littleblacksmith

What did you do in the shop today?

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Yeah Das, tried flame coloring it.   It's more visible in person,  but it still subtle.  Getting it to stay at that nice purple I saw will take some doin, that's for sure.  I left the stem and base untouched to try and contrast the petals.

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Anachronist58, I have the cheap flux core welder from harbor freight. Got it on sale for under $100. 

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Heavy rain. Cleaned up some piles of old scrap and found a bunch of these things. They are obviously cutting edges for something as they are razor sharp. Spark test indicated very high carbon. I reckon overlapped like the ones on the right, they would make convincing bird wings/tails. And they polish up well too. Golf tee to indicate size.

Any idea what they are?

blades.JPG

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Hi ausfire,they look like slitters from a belt fed line. I used to work at a rubber refinery and we used slitters like that on the extrusion line to make strips for the side walls of tires.

Some were triangular like those we also had round blades that rolled. The triangular ones were only used for certain compounds for

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If i had enough of those id make a suit of scale armor lol. 

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Hold your arms out and spin through the melee you'd be deadly;-) 

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aus, those are the replaceable teeth from a sickle bar mower. 

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11 hours ago, Anachronist58 said:

This Thread runs so fast, who can keep up with it?

Always something new every time you log in. 

That is one reason we suggest you pack a lunch and a cold drink when you visit the site. 

 

10 hours ago, Anachronist58 said:

I have no idea what possessed me to install a tuyere pipe (which is a scrap 4340 steel Boeing 737 thrust reverser piston tube) in the thing in the first place.

I do not even want to know how a Boeing 737 thrust reverser piston tube got into your resource center (scrap pile) in the first place.

Please forget I even mentioned it. There are certain things you just do not want, or need, to know. 

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Shoot my local scrap yard had a pile of jet engine parts last time I went there.  From the university I was told and I later talked with a student who had been tasked with removing asbestos from them before they went to scrap...

++on sickle bar teeth

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I want to visit YOUR scrap yard, Thomas!

It was a great source of pride when my employer destroyed an entire lot of expensive, finished parts over a "minor" deviation from specification. That is why I would consider working for that company even today. That is my kind of bottom line!

 

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What about sickle section guards? I think they are drop forged, are they good for anything?

I have been using the buzz saw like that for a couple of years. Not for the faint of heart.

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2 minutes ago, Laynne said:

What about sickle section guards? I think they are drop forged, are they good for anything?

some are Malleable cast iron...  I have never seen a forged one on older machines..  Not sure about the newer ones.. I had always assumed the newer ones were cast iron or cast steel.. 

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It's the stuff from the "Energetic Materials Research and Training Center" (can you say BOOM!) that is real fun to look at but not usually any good to re-use save that a line of pieces from when they blow up cars would work as improvised razor wire...

Laynne; I've been told they are excellent for use as sickle section guards!  Nice for yardart but a shape that doesn't lend it self for smithing reuse. 

Note they come in a variety of steel types; I've listed two from a current manufacturer's website as examples:

"Forged Steel Guards made from SAE 1016 steel are carbonitrided to achieve a thin, but extremely hard surface"

"Forged Steel Guards made from 46 Cr 2 steel (similar to SAE 5045) are also normalized prior to machining and thru-hardened to 38-44 RC. In addition, the cutting edges and the wear bars are induction hardened to 56-62 RC. T"

Old ones in the scrap stream may be a wide range of materials as well.

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Thanks for the info. They would definitely be a challenge to work with. Glad they are good for something.

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Note on the sickle sections: when was still a metallurgist, I did testing for several different "OEM" manufacturers, one used 10B38, one used 1040 and one used 1045 as I recall. I also want to say they were carburizing them, but it has been a few years. 

Very possible others use a higher carbon material, but you might check if they are through hardened or carburized before assuming they will make cutlery.

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Put kaowool in the new gas forge and rigidized it.

Firing the first layer: 

0AF166ED-5C9D-43DF-A879-4DD99D4EA7F5.jpeg

Firing the second layer, showing a nice flame swirl:

B04AB6DB-64CA-46AE-AE01-28EB8E124C6D.jpeg

View of the burner face:

8AF13EA5-6495-4051-B9C0-88F9D5143388.jpeg

Next step: hard refractory shell. 

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Man everyone has cool scrap yards except me. 

Forge is looking hot JHCC.

Also finally finished the stand with paint. Please excuse the booger welds, I'm no good at it. I'm not thrilled about the thin wall tube on the upright, but it's what I had. Once filled with sand, it became quite nice. Although oddly enough, my co worker just gave me a section of rectangle tube that's 4" x 7" and .25" wall. Wish I would of had this prior to finishing the stand. At this point I'm too lazy to redo everything. 20190204_154144.thumb.jpg.15872a880165c1680c671976cb26e326.jpg20190204_154200.thumb.jpg.3d3497ea66ed1a675ef01eac585f9d83.jpg20190204_154219.thumb.jpg.3ca4450d2846bc158f3436cebff857fc.jpg20190204_154232.thumb.jpg.f037bb6e7597e9c44a43828cc8bc41cc.jpg

 

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1 hour ago, Mudman said:

booger welds,

Now now mudman, none of THAT. The correct industry acepted term is "Chicken . . . stuff" welds though "chicken tracks" is acceptible in polite company.

I took a closer look at your vise and see it's screwed to the roller dolly? I'd go nuts worrying about tripping over the angle iron I assume are foot braces for twisting or bending against. I'd much rather just drag it across the floor even if it were dirt.

Frosty The Lucky.

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haha Chicken tracks is a good one. 

Sorry, I should have mentioned. The dolley was to make moving the vise around the garage easier, it's only temporary just to move around not use. It's been raining, so I couldn't build the stand outside. It was easier to have the dolley, vs dragging it around. The screws were to keep it from sliding, just case I happen to run over a paper clip and snag the wheel or something. Once it stops raining, I'll put it outside next to the forge and bolt to the concrete. 

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Aha! Thanks for the info about those sickle bar mower blades. We do have a few sickle bar mowers, but they are vintage types. I have used many of the long points they have as bird beaks. I think Das as used them for that too. But the ones in the picture must be the modern equivalent. We have no modern sickle bar mowers (I googled them) so I don't know how these finished up in a pile of vintage scrap.

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mudman,  From experience I'd really suggest putting a plate on the bottom, you can stand on, under it.. Those 4 angle iron legs will not last nor will they hold other than very light use.. 

There are 4 quadrants that the vise will have a tendency to be unstable on.  It's extremely top heavy..   

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8 hours ago, Mudman said:

Forge is looking hot JHCC.

Thanks, Mudman. There's one spot (on the bottom rim of the front opening) where the rigidizer didn't harden and the food coloring still shows. I'm going to fire it up again later with a steel plate or something to redirect the flame over that bit; I want to get it completely stiffened before I start in with the kastolite.

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Yay! I can finally add to this thread!

It's been nice enough to past few days weather-wise to get my propane tank out from under a tarp and put together the forge. This is the first burn. I've got the burners backwards, the rigidizer has burned off it's dye, and I need to tweak a few things but I'm getting closer!

Speaking of rigidizer. Should I apply a second coat? I still have a bunch of the fumed silica left, and I'm really not sure how rigid the kaowool should be. I plan on "painting" the wool on my next day off with the refractory they sent me with the forge, so is it really necessary to hit it again? Or should I save the rest for when the wool needs replacing?

 

20190205_135245.jpg

And I know the paving wall bricks under the forge aren't the best due to them holding moisture. But the shelf on the cart sits a little low, and it obscures about 1/4 of the opening on the forge, so I had to prop it up with something.

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Today finished another project. The fireplace is not ready yet, the hole was closed with a sofa. Chandelier installed 2 months ago.

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