littleblacksmith

What did you do in the shop today?

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It's hard to post anything after Alexandr. Anyway, Two of my kids are currently unemployed so I thought I'd make something to inspire them. I made a couple of business card holders for their future desks.

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Here’s the business card holder I made for Lisa for Christmas. The alto clef is because she’s a violist. 

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(Things have been so crazy lately that I haven’t been able to fire up the forge, so this was all cold work and electrolytic etching.)

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These were fun.  Ironically started on the darkest day of the year. 3 pieces plus the rivet.  

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Very cool, Judson. I’ve thought of making something similar, but I always balk at the thought of having to go out with a blowtorch and a bending wrench to change it over to Daylight Savings Time. 

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Torch only required if you change latitude, daylight savings only requires a little adjustment off true north (rotation of the whole thing) as I understand it.   I'm not far from the 45th parallel so setting that angle was prety easy. Should have added no welding of any kind involved in the making. 

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Judson, a separate thread on the build would be in order I think..   I'm going to borrow the design if that is ok..    Nice work..  What did you use to set the numerals and time bars? Young Mr Yaggy? 

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Drill a small hole in each matching die set and wire them together. Makes finding pairs so much easier.

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Reeltree, that is about the neatest, compact guillotine I have seen. Are the pieces holding the dies sections of heavy gauge RHS tubing? And the steel into the hardy hole is solid or tubular? Neat welds and grey primer - really cool. More for the inspirations file.

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Solid 1 inch stock in hardy, 1/16 th inch flat bar scrap cut into pieces then welded .  Primed and finished with ghost grey industrial paint. An uneven grind on the bottom plate edge looks as if not sitting flat on surface, it is.

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Made a hair clip as a (slightly belated) Christmas present for my daughter. 

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 Also a bottle opener and a few bits and pieces of other as-yet-to-be-completed projects.

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Just got a ring sizer and mandril and stuff aftersome interest in cut nail rings. For now I made a couple random sizes. Got boxes of these nails for$1./lb. at the ReStore recently and they have alot more. 

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20 hours ago, ausfire said:

...that is about the neatest, compact guillotine I have seen....  More for the inspirations file.

The guy from GS Tongs does one very similar and I always thought it was a pretty brilliant idea.  Simple enough that anyone could do it, even if it meant riveting instead of welding.

The lack of a "bottom" under the lower die really makes you smack your own noggin because you didn't think of it.  One of those brilliant little ideas that makes a whole lot of sense.  Why have a bottom plate when the anvil face is as good a bottom as anything you could whip together?!?!  :O

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Yep, that's a neat job too. Why are the guides that hold the dies offset from the hardy piece? Wouldn't it be an easier weld to attach them directly to the inch by inch? I must be missing something there.

And yes, I can see that a bottom plate is redundant.

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3 minutes ago, ausfire said:

Why are the guides that hold the dies offset from the hardy piece?

Honestly, I haven't been able to figure that part out.  Not having one in hand to examine, I wonder if it's for increased visibility as you're working the part.  With the jaws out from the stem, you can see where you're working from all four sides.

Then again, GS Tongs has a very unique perspective on things.  He might have done it just to do it and set his gear apart from the herd much like he did with his tool designs.

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In my opinion the bottom plate is not redundant: It keeps the things  together. I don't want to assemble  the Guillotine every time I need it.

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Depending on the design, a bottom plate (and closed bottom design) can collect debris, slag, etc.

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Just pick up the guillotine with dies in it a couple times and have the  die fall thru the bottom. I drilled a 5/16 hole in the bottom plate to punch out die if gets scaled up.

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