littleblacksmith

What did you do in the shop today?

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6 hours ago, jlpservicesinc said:

It's funny how what we think we do and what we actually do are not usually in cahoots.

Also interesting to see how much the anvil is moving around. I'm thinking that I might want to weld the base of the treadle hammer to the base of the anvil, in a bid for greater stability.  I think there's a way to do that while still maintaining the option of detaching the two (by unscrewing four bolts that currently hold the hammer base together) if necessary.

 

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That's a great idea.. Nearly all the old models were bolted to the floor or anvil stump/block for just that reason.. 

if you are using the foot hammer enough than it would be a good idea.. 

Another area that you might want to look at is the length of your tools for use in punching or slitting with the foot hammer..  We have a tendency to look at blacksmithing tools (top tools in particular ) as being very stout..   it was funny when I started to really look around at efficient tooling and started to notice that smaller tooling for a given size is more effective.. 

This summer at the ABANA conference the golden rule of a 3rd came up at the WCB area and they mentioned how this average makes tools that last the longest despite the smaller sizing..  They found that the tooling actually does more work without sustaining the same peening wear.. 

I had also seen this in tooling that I have made over the years as each newer piece got smaller and smaller though still being able to do the job.. 

Don't get me wrong I like "Big tools".. but the smaller ones are usually more effective if all things ratio wise are kept in perspective.. 

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Not quite following you -- "golden rule of a 3rd" as the ratio of what to what?

(Side note: one nice thing about the rodded hot-cut in the video is that you can flip it over and use it as a hand hammer for a couple of whacks to straighten out your workpiece.)

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most tooling is larger than it needs to be with the eye being located somewhere around the middle little 1 way or the other..  Condense the tool down and create a 1/3, 1/3, 1/3rd split vs others.. 1/3 cutting edge, 1/3rd handle, 1/3rd hammer end.. 

I'm not explaining it very well.. :) 

Here is a video which will show the sizes..  Besides that it will save a lot of material.. :) 

 

 

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OK, I think I get what you’re saying: take the length of the eye and multiply that by three to get the total length of the tool. Sound right?

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2 hours ago, jlpservicesinc said:

Some will say that with Cable because it's an homogeneous steel having the welds visible is what will make it attractive so will leave more scale in the billet on purpose.. 

a really good forge weld will literally or nearly be un traceable with etchant if the metals are the same composition.. 

Thanks for the detailed response, Jennifer. Good information! Actually, your point about a cable being homogeneous, and that good forge welds between the same kind of metal are virtually invisible, is exactly why I was inquiring about how carbonized residue or anything else (which would include scale, I guess) would affect the contrast in the cable weld patterns produced.

I would be interested in hearing more about possible methods for achieving a highly distinctive pattern in cable damascus without relying on scale to achieve pattern contrast.

I can think of a possible method that would involve disassembling two different cables, each made of a different type of wire (high-carbon steel wire, "iron" wire, etc.) and reassembling a mongrel cable made from both types of metal, as long as the cable format matches. This could be done at the individual wire level (more tedious), or simply swap strands, such as strands of 19 wires in a 7 x 19 cable.

I've also had a few stray thoughts about some possible ways of using powdered steel/iron or metal-containing flux with cables, but I'll wait until the stray thoughts have solidified and I've done more research before posting any of them. Some initial experiments may be in order.

Al (Steamboat)

 

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There was a recent Forged in Fire episode where a contestant having trouble with his cable Damascus threw some chunks in a canister with some 1095 powder. I suppose you could do the same with a slightly untwisted (and vigorously cleaned) section of HC cable in a canister with 15N20 powder, if such a beast exists. 

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Yes, I think the combination of canisters, cables, and powdered steel or iron present some interesting possibilities.

Al (Steamboat)

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1 hour ago, JHCC said:

OK, I think I get what you’re saying: take the length of the eye and multiply that by three to get the total length of the tool. Sound right?

Like I said.. I'm not explaining it very well..  The 1/3 ratio has to do with how it is the golden rule of mathematics and structure..  If you look are nearly all the farriers tooling being driven by a sledge or hand hammer the ratio becomes pretty small size wise.. 

The sledge is a 10 or 12lbs hammer.  the tool is maybe 1/2lbs..  the Eyes are very small about 3/4- 1" long.. I wish I would have taken more notes when I was there. but simply will reproduce it when the time comes..

Mind you there is a point where Blacksmithing tooling like swages and such change how this is applied.. I was referring more to the cutting and punching tooling.. 

Steamboat -  Years ago I experimented with unwrapping cable and adding in other layering to give a better pattern..  

This becomes almost moot at there are so many other viable options..   Canister,  continuous weld like when making Damascus gun barrels. etc, etc.. Not only that when items like nickel get added in, it changes the temperature at which the metal can be worked without getting shears..  There is also custom wraps.. Before modern cable came on the scene with fine wires.. Most wire layups were fairly stout.. I have some with maybe 1/4" solid round in the cable.. 

Using different cable from different era's, with different braids can play in.. Braided cable vs twisted can change the pattern but it has to be worked initially with wood.. 

Really the sky is the limit with what it is you desire to accomplish..  Different acid solutions will give you different patterns..  This can be a large part to what is visible vs not seen.. 

Also if the blade is hot acid vs cold, Blued etc, etc..  The layering of the blade even with the little acid dip it had rusted in the margins of the cable.. You can see this in the picture.. The weld seams were eaten away more than the cable themselves.. 

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I finally finished a towel bar for my wife. It will go above the sink in our laundry room. It has taken me months to figure out all the elements and bring it all together. I don't get enough forge time.  I'll finish it with paint and a clear coat. I don't want rust on the towels. 

20180930_142111.jpg

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Nice! Clean work, well balanced and totally hand forged.

Especially the flowers and the tenons.

Apparently the thought time was time well spent.  ;)

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Very quickly, I welded some 3/16” plate under the feet of my anvil to make it sit a bit flatter on the floor. I was then about to weld the treadle hammer base to the anvil stand (when wouldn’t you know it) I ran out of flux-core. 

However, even with just one spot weld between the two stands, the whole thing feels a lot more solid. I’ll try to grab a spool of wire tomorrow and finish up before I have to give the welder back in a few days. 

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I do NOT love that I have to give it back. It has been very, very good to me. 

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Time to see if Mayyybeeee you can just squeeze a little more money out of the budget.  I mean look how Useful it is. ;)

 

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The industrial surplus place keeps getting in the old Lincoln round-top tombstones and the occasional Miller Thunderbolt. Maybe it’s time to learn to stick weld. 

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HF now has a multi purpose welder that is a decent machine with 220amps.. mig,tig,stick..

For under 900.00..  if I was in a pinch, I'd buy one in a heart beat..

220amps will cover what most need to weld with multi pass..

 

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It would have to be a long, long way under 900. Remember, I have a daughter in college.

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Multi purpose will give you more creative opportunities.   A stick machine is great but once you have gone to mig and see how fast it is, it's hard to go back..

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8 hours ago, 4elements said:

I finally finished a towel bar for my wife. It will go above the sink in our laundry room.

Nice looking towel rack. I do have one concern before you hang it in place. Are there any catch points, places where you could scrape your hand, catch or snag clothing, or impale yourself while moving near or past the towel rack?  

You may want to sleeve the towel rods or with a clear vinyl tubing so the towels will not show any signs of rust. 

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16 hours ago, Coalforge said:

Had to pull broken studs out of a model A engine.

 Ford or John Deere ?          Dave

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