littleblacksmith

What did you do in the shop today?

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3 hours ago, Mudman said:

More bottle openers heavily inspired by Jacob faram and Brian brazeal

Good looking openers! I think that the copper rivets in the eyes are nice accents.

Al (Steamboat)

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Ben, I like the smooth sides..  Still not sure what the piston ring grooves are for.. Bling/trade mark?  Sadly I got nothing in terms of what can make or distinguish what sets your hammers apart from others.. 

Unless you are using super steel  or some other unique process or a different design which meets a need.. the hammer making scene is pretty saturated.. There has to be something other than.. to create a draw to buy.. 

The hammer Littleblacksmith made (the cross peen) was an item I would consider purchasing as I liked the shape and style.. I've seen the style before but it was well forged and finished.. I bought 2 hammers from Blu down in VA as I didn't have a hammer with me and they fit the build for a semi new design with balanced weight with a square face and fullered peen..  Anyhow not what I would call finished forgings but I bought them because of the design.. :)  

I"m in the process of forging the new wrought iron hammer build at 4lb + so the one littleblacksmith made is out but I was tempted to buy it anyhow.. 

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Thanks everyone.

Some killer stuff going on too, love the minatures. 

Al, thank you. The copper and brass accents is not my idea, it's something I've seen Faram Forge doing and loved it. With his permission I gave it a go, and really enjoy the contrast as well. Jakob has a good eye. 

 

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15 hours ago, JHCC said:

Added a short spring section to the pedal linkage on my treadle hammer:

Just a thought...

I see that you used what I prefer to call an "extension limit spring," commonly known as an "overload prevention spring." While this type of spring features the ability to limit its maximum extension, it can fail if its extension/load limit is exceeded, which could cause the folded-over wires to straighten out and slip through the spring. If you think that the spring might be the "weak link" in the treadle hammer linkage, you might consider adding a safety chain across it. Not seeing the entire linkage setup, I can't even guess at what kind of load it's designed to carry.

I used the same type of spring when I built my strut-type (aka, stiff-arm) floating dock system (see photo below). I wanted to maintain tension on the cross-bracing cables, but limit the maximum extension, and therefore limit the distance that the dock could shift in the current, which changes from an upstream current to a downstream current with the tides. I installed a safety chain across the spring, just in case the spring failed by taking an an unexpectedly high load, such as the dock being struck by a floating tree trunk, which has happened a couple of times, although not hard enough to cause a spring failure yet.

safety-chain.thumb.jpg.0f3080a6897c831f6897c49df0c24a7f.jpg

Al (Steamboat)

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After finishing brusing the old apple crates with BLO, I made a necklace/ keychain holder. Not exactly what I had in mind but it came together and works.

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Thanks Mudman. I wouldn't call it extra but just seeing things in potential materials. Then, sometimes I just get lucky and things work out to an idea. 

 

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Nice idea Das. Much better than just laying them out on a table.

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Love the jewellery stand Das, and the jewellery itself! Inspiring as always. I'll have to have a go at making some leaf jewellery for my family. Thanks!

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Aus, table space can be at a premium, also it gets them up and easily seen. The nuts are not welded so it can unscrew into 4 pieces for easier moving. I might need to make another and tuck it away. The last show someone wanted a jewelry stand I made so I sold it lol. 

Thanks Jon. Get to it they will love it. 

 

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11 hours ago, Steamboat said:

you might consider adding a safety chain across it.

Good thought, and worth doing.

11 hours ago, Steamboat said:

Not seeing the entire linkage setup, I can't even guess at what kind of load it's designed to carry.

This is in the middle of the chain that connects the hammer arm to the treadle. I stomp on the treadle, the treadle pulls the chain, the chain pulls the arm, the hammer goes along for the ride, and thump. Adding the spring means that when tension is applied to the chain, the spring has to take a moment to compress before it starts to pull the arm. This gives a slightly softer feel to the treadle, which I hope will make it easier on the knees and hips.

If the spring were to fail, the springs at the back of the hammer would pull the hammer up and away from the anvil. In other words, failure of this link would not result in the uncontrolled descent of thirty-six pounds of steel and lead.

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John.. One of the biggest problems with foot hammers is the fact of the knees and hips having to stabilize when in use.. For most this can be a very painful experience as most never developed good hip and knee stabilizers.. 

The problem is exasperated when the knee is having to be lifted past a 90 degrees both at the knee and hip and not being able to flex the hip enough in the socket to lessen the burden..

This makes the hip get all wonky and then to push down on the treadle changes the direction of stress to the other side of the skeletal structure.. 

I have used foot operated units for many years and came to learn those old folks who designed these things had it figured out..  I had a rather large foot operated grinder that I designed with the peddle attached at the far side.. I soon learned that by completely taking it off the pivot it worked flawlessly but it cut my motion in half..  Way back then I was in amazing shape and my hips and knees would yell at me and I could do both russian splits and straight splits..   It was the stabilizers that were lacking.. 

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1 hour ago, Steamboat said:

Really nice hawk! Have you been practicing your throwing?

Al (Steamboat)

Thanks, I practice with my Nin-gu weekly.. I haven't had a hawk to throw since I sold the last 1, 14 or 15 years ago.. 

The hawk was the demo of choice as I had read last years flyer and they offered it at the place I was.. Well until I found out they weren't offering it this year..  They said they would next year though as long as I did have 1 to throw.. :) 

1 hour ago, Daswulf said:

Very nice Jennifer. Has the blade angle I usually expect to see in a thrower.

Thanks..  Just enough forward leading edge..  Was thinking of pulling it up more but left it.. 

Nice work Mudman.. 

Grumpybiker  way to go.. Good as new. 

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Today, I beat a couple of 3/4" Grade 5 hex bolts into mini bearded axe heads, with an eye to turning them into some of those nifty bottle openers. I also flattened out a piece of angle iron and did some preliminary trimming with a hot cut to turn it into a feather.

The bottle openers will be for a long-time friend of mine, the feather I'm making just because. I'm sure one of my pagan acquaintances will covet it if I can get it to come out the way I'd like it to.

No pictures, I'm afraid. Everything was over- or under-exposed.

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Did a lot of carpentry and then made a little headway on the new anvil stand. Already thinking about the tripod stand I need to put together. 

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Mr. G Biker,

Nice job on the Dutch oven bale.

I suspect that she'll love it.

Regards,

SLAG.

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Nice work folks!

JLP, really digging the hawk. Very clean.

 

Grumpybiker, nice work.What caused the bale to fail in the first place?

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I like them Mudman!

Nice fix Grumpy. I have trouble finding a decent dutch oven with a lid for an affordable price let alone making a bail. 

 

Finished another scorpion and figured I would see what sand blasting does to this stuff. Found out it will help some pieces while not others lol. 

Made a snowman for wintertime coming up but I'm in no hurry. I love halloween. ;)

Eh, made one before and it seemed quick enough. Great for Christmas gifts if ya got a welder. 

 

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Jennifer it looks great as is. Doesn't hurt to pull it up a little more but what you have there I imagine would work great.

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