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That worked pretty well! The torch cut gives an interesting edge to the petals. I like the way you notched the edge of the leaf, and the thorn is a nice touch.

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Very nice lookB)

 

 

What overall diameter did you cut the petal layers to?

 

All the diagrams I see mention the base layer being about 4" to 4 1/4" but no info about the inner petals.

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10 hours ago, Dylon M. Dollins said:

I cut the putter petal out of paper 4 1/4" then traced it again but the cut 1/4" in side the line I used only 3 blacks so the biggest was 4 1/4" and the smallest was 3 1/4" 

That makes sense. I was thinking you were 1/2 smaller each time.

Thanks.:)

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Great effect you have on the rose. I make mine out of 55gal thinner drums all dried out for a month or two. I also use 3 and 4 inch circles. Leafs are drum material too. I hand cut all my stuff to save torch gas. Then I hammer in texture on the leafs and peddles. I mig all parts together, then bend into shape. When I have everything together I torch in color on edge of leafs and rose. When cool, I clear coat the whole thing with 3 coats. When it is dry it looks as it was dipped.

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Robert: The colour on those leaves is superb. I like the shape of the sepals, and those petals are nicely overlapped. Is the clear coat like an automotive paint finish??

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Wow, that's a beautiful steel rose!
That is a kind of art you won't see much these day's.

Do you make more things like that??

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Thanks for the comments. The color is done with a pencil flame propane torch. You just touch the edge with the flame and back off when you see the blue develop. It will creep into the center and turn that straw color. The clear coat is an automotive coating. The product is called KBS clear Diamond Finish. It is pricey ($17.75) per raddle can, but worth it. You can do a lot of projects with one can. This finish likes humidity and about 70 degrees. The humidity make it cure. If you do it in a dry environment it will take forever to dry and cure. I use two coats. When cured it is hard as a rock and is hard to scratch. AND, it is a direct to metal product.  I love this stuff. It takes around 5 +/- hours to make one of these roses when you start with a 55 gallon drum.

The question was asked if I make other things. Yes I do and will post them soon.

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