Mikey98118

Forges 101

Recommended Posts

To weld or not to weld; that is the question

Gee whiz Batman. How can we compete with those lucky guys with MIG welders? Life is so hard!!!

Not so much; unless those "lucky" guys also no what they are doing, they are very likely to weld up a frame that will warp badly in short order. Back before hydraulic machinery became ubiquitous in steel shops, one of a Burner's jobs was shaping difficult steel parts, like angle, with heat. When angles are left exposed to forge temperatures in the combustion chamber, while their outside legs are open to air cooling, a perfect receipt for warping is created. Welding can't stop the steel from warping, it can only make repairs harder to make.

Most warping takes place at around 400 degrees

Steel sheet that is welded rigidly in place can't move sufficiently during heating cycles, resulting in warpage. So, why don't tunnel forges made of steel tubing, or oval forges warp? Because, round surfaces have flex built into them; sheet and angles don't. So how do all those steel box forges keep from warping? They are designed to allow the steel parts to move were they need to.

So do we forget welding? No we carefully examine the construction those kind of forges, before reaching for a MIG gun!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Folks,

i found another IR heat reflective coating at a price 1/2 of the ITC .

Hybrid Burners sells it by the pint, it’s called HYB-UV IR reflective coating, claims to reflect up to 98% of the IR energy, said they had a refractory company formulate it for them so they could offer an effective cheaper alternative to ITC.

I bought a pint (it’s in transit)and will be using it in my first gasser which I’m building now from a Freon bottle, and 2” 2600* HP 8lb wool (I found a full box at work being thrown out). I have my Kastolite 30 and silica Rigidizer on hand, and a 3/4” burner I’d obtained before I learned from this thread that a quality 1/2” was sufficient. Last item I need to buy k26 bricks for movable doors, and either kiln shelves or materials to make the same for my floor. I’m getting antsy, it’s been over 20 years since I’ve done any smithing, and that was with good old bituminous and charcoal. Anyways, I will post pics when I’m done and anything I learn about the hybrid reflective coating.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, I looked up the SDS on Plistix 900, which I’ve read folks here state as having a high zirconium content.

Per the SDS, it is 94.1% alumina oxide, 1.7% silicon oxide, remainder unstated. Per this, it can’t be ZrO2, or at least any more than about 4%, but that would mean there’s also no binders, etc.14F51A46-E854-44D3-8F4B-935F2F301851.thumb.png.7235693a471067da4a23d08152e44a35.pnge

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mike!

The Plibrico data sheet I included is for the Plistix 900 that others sell and recommend as the ITC100 alternative. As of yet I don’t know who makes the coating I bought from Hybrid, or what’s in it. I’m hoping the packaging gives me more info when it gets here Monday. Regardless i will post results once I use it, but it’s unfortunate I don’t have any reference or experience to compare it to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now