littleblacksmith

What did you do in the shop today?

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Hook it up and pull it out with a vehicle if it's in a spot where that's possible.

If not jlpservices has the right idea.      

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18 hours ago, Mudman said:

Unpacking was better than Christmas.

Mudman, that post vise looks "modern"...... is it?

Loved unpacking my Fly Press Six months ago - took two hours to unpack that thing!

Robert Taylor

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It's not in a place that is really accessible for vehicles. I didn't think that a sledge would work so I didn't try, but I'll give it a go. (when in doubt...):)

Thanks!

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Is there anything near it you can anchor a towstrap and ratchet style come-along to?    . 

Or if you have a snatch block you can gain even more mechanical advantag in combination with the come along.

The snatch block would require cable or round webbing. I don't think you can thread a flat tow strap through it.  

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Get a few gallons of water boiling in a stock pot. Pour the water along the base, one sec should be enough. Then you should be able to rock said log back and forth to break it free.

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Goodidea Maxwell that sounds like it would work.    

Simple is always better     

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I just tried the sledge, and it did the trick very nicely. About a dozen good whacks and it was free. Now I feel rather silly about all my overthought leverage antics with the digging bar. I should have gone straight to the sledge!

Thank you for the suggestion! It worked like a charm. :)

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Glad to hear it went well.now get your anvil on it and your off to the races  

Once again jlpservices to the rescue.

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Think of it as breaking the ice, which is the wood to ground connection.

I have seen vehicle tires freeze to the ground and trap the vehicle. If you can break them loose, they are flat sided until you travel enough to break off the ice and the tire flexes or warms up enough to become round again.  

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My tires were frozen to the ground the other morning. Not solidly just enough that I had to give the acceleratora good push to get loose. 

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Can you damage the tires if they are real frozen to the ground ?

 

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Not if you wait for them to thaw.  You could stress the engine or transmission trying to move.

If the recap tire has poor quality adhesion, you could tear the cap.

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If it is really frozen you can tear the cords..     Around here when it gets down to the minus numbers you can feel the tires flat spot.. Its not a big deal, as pointed out just in use they will warm up enough to get round again..  But if the tires are stuck in the mud 3 or 4" and tromp on it to get the 4X4 out you can do damage..  My 7.3L diesel has more torque at idle than most gasers do at a higher rpm..    When I plow I don't even give it throttle.. This truck could tear the tires off if they were frozen deep enough.. 

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I worked a fatal tractor accident where the rear tires were frozen in mud. The operator dumped the clutch in lowest gear and the tractor flipped over backwards pinning him to the ground.

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that is such a shame..  How do you even respond to that..  You dump the clutch and in an instant..   

by the way.. It's figurative (joking) that the truck could literally rip the tires off..   the cords would break on one side of the tire and ruin the tires which would eventually lead to a failure..   When the cords break you will see a bubble on the side wall which looks different than a pinch.. 

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Finished off making this long-legged bird thing today. I call them crazy birds because they have a quizzical look. I like to be able to see the makings - my old fence pliers for the head, garden fork crest, speed brace neck, pulley block body, horse shoe wings, some old wrought bar for the legs and U bolt and bolts for the feet.

His beak has the look of a jabiru stork so I forged a small snake from threaded rod for his catch. The head rotates on the handle of the speed bar.

 

plier bird1.JPG

plier bird 2.JPG

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Cool bird, aus!

Cast the block on my ribbon burner:

50569F09-444B-4FBC-87CB-51C58A685852.jpeg

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Ausfire,cool bird. Kinda looks like a ferrousdactyl 

Jhcc, what size is the mixing tube and whatdid you use for the holes?

 

I should be more specific. What did you use for the holes in the castable?

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Wow, you move fast JHCC!  I’m still stuck where you last saw my forge.  Thankfully, I have spots opening up in my life that will allow for a little bit of shop time.  Perhaps we will both have gas forges going soon.  Can’t wait to see your first burn.  Remember that it may require adjustments once done.  You may have to back the mig tip away from the mixing tube (or file it back) to get the right burn.

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  Lou time is the most valuable commodity in The shop

 

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Anarchist58 no, from what I understand, it was dated to around the 1920's? French pattern and quite hefty. Weighs around 100lbs I believe. But my extreme curiosity led me to pick up a crane type digital scale. So I'll know better once she's weighed on it. 

Thank you jlpservicesinc, I purchased through a very kind fella on Instagram. Happened to see a post of him restoring a vise, and turns out he does it regularly. This is a 6inch French vise, one I'm not super familiar with. But the threads are crisp with no damage as far as I can tell to the internals of the bell housing. Looking forward to using it, as a tiny bench vise doesn't cut it. 

I discovered a small crack on the very end of the bell housing. After asking the seller about it, he graciously offered to replace it. But being so minor, I decided to grind it off as there was still plenty of thread on it. 

Most of my shop time was spent cutting up pieces of square tube, to build a hammer and tong rack. Then trying to piece together some scraps I had for the vise stand. Having a small 120v flux core welder has been quite a limiting factor. 

20190131_192100.thumb.jpg.d83a6eeb18d11a64c9c565936daae5d1.jpg

20190201_153316.thumb.jpg.aa6cb17cea1ee43638981654058a2113.jpg

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