littleblacksmith

What Did You do in the Shop Today?

189 posts in this topic

11 hours ago, Glenn said:

Any time you get burned, even only enough to say ouch, put the hand, or whatever, under water for 15 minutes. This removes the heat from the meat, and keeps the meat from cooking. Use room temperature water.

For the last 30 odd years I have dealt with the daily ouch burns by just blowing on them, rather than plunging into water.

Apart from the fact that it appears to be a natural/automatic reaction I discovered its effectiveness through a curious circumstance. Coincidently the day after I read about it one of the Foxfire books (Hillbilly folk lore book series) I was heating and riveting the last section of Davies Brothers railing at one end of the ornamental canal of Erdigg House for the National Trust. The railings were set on a low wall and as I stepped down from it with the oxygen-acetylene torch in one hand, I grabbed the railing to steady myself with the other...sadly just on the heated section. You will remember this was the last section of railing, the ornamental canal was on the other side so I had no water available! The Foxfire "fire drawing" routine was in short term memory and I carried it out. Didn't think much more about it...until that night when I went to bed. As every blacksmith knows minor burns start to tingle as you relax and warm up in bed, this burn didn't, so I have blown on them ever since, even when there is water present.

The justification the hillbilly healer put forward in the Foxfire book was that the cold water drives the burn in. I reckoned however, that skin and flesh cooled too quick with water which in turn promoted separation and blistering of the skin. By cooling it at slightly slower rate, that extreme differential is reduced and my burns seemed to blister less often. The more severe and blistered burns seem to heal as an ordinary graze type wound more rapidly when blow cooled...

Alan

 

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For medical advice, consult a real doctor with a specialty in the treatment of burns. Keep in mind that they do not always get it right, and after years of training they still call what they do practicing medicine.  

 

You neglected to explain the reference The Foxfire "fire drawing" routine. and I was unable to find with a quick search on the internet.

1 hour ago, Alan Evans said:

The justification the hillbilly healer put forward in the Foxfire book was that the cold water drives the burn in. I reckoned however that it cooled too quick with water which in turn promoted separation and blistering of the skin. By cooling it at slightly slower rate, that extreme differential is reduced and my burns seem to blister less often. The more severe and blistered burns seem to heal as an ordinary graze type wound more rapidly when blown...

As you stated the Foxfire books (Hillbilly folk lore), much of which has been passed down from person to person. This folk lore was recorded in the Foxfire books.  Some of the lore works, some does not, and there is no proof attached.

If this were true, (cold water drives the burn in) let us start pouring cold water on our partly cooked stakes to drive the heat in and finish cooking our stakes.

It does not make sense.

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If memory serves (and granted that it's been years since I read it), the "fire drawing" method is in the chapter titled "Faith Healing".

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The American Red Cross recommends these steps to care for minor burns.

Stop the burning. Put out the flames or remove the victim from the source of the burn.  
Cool the burn. Use large amounts of water to cool the burned area. DO NOT use ice or ice water.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Glenn said:

If this were true, (cold water drives the burn in) let us start pouring cold water on our partly cooked stakes to drive the heat in and finish cooking our stakes.

It does not make sense.

Absolutely, I am sorry if it was not clear. I just mentioned what the hillbilly healer believed (as far as I remembered it from reading it 30 odd years ago) as background to my story.

What I think is as I stated. Cooling slightly less rapidly is a good thing because you do not get such a high temperature differential between flesh and skin. Not unlike your first advice to use room temperature water and not ice cold...I rationalise the effectiveness of the blowing idea on the fairly well established wind chill phenomena. I found it effective when I did not have access to water...it may help somebody else who finds themselves in the same position.

Alan

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Interestingly the UK National Health Service advice is to cool the burn with cool or lukewarm water and not ice or ice water. My cooling by blowing is not too radical a step from lukewarm water.

Alan

 

nhs.uk/Conditions/Burns-and-scalds/Pages/Treatment.aspx

First aid for burns

  • Stop the burning process as soon as possible. This may mean removing the person from the area, dousing flames with water, or smothering flames with a blanket. Don't put yourself at risk of getting burnt as well. 
  • Remove any clothing or jewellery near the burnt area of skin, including babies' nappies. However, don't try to remove anything that's stuck to the burnt skin as this could cause more damage. 
  • Cool the burn with cool or lukewarm running water for 20 minutes, as soon as possible after the injury. Never use ice, iced water, or any creams or greasy substances such as butter. 
  • Keep yourself or the person warm. Use a blanket or layers of clothing, but avoid putting them on the injured area. Keeping warm will prevent hypothermia, where a person's body temperature drops below 35C (95F). This is a risk if you are cooling a large burnt area, particularly in young children and elderly people. 
  • Cover the burn with cling film. Put the cling film in a layer over the burn, rather than wrapping it around a limb. A clean clear plastic bag can be used for burns on your hand. 
  • Treat the pain from a burn with paracetamol or ibuprofen.Always check the manufacturer's instructions when using over-the-counter medication. Children under 16 years of age should not be given aspirin
  • Sit upright as much as possible if the face or eyes are burnt.Avoid lying down for as long as possible as this will help to reduce swelling.

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9 hours ago, JHCC said:

Good to keep an aloe plant on hand, too. 

Yep, aloe is the go. Split the stem, over the burn, wrap a hanky around it. Magic.

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X2 on the aloe....I use it frequently!!!!!!!!!!!

I recall that in the old "Rawhide" western TV series (I believe it was), the chuck wagon cook, Wishbone, used to say that "it don't take me long to turn loose of a hot skillet handle!!), being cast iron of course.  Smithing, I tend to grab hot stuff other than skillet handles. :rolleyes:

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Need to get some stuff made for up coming fairs. Today I Had some fun with a ball fuller (AKA a small normalized ball pein hammer flipped over) and made a plant hanger. Also made a small coat rack with brass rivets. I punched the holes, and so I had to make a small diameter (3/16") punch. Made a large S-hook.

Towards the end of the day my dad and I mounted a post drill in my shop. Took us a year literally! I got the drill last year at the Steep Hollow forge get together which is this up coming weekend! Funny how things happen like that.

                                                                                                                            Littleblacksmith

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Wow, LittleB nice work! Consider the plant hanger idea stolen ;) Only I will use my bearing ball fuller under the PH. - It's a very versatile tool.

I've decided to pass on today's fair instead. I have to be too fit and ready Monday for two bigger commission works and for negotiations about the biggest possible commission I ever had. There is another fair next Saturday, so I can finish my stuff till then.

So no shop time just family time today :)

Gergely

 

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LB you do some really clever stuff! Nice dimpling on the hanger. I use a similar tool for the lifting tab on the bottle openers. It may find other uses now.

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Yesterday I dressed and handled a new hot punch, forged a small socket bick for the post vise, made a little froe-eye drift and attempted a heart finial on a flux spoon. The heart didn't turn out well at all, but otherwise it was the most productive day at the forge I've had in, well, too long! I also forgot to cool a pair of tongs and almost needed that aloe plant....

punch&bick.JPG

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 I played with some horse shoe nails for a bit.    Life is Good          Dave

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