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littleblacksmith

What did you do in the shop today?

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haha dangit, I should have proof read better. Apologies folks :P

jlpservicesinc, thank you very much. I just used various hammers including a very tiny ball pein. When I say tiny, it's tiny. The key to my door is bigger than the head of this hammer. Which worked out well for the tip of the smaller spoon. But now that you mention a wood pattern, that sounds like an excellent idea- I'll have to make some. 

These were not annealed, as they seemed pretty soft as is. They were originally copper tubing from the hardware store. I cut it to length, then split down the middle. After shaping though, the material definitely hardened some. Copper tubing worked out pretty good, although I will likely need to pick up a sheet for the bigger forms. 

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Well done indeed..  before copper sky rocketed in price for scrap I'd stop by some plumbers places and ask about used removed 2" or larger copper and give them scrap price..  worked out a lot of the time..

 

I still have a few pieces left and live how nicely it takes shape..

 

Really nice work on all.   

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Thanks. The copper tube thing never occurred to me, until a friend mentioned it after showing me a spoon he made as well. It takes a little fiddling, but seems pretty well proportioned for spoons once flattened. Using a hacksaw, despite having several power tools more than capable for the job, is oddly satisfying on copper. The bigger spoon I made, was from 1'' copper tube I believe? 2'' tubing sounds pretty handy. 

I may continue on this route using the tubing, seems much easier to get. I'm not quite ready to shell out the money for a big sheet of copper yet, although tempting. 

Do you think it's a softer type of copper in general, or just pre-annealed?

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pipe is cold worked so like right in the middle of the hardness factor...  Annealed copper of this thickness you can use your thumb to push it into the die.. Well nearly so.. 

If you are not experiencing any cracking while forming your all set.. 

The more the cold worked the stiffer it will become and the more usable it becomes for tools like spoon and such that might otherwise bend in use if just left annealed.. 

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The more it's worked the shinier it will become also. Have you ever seen a cold worked candy or apple butter kettle? 

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Thanks jlpservicesinc. I'll keep pushing my luck for now, when I see a crack, then I'll know the limit. =)

pnut, I have not seen that but will check it out. I've noticed for sure that it get's a little shinier as also as your mentioning. 

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Pnut.. That polish also happens for other reasons..   I worked at a candy preparer years back..  Candy apples.. Used to melt down the sugar into syrup.. 

Absolutely polished, mirror quality tooling will offer the best and easiest finish.. 

The kettles for candy are stirred with wooden paddles usually also there is a light acid type effect with the sugar and is also slightly abrasive..  ( don't remember the PH and the abrasive factor but).. Maybe Thomas Powers has the information tucked back in his brain somewhere.. 

Candy that hardens on the kettle used to be knocked off and the surface under it was a lot like removing flux from a welded chunk of metal.. Clean, but slightly chunky looking.. 

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I was referring to the planishing  done during manufacturing the kettle 

I watched a documentary yesterday about a shop in Ohio that's been making copper kettles for over 100 years. It was on pbs. I think they're located near Columbus. 

Bucyrus kettle works is the name of the place. I think Bucyrus is a town outside of Columbus but not 100 percent sure. 

I also worked at a candy company long ago but it was a factory not a shop. I made air heads for van melle. 

Anyhow mudman beautiful spoons and jlpservices I truly enjoy your videos you lay things out in an easy to understand way that can penetrate my thick skull. Most how to type videos are a pain to watch but I enjoy yours 

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Copper is weird metal . Use definitely will polish it. I don't have much experience with it. I made an evaporator /condenser when I was a teenager. I tried making my own "beverages"  for a while.  I'd like to try some more sheet metal work though. I played with an English wheel and a power planisher at my friends bike shop but its not something I just took to. I need some practice but I did make a passable fender.

With a lot of help from him. 

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9 hours ago, JHCC said:

That’s why I said “finished forging” rather than “finished”!

You sure did and I misinterpreted it. I confuse so easy. 

Frosty The Lucky. 

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A plumbing re-hab some time ago left me w a 12 ft stick of 3 inch copper----cut it into 2 footers and split them length-wise----using a small sledge with a smooth face and an upright chunko firewood-----opened them up and flattened them----a workout !!!!---as it is easier to polish than age-----have left them in the elements---BEAUTIFUL patina !!!----too many projects too little time......

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I converted my Oxy Acetylene torch to also operate on propane. It's an old rig and I'm in the process of upgrading it. I bought a new set of hoses, regulators and tips, so I removed the hose connector on the old acetylene regulator and went to Home Depot and bought a couple of adapters to fit it to the propane hose.  If anyone is interested all you need is a 3/8" FL (male) X 3/8" FIP coupling, a 3/8" MIP X 1/4" FIP (female) Hex Bushing. The fitting from the regulator fits in the 1/4" FIP and the left handed threads fit on the hose. It only ran me about $8. 

The oxygen regulator should run low, about 5 lbs, or it keeps blowing out the flame with small adjustments. Otherwise it works great for heating metal, which is all I use it for. Tank upgrades are coming nex. 

qABAlDd.jpg

Here's the flame on a welding tip. 

boZZsBu.jpg

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I got my best peened end on a rose yet on this first one of a second batch of 3. Pretty much where I'll end it tonight but I'm happy with it and another lesson in the toolbox-brain box. I kept making the end nub (rivet nub) thin on the "bud" on these, where I attach the flower part, and sometimes had trouble getting them good and snug. I left this one thicker and with some pinpoint heat from the OA torch it peened "riveted" great and tight. 

So happy when I figure a new trick to make things go better. 

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This weekend I worked on some blockhead style skulls. 3 are made from 4140 and 2 made from some random splitting wedge that was in my garage. I usually make smaller pendent sized skulls so trying these larger ones was a fun challenge.

The chunks of 1 inch x 1.5 inch 4140 sure takes a lot more effort to work than the 3/16" mild flat bar I am used to.

I also made some spirals out of spring steel to later be bunched like a plant, then welded into a large gear as a base for future yard art.

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Olydemon, I've never seen anyone actually make a skull. How do you get the bulge at the top?  Upset it or draw down the jaw?  They look great they each have their own personality.  Good job. After a closer look probably a bit of both 

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Everyone is producing some incredible stuff, the skulls and flowers are great.

Made a handle for the wrench and got it welded on over the weekend.  My first attempt at a pineapple twist.

 

Wrench.jpg

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On 1/28/2019 at 4:01 AM, pnut said:

Olydemon, I've never seen anyone actually make a skull. How do you get the bulge at the top?  Upset it or draw down the jaw? 

Yea, basically a bit of both. I start by rounding the top some, then I go at the bottom of the jaw over the anvil. The last thing that gives some shape is punching the eyes.

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Olydemon, yep that sounds like what I was thinking. After I looked at it for a second it seemed pretty self explanatory. I Started typing before I started thinking. :) oops.  I do think they have personality in spades though. Im gonna give it a try soon. Have you tried rubbing anything dark into them then wiping off the high spots like you do with engraving.?

I'm off to work. Have a productive day folks. 

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TED TED TED TED TED--------------------------DANGER Dr Smith Warning Warning!!!!!

Is your acetylene regulator rated "for all fuel gasses" and is your hose rated for propane as well!

Propane eats the seals on regular acetylene equipment and at some point it will start to leak. SEVERE DANGER if your shop is associated with your dwelling and enclosed.

Now if it is so rated; nevermind! This was just a Public Service Announcement for new people...

Olydemon; I've been known to glue beads into eyesockets.  I like the red ones with a reflective inner liner so they 'glow", or the snake eye beads...

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23 hours ago, pnut said:

Have you tried rubbing anything dark into them then wiping off the high spots like you do with engraving.?

I have only treated a few with beeswax to protect from rust. The idea of coloring the low spots does sound interesting,  may have to give it a try.

22 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

I've been known to glue beads into eye sockets. 

Beads is a good idea. I was also thinking of drilling a few holes through the eyes, then smashing some copper wire into the holes.

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