Mikey98118

Forges 101

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Thanks Slag. I know this isn't your field of law but figured you could point us in the right direction far better than guessing. 

Re reading the article I see I misremembered what the explosive materials were. I doubt ATF, NSA, etc. will get involved this is just idiot doings, I doubt the King of ran DUMB could pull off a terrorist act of any note. The kind of thing a good hard SLAP and record might work on. 

Well maybe, If I were a parent and I discovered my teen age boy watching his video channel I'd be pretty terrified so maybe the term terrorist might be appropriate. I just doubt he's interested in anything but stroking his own self image and a few minutes of fame.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Mr. Frosty,

Strongly agree.

Regards,

SLAG.

Yes the lad is probably stroking his own ego; but he just may also be stroking his fanny goodbye.

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I read back through the pages 15-20something where there was discussion about Veegum and Zircopax as a reflecting replacement for the ITC-100 type products.  I found these materials at Seattle Pottery Supply, as indicated.  What I haven't yet understood is the mixing proportions.  What ratio of Veegum:Zircopax is recommended?  I assume you just paint it on a bit thinner than toothpaste thick, on top of your castable?

 

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Well dang, one more page back.  I didn't see the molochite grog in the pages after that, with all the rest of the references to just the V/Z.  Would a regular castable refractory work in its place?

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4 hours ago, Jason Fry said:

Would a regular castable refractory work in its place?

Yes, but not as well. Also, by upping the amount of Veegum from3.5 % to 5% the formula turns from a refractory into a suitable thin coating material.

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Thanks, Mikey. I may post a few pics for feedback as I build.  I've built this forge twice now over 4 years or so, and also have a vertical in progress as well.  Used Mike's book for burner design, and have a 1/2 and a 3/4 that work well. I'm likely to stick with the 3/4 for the horizontal, and build a blown burner for the vertical welding forge.  I have welded in the horizontal with the 3/4, but want a dedicated welding forge. FWIW, I'm a knifemaker with 10 years experience.

We have a local refractory place that sells Pilbrico products.  The guy there suggested a light castable for the whole thing, with a reflective coating, hence my search for the zircopax ITC alternative.  He suggested that the wool products are less suited for the task.  Given that I melted the wool on my last two attempts, although it was from an oil refinery and I didn't know the rating, and given that I don't have time to constantly rebuild things, I figured I'd give the castable a try this time.  Not having to pay shipping on a 55# bag makes it economically worth the effort. 

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I have maintained for the last twenty years that there is no such thing as the perfect burner, any more than one shoe size fits all. The last two years have seen many new burners that I honestly admire. That said, people should proceed with their eyes wide open, because, burner or forge, "when you do what you don't understand; that's when you suffer."   :unsure:

I think that a 1/2" thick hot-face layer, with 2" of ceramic blanket insulation is a very good way to build a forge; it isn't the only way, but it is a solid way to go.

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Shielding from infrared burns

Various members of IFI have listed reasons for using adjustable exterior baffle walls (ex, brick walls) just beyond exhaust exits on forges: Keeping radiant heat from escaping the forge, while allowing spent gas to exit; shielding the blacksmith from the blast of exhaust gas; and now we see the smith needs shielding from infrared burns on eyes and skin.

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I have done a lot of welding in a t shirt and thermonuclear grade sunblock. The only time I ever burned my eyes was the one day I left my glasses for repairs and went to work.  No scientific basis to either but I hear melanoma really sux and I can say that burnt eyes are kind of like rubbing a slurry of sand, salt and dish soap in them.

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I have a friend who is very tired of having surgery for melanoma, and all he did was spend too much beach time in his youth. Of course, that was UV rather than IR. But common sense never goes out of style; neither does bemoaning our youthful mistakes in old age. "Too soon we grow old, and too late we grow smart." I'm betting on young people to be a lot smarter than I was...

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I teach college students on a regular basis and so: No I'm afraid not....(the colleges new "knifemaking club" has managed to get kicked out of a MatSci Prof's forge and the one at the Fine Arts Metals classroom, breaking welds on the treadlehammer, damaging tongs and hammer and anvil faces, damage to the forge...whatever happened to folks taking extra special care when they were using borrowed equipment? They now are forced to make or purchase their own...)

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When I was a youngster, "it only took a few rotten apples to spoil the barrel." That will never change. how we react to them is up to us, just as it was to our grandparents.

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I'm with you about flash burning my eyes Howlingdog, only did that once before I learned a few tricks to keep other arc flashes from getting me from behind. 

People are people we don't really value things we didn't earn,  makes respecting other people's stuff a stretch. Treating other people's property better than you treat your own has to be taught, the earlier the better.

How I react to someone depends on how I perceive their actions. Carelessness and not knowing any better are reasons they come to me to learn. Repeated or deliberate abuse gets em 86d and it's not a surprise, I tell everybody I teach up front. It's one of the cardinal rules in my shop. Everybody misses and on occasion I hand someone a draw file to sharpen the hardy or hot set. Some folk take a little effort to learn to aim.

Some learn, some don't, some won't. I show the door to the ones who won't.

Frosty The Lucky.

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I call them disposable people, they consider everything to be disposable. Good example is someone that wants to borrow the 9/16" inch wrench I bought in 1977 because he can't find,lost, left  his someplace and has parts of 5 sets in his box, on the floor, in his truck. in the back of his truck. They have no sense of value for their own property and I have to imagine even less for mine. I think this is what Harbor Freight's business plan is based on, make it cheep enough that it can be used for one project and discarded. I have bought tools at HF with the idea that I just don't use something enough to own a good one and am pleasantly surprised if the occasion  to use it again arises and it still works.

 

 

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Twenty years ago I gave away my Makita power tools, and replaced them with Harbor Freight, just to keep my stuff from walking off the job; I had to work with these kinds of monkeys at the time. The only thing worse than their disrespect of your tools is when they like them.

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Reminds me of days gone by when I had to rent stall space to work on my old pickup. I had my own tools but the rental stall place rented tools for folks who didn't. Well, it was pretty common for folk to just grab someone else's tool rather than walk all the way to the box they rented. I complained to the guy working there, a partner in the business and he just shrugged his shoulders.

The favorite tool to "borrow" was my swivel head 3/8" ratchet. So I made a point of keeping the little wheeled tool box, part cart that came with the stall within sight at all times and stopped preventing guys from taking my ratchet. I made sure to pull the socket, extension, etc. though. I'd watch till they laid it down, go get it and drop the socket, extension, etc. they were renting in my box.

I was there at closing one evening and mentioned it to the guy there. He said nobody ever said anything, just paid for lost tools and left, then he pointed at a corner where he swept all the dropped, lost, missing, tools. He'd spend a good hour every night after closing sorting: wrenches, sockets, punches, screw drivers, nips, wire strippers, pliers, etc. etc. back where they belong and into boxes of extras. Said they hardly actually LOST a tool, the patrons just never put them back and returned them for the deposit. Said they made good money on deposits and regularly held lost tool sales seems folk left their own tools at least as often. I usually filled at least a socket index per hour. I was almost making money.

Does that make me a selfish . . . what you called Mikey, Howlingdog?:)

Frosty The Lucky.

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I do hope Mikey didn't take that the wrong way. Had a note on my last post that it would have to be approved by a moderator. I guess I shall have to curb my sarcasm.

 

And please call me Dog , it's shorter.

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Yup they will fit you with a curb bit here if you don't take care. On the other hand I can direct kids here without worrying that their parents will get shocked. 

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We all get the occasional reminder to keep the language G rated, we can get a bit loony toons and slip a PG coment in on occasion but I side with Glenn, he wants everyone from grand kids to grand parent to feel comfortable here

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Two Daughters and now 8 grandkids and a wife willing to enforce me *not* teaching them some of the things in my vocabulary...As she says "You gotta sleep sometime!"

So workarounds: "May maledictions follow this nameless thing to the uttermost depths of world slime!"  (RAH)  Or the old BSG favorite "felgarcarb". And of course almost any phrase in German sounds like you are cussing when it is said with emphasis: "Ich möchte ein Einzelzimmer mit Bad im ersten Stock!"  ("Star Smashers of the Galaxy Rangers" where it's translated as: I spotted a door behind the throne, so grab onto me and we can escape that way.")

Here; rereading your post before you hit Save helps a lot...  (but sometimes things slip through----"Das is nicht mein hut!)

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