littleblacksmith

What did you do in the shop today?

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2 minutes ago, jlpservicesinc said:

hot melt or super glue? 

This stuff, which is basically a very thick, flexible rubber cement:

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(Hot-melt would probably work, but I don’t have any.)

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I am familiur with the product.. I like aquaseal much better but it takes longer to dry.. 

hot melt works well as it's quick.. 

So today I did the last demo of the year in Rutland..   It was a 5 hr demo and I decided to make a cable damascus blade.. 

I got it forged to shape and then gave it a quick clean up and then a quick dunk in the acid just to see if anything showed up.. 

It still needs heat treat but I always do a polish and get it to near finished size as everything is finished by hand.. 

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Love the profile of that blade Jennifer. Looks like it has a great balance and should have an interesting pattern after etching too.

 

I didn't have my fire lit today, but did some handle work. Should be lighting the forge tomorrow though as I have 3 more straight razors to hammer out. These will be a new experience as they will be "smiling" razors. Going to be interesting to grind....

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 Quick update on the stem-on-bone experiment: I got impatient and didn’t let the glue completely harden, but it stayed together long enough to get the bottoms ground flat. 

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Just remembered that I think I have some hot-melt glue sticks in the basement. Doesn’t matter if I don’t have the right gun; I certainly have plenty of sources of heat. Definitely looking forward to trying the next time.

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2 hours ago, jlpservicesinc said:

Looking good.. I love seeing work coming along.. That is very nice.. What is the base material and wood? 

Thanks! I say it's 5160, but I can't tell you 100% honestly. It is leaf spring, but my sample pieces took a quench and temper very well using the specs for 5160 and I know it is an alloy that is sometimes used, so I just go with that. Short soak just above non-magnetic to an oil quench, then 2 one hour cycles at 400 gives me a blade that will do a clean paper slice, chop into a 2x4 eight or ten times, then still give me a clean paper slice directly afterwards. 

The handle I do know though, it is mahogany.

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They’re not too heavy. They’re certianly not as light as the sorry chrome ones you get at the dollar store but not cumbersome either. Gonna have to get some stainless for the next set. 

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Not seeing them in the hand might have me thinking they are heavier than they are..   Also Ben I'm guessing you are a strong fella.. You guys don't let the ladies touch the grills down your way? ..    ;) 

They are neat looking.. 

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Had my first student in the shop today who’d already gotten beyond tapers and S-hooks. What did I do in the shop today? I changed my lesson plans! We made a couple of bottle openers to teach him how to slit and drift. It went pretty well. 

After he left, I made what is probably my best pair of tongs yet:

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Jennifer, after I get them finished I’ll post a picture in hand. When grilling beef steak it’s not like you’re constantly holding your tongs and messing with stuff anyways. For the most part you’ve only got one hand occupied with a beverage. 

At my house, I grill. I’ve done it a long time and I’m particularly good at it. My wife doesn’t really want to learn because if I’m grilling she doesn’t have to cook. At my sisters house, she and her husband switch of who grills and they are both better than I am. Man or woman, I don’t care who mans the grill as long at it’s good. My scorn knows no gender if it’s over cooked. 

JHCC, that’s a mighty fine looking set of tongs with a healthy sized rivet. Nicely done. 

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Thanks, RMB. I needed a pair of tongs to hold sheet metal circles to make into bowls, and I think these will serve well.

Here's me starting to cut the reins with the treadle hammer:

 

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 Thanks, Jennifer. Interesting to look at the action from a different angle. 

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It sure is..  It can change the way people see what it is they do..   It's funny how what we think we do and what we actually do are not usually in cahoots..  I often film Martial arts training for that very reason.. 

Sometimes one gets lucky and they are the same..  :) 

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Particularly interesting to note how much the shock-absorbing spring in the linkage is actually doing. Adding that was definitely a good idea.

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I can see where the spring would make it much easier on the muscles and joints, since the effort curve would have a much more gradual ramp-up, and the energy storage and release in the spring should be almost totally efficient. Have you already noticed a difference in terms of fatigue, soreness, etc.?

Al (Steamboat)

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Yes, indeed. Not huge, but significant.

It's interesting to note that with the current length of the linkage, the treadle bottoms out before the hammer hits the top tool. That is, the force of the blow comes from the hammer's momentum, not directly from the muscles of the leg. That definitely attenuates the effort curve and lessens the impact shock on my body at the bottom of the stroke.

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On 9/29/2018 at 7:14 PM, jlpservicesinc said:

It was a 5 hr demo and I decided to make a cable damascus blade..

Jennifer, that is an interesting pattern, and I may be trying some cable damascus soon. What is your personal approach for the initial cleaning of the cable to remove oil, grease, and dirt? Disassembly? Solvents? Burning out lubricants? I've read numerous opinions on the topic, but no solid consensus so far. And what are your thoughts about the effects of any residue that might remain from burning out the lubricants? If there is any carbonized (or other) residue from the burning, I'm thinking that it could affect the contrast of the pattern produced, as well as the characteristics of the steel. Cable lubricants can contain lots of things, like PTFE, molybdenum disulfide, etc.

Having built and maintained a number of equipment items that use wire rope, I've found that different cable lubricants also have somewhat different characteristics when it comes to being able to remove the lubricant with solvents. Acetone works on some lubricants that I've run into, but not so well on others, Stoddard solvent works on some, etc. I usually have 7 or 8 different kinds of solvents available for various cleaning jobs, so finding a solvent that works is usually not a problem for me. However, getting all of the lubricant out of the interior of the cable could be challenging without taking the cable apart. And of course if you're working with fiber-core cable, the core would have to be removed.

Al (Steamboat)

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Al,  I can only share what I do and  I am in no way an expert with doing a lot of cable..   

Me being old schhool and lagging behind the times has me doing things I started doing 20+ years ago..  Personally I just burn the oils out but this also depends on where the cable comes from and what environment it was taken care of in..  As you mentioned some of the additives to the greases don't like to be heated.. Not only from the problem of creating a cold shut or delam but from the aspect that it can be poisonous..  IN the old days it was a lot easier to get plain old No2 grease.. Now not so much.. 

I also have found that certain lubes these days will need to be cleaned with certain cleaners vs others.. Again raising the poison/health issue..  Got nothing on that beside by new cable.. 

If the cable has nylon in it I usually burn that out before doing anything else.. I'll mig weld up the ends to keep the cable intact without cleaning oil off..  If the cable is small enough in cross section (the nylon or filement) it will literally spew out between the cable opening it slightly and just a light bang on the anvil or a wire brushing once transformed to carbon will get the remaining burnt carbon out.. I will then flux it while opened some and then close it back up so the dust and fines won't get in the cable..  Today some are adding carbon back as oil or kerosene as a way of doing the prep before the welding flux.. 

With this said.. I don't preclean any forge welds  which today is promoted as a better way to do it..   I get the reason why and if I were making layered steel billets for sales abroad and buying full sheets to have cut to the exact sizes I wanted it might be different..  Quality is quality. Getting there is different for all.. (Japanese sword makers rarely will clean to shiny metal when making blades.. )

or if I were wanted an easier way to achieve a result with the added assurance of it happening..   There are some things done that will make things much easier and these basic things are more important for a good result..    A clean divot free surface.. (clean meaning no clinker or dust trapped between layers).  a clean fire (not as important with gas),  and then taking the right temperature for the metal to weld at..  One of the things I over look a lot of times is gaps.. When the metal is being heated in a coal forge I will leave a gap..  Usually out of laziness or the thing about  " Can I get away with it"..   

i recently spent quite a bit of time working with the larger wrought iron hammer builds and found these gaps to be a problem because of the length of time the items need to be in the fire to get to welding temps..  The gaps will trap all sorts of things. . :( 

One of the other things I learn and then forget only to relearn again to forget it again.. Is Scarf size...  or metal to scarf size ratio..  This is important by more from a general forge welding side of things.. Only upset the metal enough to have the metal needed for the weld to take place.. The extra metal just causes more problems..


I've forge welded many, many things and items. Where I find the problems lies is when I try to push the envelope to an area I know will be troublesome but do it to refine my understanding just that little bit more..  This blade is an example of when i forged the tip..  I pulled the metal around instead of cutting it on bias.. 

You will be able to see it in the pattern when done.. 

Some will say that with Cable because it's an homogeneous steel having the welds visible is what will make it attractive so will leave more scale in the billet on purpose.. 

a really good forge weld will literally or nearly be un traceable with etchant if the metals are the same composition.. 
 

Hope this helps.. I'm sure others will be along to add more from their perspective.. 

The knife is 3 separate layers of cable.. 

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