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Making a gas forge- A few Questions


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My experience has been that many naturally aspirated forges drop about 20% of their possible efficiency through excess  secondary air blown into the furnace between the burner and its portal. But naturally aspirated or fan-flow, excess air never adds any hing but problems to heating equipment.

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  • 3 weeks later...


Actually, a little too much air will cool the forge more than than an equal amount of too much fuel, because the amount of air to reach too much is about five times the amount of  excess volume in an equal overabundance of  fuel, because oxygen amount is only 20% of air's content; also, it is much easier to see how much is too much fuel, because of the presence of "feather" beyond the primary flame. Too much air, only darkens the flame, and is much harder to judge.

 

That should have read "... a little too much air will cool the forge less than..."

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Finished the burner. Following John Emmerling's path with a couple of exceptions. Instead of using crayons, I used lag bolts that I was able to remove after the refractory had set. I didn't like the idea of drilling out the crayons. Also I thought the spiral left by the lag thread might aid in mixing. Additionally I chose to thread the fuel pipe in to the burner instead of welding it on just because I had the appropriate sized pipe tap available.  The excess plywood at the end of the burner form was so I could mount my orbital sander to the form tto vibrate the concrete and get rid of any air bubble easily (that worked great), I am now working on the plumbing  for the air and gas.  I will have pics of my test fire soon. In the mean time here are pics of the burner.  They are out of order but I'm pretty sure y'all can figure it out...

 

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That sounds good about the leaks.  When I first started considering building Ribbon Burners I used 1/4" round to make the holes.  I oiled them first and then was able to wiggle them out.  That casting came apart because I did not use a strong enough castable.  After that John supplied me with a ready built burner so I don't know how the 1/4" holes would have worked out.

Let me know if I can help you.

Wayne

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Burner mounted and test run. Air adjustment is a bit touchy. I'll be scouting for for a 1 1/4 inch gate valve to allow a bit finer adjustments. I currently have a blast gate over the blower intake but that is a bit crude. I was able to easily produce reducing, neutral and oxidizing flame fronts, though because of the air adjustment, the oxidizing flame was a bit unstable.  Had to shut it off after 3 minutes as IMG_2023.JPGIMG_2023.JPGIMG_2023.JPG

the structure started glowing a bit. Lol.  

Burner body had no leaks and stayed cool to the touch.  So far so good.

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On January 9, 2017 at 8:17 PM, WayneCoeArtistBlacksmith.c said:

That sounds good about the leaks.  When I first started considering building Ribbon Burners I used 1/4" round to make the holes.  I oiled them first and then was able to wiggle them out.  That casting came apart because I did not use a strong enough castable.  After that John supplied me with a ready built burner so I don't know how the 1/4" holes would have worked out.

Let me know if I can help you.

Wayne

 

Your comment made me look at it a little closer. The end of the pipe WAS touching the baffle. I think it affected the lower settings. I shortened the threaded section and added holes around the edge to make the tube part of the baffle system. After that modification I was able to get flames about half an inch long.  Prior to that, at lower pressures the ports furthest out would not fire properly.  Thanks for the thought Wayne. Checking the baffle clearance definitely helped.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Lined it with the cerachem. I found an online source for  Sodium meta silicate powder. Five pounds for $30  so I used a solution of that to assist with the installation. It went well. Test fired it. After running for an hour at a low level I cranked it up to about half way  (air gate valve) and stuck a piece of half inch re-bar in it.  The picture is of the re-bar three minutes after I put it in the forge.  Running at 2 PSI through an eighth inch orifice. I shut down after running for three hours. I figure that was a sufficient burn in.  Tomorrow I line with refractory.

 

Hot re-bar in three minutes.

Thanks to Wayne Coe for the comment about the threaded section possibly interfering with the baffle..thanks to him I took a look and  adjusted the feed pipe. It was touching the baffle and preventing lower level flames from forming properly... I fixed it and it is completely adjustable now..

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

I'm not clear. Did you line the forge entirely in hard refractory or just not show the insulating blanket refractory?  

By the pics it certainly looks to be getting hot enough. Nice job on the burner.

Frosty The Lucky.

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