hammer that is held in the work and struck rather than swung. 

Ok, since language is the only thing we have.  

A set tool is not a tool for cutting..   A set tool is a flat usually square faced bottom tool that fits in the hardie hole,  and/or top tool that is indeed used to  " Set" a shoulder or a defined area down. 

A handled tool can be called a  Handled Hot cut, Handled cold cut.  handled top swage. etc, etc.   When in a shop the lingo is very much dictated by who the shop people are. But a set tool is always just that.. Used for setting down.. 

I use handled and non handled top tools both and including a Set hammer or simply "set" for the non-handled variety.  

there are bottom swages.  there are bottom "set's" there are both hot and cold as well as straight hardies,  there are also offset hardies,  etc, etc etc, ..  

Enjoy. 
 

@jhcc you are going to need a faster pump or a smaller cylinder... 

Yesterday was the 2nd demo day of the year.  I did a demo at the Orange Engine show.  The last few demonstrations have turned into a discussion about heat treatment and heat treatment strategies. 

I did way more talking than demonstrating which seems to be the case these days unless I am ignoring everyone.  :) 

I'm working with a new auto-tracking camera so there are some hiccups learning it's uses.. Bummer too because the discussion on heat treatment and the forging of the heart would have been captured... 


 

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Trig shucks! Now my eggs are really scrambled, but I'm still hanging in and learning.

Chris,

That was two days, 10 hrs. the first and 11 the second. We had some lost time the first day waiting for all 8 to complete each step, but the second day was almost non stop. Each person performed one step at a time then swapped and your partner did the same step, it would take two to three heats to do each step and swapping out with your partner as striker allowed you to rest from swinging the maul. It wasn't bad at all, do not hesitate to do it if you have the chance.

I don't know what the price for the class is if you go to his shop compared to what our club set up, but it wasn't bad. PM me and I can give you information on the instructor so you can check into it if interested Your Blacksmith club may want to check into setting up a class like ours did.

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While I would love to have a two-stage pump that would provide high velocity when unloaded and high pressure when loaded, I’m hoping that the estimated 19-25 tons of force will be sufficient to move steel better than I could by hand. As Frosty said, a slow press is better than no press.

I might switch to a better pump later, but a new one would cost more than I’ve put into this already. 

In the mean time, the non-detent valve means that I can preset the dies close to their working distance before I start squeezing. 

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Jennifer,

For some reason all your response , and pictures, didn't come through on my end until now. I wish I was in your area so I could come see some of your demos. I learn so much from your videos that I can't imagine what I could learn being there in person and asking questions about steps I didn't fully understand. 

I understand about shop lingo being different in different areas, I work for a company that has offices in 4 different states, almost every tool has a different name in each area, much less each state. I'm like Frosty and most others, one name so everyone knows what the person is talking about.

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Just now, Les L said:

I can't imagine what I could learn being there in person and asking questions about steps I didn't fully understand. 

Speaking from personal experience, it’s awesome. 

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I am sure it is, I can only imagine at this point. Maybe in the near future when I have time to travel I may be able to show up somewhere she is working.

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2 hours ago, JHCC said:

a hammer that is held in the work and struck rather than swung

If it isn't swung it isn't a hammer. Right on the money otherwise John. 

Presscious! :D

Frosty The Lucky.

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By the way, when I am working with my sledge hammer buddies on a project.. I need only say hot, cold,  (size of set 2", 2 1/2" )set, 1/2 round, 3/4 round.. etc, etc. and it's common knowledge what the striker is supposed to grab.   A new person in the striker role. setup up the whole explanation aspect of the job at hand. 

Pretty much anybody is welcome to hit me up for a visit...  Time-dependent of course. JHCC and I had missed for 3 or 4 visits of him in the area before finally connecting. 

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Finally got the hacksaw ready to go with back to see family. I’m pretty sure my father will be happy with it. Functions great, but not quite as clean as I would like.

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