No.4shot

Which one to keep?

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Two weeks ago I bought a collection of blacksmith tools.  It came with two anvils.  The first is a Hay Budden.  The serial number dates it to 1910.  It's probably between 150 to 175 pounds.

The second is a peddinghaus.  It's is stamped original PFP inside a box.  This one is heavier.  Probably closer to 200 pounds.

 

I would love to keep both, but the reality check is to be financially responsible I should only need one.  Which would you keep?

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IMG_20160806_202936_zpsiiu4l1fx.jpg

 

Thanks in advance

Mike

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Well since you will be moving around a lot and doing light work I'd keep the lighter one

Well since you will be stable and want to work on heavy forgings I'd keep the heavier one.

can you tell me if I need a dump truck or a prius?

Selling to folks that are not familiar with anvils you could probably get more for the HB as it "looks more like an anvil" .

Selling to smiths the peddinghaus would pull it's weight.

Doing ornamental work the HB's shape is handier

Doing blades or heavy forging the Peddinghaus...

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I would get a bearing and do the rebound test or at least tap them both lightly all around with a hammer to get an idea of the different tones.  I like the squat, thick anvil myself but that is because it is what I'm used to (limited experience but enough to to know my anvil pretty well).  Some of the curmudgeons will likely say, "well, that depends on what YOU intend to do for work with the anvil!" ......and they will have been correct.  A heavier anvil can support heavier work, upsetting big chunks of steel, etc...

Both seem to have nice edges based on the pictures.  You know what, it just hit me.  You are trying to be fiscally responsible. In keeping with that concept why don't you protect your investment by using both for a while and then selling the one that, after a number of sessions, you find yourself going to less.  That's what I'd do.  Plus you will have significantly added to your body of knowledge on the use of different anvils (investment #2).  Following my blinding logic, you can't afford to not use both for a while.

 

Lou

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They are both excellent anvils put them both up for sale at a *price* and sell the one that sells first.

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I personally would keep the peddinghaus as the hardy hole and pritchel whole are more supported, and would be better for what I do, although hay buddens are pretty good too.....

                                                                                                             Littleblacksmith

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Figure out how to keep them both.  Look wise you will not find better.  It is always nice to have 2, you can put them at different heights for different work.  Each will offer there own specialties.  If you must have one use them both for a month or more and sell the. One you like the least.  But use only one at a time don't switch back and forth during the month.

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I'd go for Mattos idea. I have two and use them both for different tasks. But have preference to one. As Thomas said they are both excellent anvils. I know I wouldn't give either up myself. After some forging on them for a year you'll probably figure out what you want to do. 

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As matto said, use one anvil for a month, then switch and use the second anvil for a month. Two or three cycles and one will win your heart with the projects you are doing at the time.

Much like having a car AND a truck. Both will get you to the grocery store. One can haul groceries and a ton of coal.

Clean both anvils with a wire brush and apply a protective coating to the surface. It will influence your decision. If you sell one anvil you will not find another in the same condition for the current selling price. Find projects that will pay (reimburse you) for initial cost and keep both anvils. You can always sell one at a later date.

 

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7 minutes ago, jmccustomknives said:

You'll keep both.  Money aside, having 2 anvils allows you to have one set up for a hardie tool and you can bounce between them as you work. 

Exactly, well put.

Hey, any of you guys remember this guy? http://www.biography.com/people/bhagwan-shree-rajneesh-20900613

I can remember an interview with this fellow when him and his brain dead cult followers were taking over an Oregon town where he was asked about all his Rolls Royces. Newsman asked didn't he think having 60 of them was a bit excessive? He said NO! Absolutely not! 600 of them would not be excessive!

Same can be said for anvils. Greed is good. If you decide to pursue this craft, you'll keep acquiring more. Keep both anvils and be happy with them. When it's time to grow and expand your shop you'll be ready to go.

Keep them all and look for more to buy. You'll be glad you did.

George

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1 hour ago, George Geist said:

Exactly, well put.

Hey, any of you guys remember this guy? http://www.biography.com/people/bhagwan-shree-rajneesh-20900613

I can remember an interview with this fellow when him and his brain dead cult followers were taking over an Oregon town where he was asked about all his Rolls Royces. Newsman asked didn't he think having 60 of them was a bit excessive? He said NO! Absolutely not! 600 of them would not be excessive!

Same can be said for anvils. Greed is good. If you decide to pursue this craft, you'll keep acquiring more. Keep both anvils and be happy with them. When it's time to grow and expand your shop you'll be ready to go.

Keep them all and look for more to buy. You'll be glad you did.

George

George is correct, if you lived closer to me I would be trying to get you to sell both of the anvils to add to my stash. if you can, I would suggest you hold on to both of them, down the road you'll be sorry you sold one.

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Thanks for all the sound advice.  I already oiled and wire brushed them.  That was the first thing I did when I got them home.  My main interest is blade smithing.  Although I would like to learn general smithing first to learn more.  But I have been making knives going on three years now using stock removal.  For the last 6 months I have been working with a gentleman learning how to forge knives.  I recently found another local guy to teach me general blacksmith techniques.

Anyways I really like the idea of keeping both.  Like had been said both are in way better condition than I have been seeing locally.  Plus I got a great deal from this guy because it was a buy it all or none type deal.  On the other hand it would be nice to recoup some of my money.

So following your adviceth is I got some other tools in the deal that I am gonna start selling first.  Try them both out then make a decision.  Thanks again

Mike

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sell plasma, keep anvils?   And you will need a small one for travelling with and for a slim heel for certain tasks...

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I'm in the keep them both group as well.  If I had to sell one it would be the Hay Budden for two reasons.  First I like the Peddinghaus configuration better for the type of forging I do, and second because it appears that right now Hay Budden's are the current "fad" anvil and their prices seem to be disproportionately high.

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1 hour ago, Latticino said:

I'm in the keep them both group as well.  If I had to sell one it would be the Hay Budden for two reasons.  First I like the Peddinghaus configuration better for the type of forging I do, and second because it appears that right now Hay Budden's are the current "fad" anvil and their prices seem to be disproportionately high.

This is proven if you google both names.  Hay Budden returns with way more hits.

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Recoup your costs by selling items you make on them. I would keep both for a few reasons; condition, size, makers, bartering material, different jobs may need different anvils, use as a loaner, etc...

I have 8 myself from 50#-306#

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If I were in your place I'll keep both until I could swap the HB to a double horned Peddinghaus or another double horned anvil.

if you have one anvil, you can work everything on it, if you have two (different patterns, sizes) and work on them, you ask yourself how you was able to work on just one anvil. and that's true with the double horned anvils - once you get one, you cannot imagine the life without it, especially for ornamental work, but not only for that. if you get a double horned one, you'll find yourself working mostly on that rather than on a London pattern one.

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I'd keep the Pendinghous if there was an absolute need to get rid of one.  I prefer a thick waist and heel on my anvils, and the Pendinghous anvils are solid chunks of cast steel.  No swayback and the edges look nice and sharp....  you just don't get better than that.

However, having two anvils is a great thing even if you're just a hobby smith starting to learn the trade.  Put the HB anvil on the ground and you can use it as an upsetting block.  Put the Pendinghous on a low stand and you can use it with a sledge to make tooling (and not worry about the heel popping off).  Keep the lighter anvil on a lighter stand so you can transport it around, doing the show circuit around your house.

Plenty of reasons to have two good anvils in the shop.  I'd be inclined to hold on to it and try recouping my money by making things to sell.  Candleholders, hooks, scrolls.... there are a ton of things you can make and sell at local shops.

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I'm definitely on board with keeping both , make beautiful things on them, sell them , there's your money back and you still have 2 awesome anvils........you'll be extremely hard pressed to find them again , both in great shape , I keep telling myself that every anvil has its own purpose , I need to maybe stop thinking that way........running out of room :P 

my recent acquisition a 164lb Mouse......didn't need it but I definitely had to have it !!  

image_zpscsilkaz3.jpeg

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I managed to recently talk myself out of a local anvil at under $2 a pound.  I have better ones than it was and folks new to the craft need decent anvils at an affordable price...

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On 8/17/2016 at 6:45 AM, No.4shot said:

Thanks for all the sound advice.  I already oiled and wire brushed them.  That was the first thing I did when I got them home.  My main interest is blade smithing.  Although I would like to learn general smithing first to learn more.  But I have been making knives going on three years now using stock removal.  For the last 6 months I have been working with a gentleman learning how to forge knives.  I recently found another local guy to teach me general blacksmith techniques.

Anyways I really like the idea of keeping both.  Like had been said both are in way better condition than I have been seeing locally.  Plus I got a great deal from this guy because it was a buy it all or none type deal.  On the other hand it would be nice to recoup some of my money.

So following your adviceth is I got some other tools in the deal that I am gonna start selling first.  Try them both out then make a decision.  Thanks again

Mike

Since they are both oiled up, stump mount them both on nice oiled wood.  Reinforce the alternating monthly usage; keep the extra in the living room to remind you each morning to get to the forge & hit hot steel.

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16 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

I managed to recently talk myself out of a local anvil at under $2 a pound.  I have better ones than it was and folks new to the craft need decent anvils at an affordable price...

Know what you mean.  Did the same at a recent blacksmith gathering when a guy drove up with an anvil in his truck bed and I was the first one over to check out his tailgate sales items.  He had a Fisher ~125# farrier pattern with some rough edges and top surface damage, but still quite usable for around $120.  I was going to grab it, just to use either as an upsetting block or for the hardy hole, but a young man stepped up and I could see the anvil lust in his eyes, so I let him have it with the proviso that he wasn't just going to just try to offload it on e-bay, but actually use it to set up his shop.

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