Jump to content
I Forge Iron

Recommended Posts

50 minutes ago, gote said:

Interesting tip. I would never have thought about it. I would be afraid to lose the residual heat that allows me to clean up the cut without an extra heat. Will try it.

It is only dipped momentarily so you remove very little heat from the workpiece. The small thermal mass of the ismuth relative to the workpiece means it chills (and reheats) very rapidly

Speed is key.

If you hold the soon-to-be cut off piece in your tongs when you pop it in the water you lose no time and do not allow the ismuth to reheat. If I am cutting a waste piece off I often just plunge in and then bang the bar on the edge of the water tub to knock it off...you have to watch that though because some times it manages to come off on the rebound and come visit! You may realise how I know that. :)

Alan

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
  • 5 months later...
  • 1 month later...

Yah I think the shank of the hardy needs to be a bit taller so the shoulders sit above the top of the anvil. I made a cut off just like that and I got stuck like that also, I forge another one and it had taller shoulders its snug but just a tap and it pops out.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 7 months later...
On 8/27/2016 at 9:45 AM, Alan Evans said:

When using a hot cut I find it advantageous to plunge the workpiece into the water bucket for a second or two, after hitting it down onto the hot cut, the only bit that is chilled is the ismuth left from the part cut, and because it is cold the end will break off clean rather than having to bend and twist with your tongs. You obviously have to be a bit quick or the residual heat will travel back into the ismuth almost as quickly.

With this method you do not need to risk going so close to the hot set with the hammer face. 

A straight edged hot set will produce a parallel strip/hinge/ismuth which will break cleaner and more readily than the hinge left by a curved edge hot set. The more ragged edge left by the curved tool will require a few more blows to clean up and consolidate. But probably not enough difference between them in the real world to worry anyone. 

Alan

This is exactly how I was taught to cut.

It is so much easier.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 years later...
  • 5 months later...

I made this "hot cut" before I knew anything about hot cuts. It's a chunk of draglink from my pickup.  It's soft enough to not mar the hammer if I should hit one too many times.  If it gets dulled, it's easy enough to fix with a few licks from a file.  I've cut leaf spring, up to 1 1/4" round, and square stock, both HC, and mild.  As long as the steel is hot, it will cut.

hot cut.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...