littleblacksmith

What did you do in the shop today?

Recommended Posts

JLP, good idea for those pesky bolts rather than nuts on studs. ( I honestly can't say which is better, just that that is a nice allignment/install tool.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still draw filing the face of my latest stake anvil; where did those blasted apprentices sneak off to?

See if I don't put power in the shop and replace them all with Eeeletterick motors!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Das Thanks, this is the 3rd design and 3rd tool.. The first 1 was a stud like in the picture welded to a head bolt off a SAAB 900 16V Turbo.. this took worked great for 6 years, but then I sold the car to a friend of mine and I made tool number 2 ... Which was the same stud welded onto a 1/2 rod with a 90 bend in it.. I found the 90 leg would get in the way.. 

So, week or so ago while I was waiting for someone to come over I made the main rod and today forged the handle T part and punched the main shaft.. 

From what you have said I'm guessing you know the problem with Audi and some VW rims with the no studs deal..  I"m running 17" rims and get pretty heavy so the tool slides in the hole and then gets used as a 2nd handle as the end of it goes into the bolt hole keeping the rotors in alignment with the rear flange..  

 I was thinking of forging the whole thing but the studs work so well and all ready have the correct threads with the end so went back to arc welding it.. 

Thomas, thats how one keeps those really sexy arms..   Last year one guy approached and asked if he could squeeze my bicep..   LOL.. Little weird but it gave him a smile when I said sure.. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah JLP, I've dealt with those. :) not really often but when I do it's frustrating. 

If I get a chance and a fitting stud, be assured I'll be borrowing that idea. ;)

Right now I need to make a stand to bolt the lugs to while having the wheel off but still having it loaded on the suspension, for quarter panel replacement. It's just a weld, measure studs out and drill job. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got into a good rocking motion letting my body put the ooomph into the rasp while my arms were mainly straight and locked with my shoulders putting the downward pressure on the rasp. (I'm using an old horseshoer's rasp, coarse side, on the annealed face made from a sledge hammer head.) I think there will be a blip or two left from tooling when I was trying to make the top face planar with my screw press.  It will be a great eating fork anvil.  Once I get the top to a suitable surface I will need to heat treat it.  Needs a lot more quenchent than I generally work with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand; most folks use them like chopsticks...

Long thin heel allowing you to true the tines at a reasonable distance apart for use as an eating fork rather than a toasting fork.  

I own an original 100 year old squab fork.  Two tines and quite long so you can skewer a couple of squab at the same time.  I've made several repros of it---NOBODY reaches for the last slice of meat when it is in the vicinity!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gatta pay some guys back that my friend talked into (and helped) letting me dive their dumpster when they were closing down an old sewing shop. They wanted "something" so I'm making them some flowers with either butterflies or hummingbirds on them. Trying to use sewing machine parts but used some sinker nails for the petals. Next is leaves and whatever will be on it along with a base. Second one should go easier. 

20181217_224940.jpg

20181217_224925.jpg

8 minutes ago, ThomasPowers said:

I understand; most folks use them like chopsticks...

Could work but a bit heavy. Deffinately a blacksmith diet program. 

( Disclaimer: no I dont know how to properly use stake anvil chopsticks.)

20181217_231246.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tried my hand at some candle holders. Lots of room for improvement but I'm reasonably pleased with how they turned out. I learned quite a bit and will go about it a little differently next time.

IMG_20181215_162600457_HDR.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beefed up an old 12 ton shop press to 20 tons.   3 pieces of heavy wall square stock welded into them selfs keeping one side completely flat onto each other. Added a 1/2" plate on the bottom.

 

IMG_20181218_131448652.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Laynne, Just in time for a little candle light coloring. :) a good addition might be wax catch trays/ pans unless you are using non-drip or dripless candles. 

Realtree, just be cautious of the bolts and the rest of the frame on that press. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The grandkids had been to the house, I didn't realize the crayons were in the picture. That is funny.

I've not done any flat ware, so trays or pans are on the list.

Daswulf, your creativity astounds me. It's like "why didn't I think of that." Thanks for the inspiration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Laynne. I find myself saying "why didn't I think of that?" All the time when seeing other peoples work. :)

As for the flatware, try to make a spoon some time. They are fun. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/18/2018 at 3:44 PM, jlpservicesinc said:

Tubing bender..   The machine with the chain drive on the rounds in the photo.. 

Oh yeah. I did it myself, 20 years ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had a customer ask if I could cut a football into a pendant for a dear friend of hers that's a coach.  Never tried it, had no idea if it'd work out, but I found a nice line-drawing on the internet and used that as my template.  

Since it's for a coach, I talked her into going with a 1095 high-carbon alloy that was hardened in the forge's fires for the pendant.  I figure the coach would appreciate all the sports metaphors he could get out of that.  She agreed.  :D

IMG_7130.thumb.JPG.c46c2e9741e1f62c9c16763b813aa4d9.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure if my noob stuff qualifies for this thread, but I took a beginner's class over the weekend and made this:

IMG_20181217_200408.thumb.jpg.a94e50ecf824a62b12224794d7adea7a.jpg

My first ever nail (head was way off), below it a bottle opener and on top a bulls head I probably will nail to my JABOD forge with the second nail I made, to cover the ugly hole in it.

That second nail was still ugly (i ground the head round), but I made it a lot faster than the first one. That's something, I guess. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great work.. Looks really good from here..   Remember its progress, not perfection..  Perfection will happen over time but to get there the hammers gotta meet the steel..   :)  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you! Yes, indeed, swinging hammers and hitting steel is neccessary to get better, so I'm not discouraged by my pieces being ugly. I only hope the weather this weekend will be good enough for me to fire up my new JABOD version and try it for the first time. It will probably be one of the last times till spring comes around. But I'm antsy about getting some hooks and maybe some more nails done! Also, cutting up some spring steel and make a chisel or punch or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.