Jaredciz

Devil forges connection kit/ hose

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So here is what happened:

I have recently bought a $130 Devil Forge (I got this one). Now after I ordered it, I realized that this doesn't have a connection kit( no hose, regulator, valve) and I need one. What I was thinking do can do is get a regulator, a hose, and a gasket. Clamp the hose onto the burner using the gasket, then connect the hose to the regulator, regulator to the tank. Since these guys are from Europe it's kinda hard to contact them. So would my idea work? If not, what world work and where can I buy it? Welding supply, propane store? I need to know what will work and where to get what I need to connect the burner to the tank. :)

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So you in Mexico like I am right now? Or Australia or CHile or?

Not knowing what country you are in makes it hard to suggest where you need to go to get them.

And yes as long as the connections are made correctly and safely it doesn't matter where you get the items needed.

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Gasket...gasket? "We don't need no stinking gasket!" Sorry; couldn't resist:P

Seriously though; what you want is a worm screw hose clamp; cheap, easy, and dependable; buy them anywhere auto parts are sold. Proceed to cut one end off of the hose of your choice, stick it on the burner fitting, and proceed to hook up your regulator the easy way.

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30 minutes ago, Mikey98118 said:

Gasket...gasket? "We don't need no stinking gasket!" Sorry; couldn't resist:P

Seriously though; what you want is a worm screw hose clamp; cheap, easy, and dependable; buy them anywhere auto parts are sold. Proceed to cut one end off of the hose of your choice, stick it on the burner fitting, and proceed to hook up your regulator the easy way.

Cool thanks! Now all I need is a high pressure regulator and hose. What pressure should I get? 

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My favorite propane hose is 1/4" twin torch lead. You cut off the brass guards at both ends, and it  pulls right apart. You need to get "T" grade, which is for multiple fuels. Do not get "R" grade, which is only for acetylene.

And why go this rout, instead of regular black propane hose? Because torch lead has been around for over a century, as part of the steel industry. there has been a long time for a lot of competitors to maximize everything about this product. You get a lower price on a much better grade of hose. Propane hose tends to be stiff and overpriced because it comes out of a way smaller marketplace; appliance parts.

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As for the regulator, I like 0 to 30 on my equipment (unless I'm testing a new burner design, and then I test all the way to sixty), but 0 to 20 is probably all you would use with that forge; if  you get much higher than 12 PSI in use I'll be surprised.

The first thing you want to change on that forge is the tube that burner is setting in. You want to add a large flat washer over the burner body, so that it slides down over over the end of the pipe it sets in. You do this in order to controll secondary air infiltration into the forge, which can lover forge temperature 20%.

Once you get the  brick walls placed at both ends of the forge, and become familiar with how the forge runs, it becomes time to take a closer look at the washer. You will want to get a pair of needle nose pliers, and use it to run the washer up and down near the tube end, and watch to see if there are blue exit flames from the exhaust. If you need to keep the washer a little way from the tube end, in order to stop blue exhaust flames from exiting the forge, do so. That seems to be a pretty fair burner, but it may need some secondary air for the forge to burn clean; that's fine. You just don't want excess secondary air.

 

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Isn't a hose clamp a little bit dangerous, in canada I know it's ''against the law'' to attach your hose with that. I found a thread that mentionned an american store with all the piece you need but I can't find the thread anymore unfortunately.

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No, this particular hose clamp is not the slightest bit dangerous; as to what Canadian law says; you are on your own. Dealing with all the crap my own legal system comes up with is quite depressing enough, thank you very much...

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On 2016-06-01 at 0:18 AM, Mikey98118 said:

No, this particular hose clamp is not the slightest bit dangerous; as to what Canadian law says; you are on your own. Dealing with all the crap my own legal system comes up with is quite depressing enough, thank you very much...

I just don't think it's really sealed, I'm afraid to try it and start an explosion or something, I Know if it's really tight it should be ok. but you never know and I don't want to be in the news paper for being the dumb ass who exploded in his garage

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I spent several years fixing torch hose failures from the brass fittings that come from "approved" repair kits. Unlike fittings that are pressed in place by a hydraulic crimping machine, these repair kit fittings would gradually open over time; permitting the hoses to come loose.

Most apliance hose clamps are made of spring wires, that will cause torch hose to tear; because they create pressure points for tears to begin at. Hydraulically crimped brass hose ferrules spread the pressure over a wide area. Worm gear hose clamps also spread pressure over a wide area; and while that pressure can be adjusted to exactly where you want it, it doesn't back off over time.

If a fella is so cursed as to live someplace that doesn't permit their use, then he has only two legal options left; the first is to try to persuade some company with a hydraulic crimping machine to place his hose in position on the barbed pipe fitting (lots of luck with that); the other one is to use a fuel gas approved adhesive on the barbed fitting before clamping the hose and the crappy third rate kit ferrule in place. But the fella doesn't need to feel bad about the deal; he can still use a worm gear clamp every now and then to crush the kit ferrule back into place.

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On 2016-06-04 at 11:59 PM, Charles R. Stevens said:

Soapy water in a spray bottle has been the tool of choice for diagnosing gas leaks for years, certainly beats matches... 

Haha good one, I knew the trick but I was afraid of making a absurdity. Thanks

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Around here our local auto parts store makes up hydraulic and AC hoses with crimped fittings, but we are both and oil & gas and farming area. Try your local tractor dealership, local real parts house or shop that specializes in hydraulic hose assemblies for me they have been accommodating when retrofitting newer components into older trucks.  

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2 hours ago, Mikey98118 said:

I spent several years fixing torch hose failures from the brass fittings that come from "approved" repair kits. Unlike fittings that are pressed in place by a hydraulic crimping machine, these repair kit fittings would gradually open over time; permitting the hoses to come loose.

Most apliance hose clamps are made of spring wires, that will cause torch hose to tear; because they create pressure points for tears to begin at. Hydraulically crimped brass hose ferrules spread the pressure over a wide area. Worm gear hose clamps also spread pressure over a wide area; and while that pressure can be adjusted to exactly where you want it, it doesn't back off over time.

If a fella is so cursed as to live someplace that doesn't permit their use, then he has only two legal options left; the first is to try to persuade some company with a hydraulic crimping machine to place his hose in position on the barbed pipe fitting (lots of luck with that); the other one is to use a fuel gas approved adhesive on the barbed fitting before clamping the hose and the crappy third rate kit ferrule in place. But the fella doesn't need to feel bad about the deal; he can still use a worm gear clamp every now and then to crush the kit ferrule back into place.

Wow ok thank you for all those information, I may try it then, I know rules are made for dumb people who doesn't know what they do, but you know, it's gas so I didn't want to take too much risk haha. Thanks

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For the most part rules are their for a good reason, but some times they are there to make some dumb person feel important. It's up to you to do enugh research to know the difference. 

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Charles,

Just so:) Although we in the shipyards used to love to complain about safety rules, I never actually came across one that was senseless; aggravating and inconvenient for sure; but not senseless.

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Maybe living in a place where even the cities are relatively remote by lower 48 standards has advantages, only the lowest end auto parts stores don't have hydraulic hose crimping equipment on really rare occasions I've seen the old school screw crimpers. Almost any town with more than 1k people has a hose and rubber supplier where you can find anythiing from conveyor belting to hydraulic lines you can stick your fist in.

Didn't someone just recently post about the dangers of using "Soapy" water for testing torch hose? Soap and oxy under pressure make an explosively interesting combination. There are leak detector solutions that are safe and available at welding and most hose/rubber suppliers.

Frosty The Lucky.

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7 hours ago, Charles R. Stevens said:

You haven't met the "new and improved college educated" rule maker... 

Have you ever met a, "risk management" Boffin trying to invent a safety device for a piece of equipment he knows nothing about? Now stack that joker filled deck with the caveat he's a Government, Risk Management Boffin. On one occasion we actually had to damage our drill to prove the new safety "improvement" was so dangerous as to be criminal.

Frosty The Lucky.

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23 hours ago, Charles R. Stevens said:

For the most part rules are their for a good reason, but some times they are there to make some dumb person feel important. It's up to you to do enugh research to know the difference. 

haha thanks!

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On May 30, 2016 at 4:17 PM, Jaredciz said:

So here is what happened:

I have recently bought a $130 Devil Forge (I got this one). Now after I ordered it, I realized that this doesn't have a connection kit( no hose, regulator, valve) and I need one. What I was thinking do can do is get a regulator, a hose, and a gasket. Clamp the hose onto the burner using the gasket, then connect the hose to the regulator, regulator to the tank. Since these guys are from Europe it's kinda hard to contact them. So would my idea work? If not, what world work and where can I buy it? Welding supply, propane store? I need to know what will work and where to get what I need to connect the burner to the tank. :)

UPDATE!

where would I be able to purchase this in store, would granger be good? By the way I looked up the twin leaded hose, I don't think I need that much, because it has two. Also how do I hook it it up to the regulator?

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One of the twin leads is an oxygen line with right hand thread ends (all fuel hose use left handed thread on their fittings), and that hose isn't rated for fuels. As to being too long a line, such hose comes in as little as 12 foot lengths. Usually the oxygen hose gets used for gas lines on wire feed welders afterward.

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