Jump to content
I Forge Iron

manufacturing process of fencing blades


Recommended Posts

Hi,

I am a student and I have a project about fencing weapons. I need to learn the manufacturing route of process. I have to fing a detailed information of the production of the blades. In spite of all effort I cannot reach enough information such as heat treatment all forging. Are there anyone who informe me ? Please help me because it is so important

Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you look at the knife or sword, or heat treating sections on this site? Lots of information  there.

May want to add your location as there may be blacksmiths or bladesmiths in your area.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Try calling a fencing school and asking who the manufacturers of the swords they use are. Then try contacting the manufacturer. Just do NOT expect to get very much information, every company will have proprietary methods, (secret) and they aren't going to share. However they may be willing to give you some general information. Fencing, "Sporting" swords are made to very strict performance standards.

You may be able to fulfill your report requirements if you can explain the performance specifications, what that means and why they are so important. How sport swords perform and more importantly how they fail is FAR more important than how they are made.

Frosty The Lucky.

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Rashelle said:

You can look up maraging steel.

thank you
I read a lot of things about them. As I learned the weapons made from maraging is generally used in international competitons. But I try to find someting about middle quality blades which made from spring steels. I wondered the shaping of blades and also some parameters of process. Unfortunately I cannot. 

15 hours ago, Glenn said:

Did you look at the knife or sword, or heat treating sections on this site? Lots of information  there.

May want to add your location as there may be blacksmiths or bladesmiths in your area.

Firstly thank you for response 

Yes I checked most of them. I am student of metallurgical engineering in Istanbul/ Turkey. When I reserached I noticed that there is no systematic production in our country. I sent message to producer of blades in different countries but no reply . 

Link to post
Share on other sites

You may not be able to find the information you seek easily as each company will have proprietary materials and methods, (secret) and they aren't going to share. Contact a school that teaches fencing or  the use of those weapons and the older folks may be able to guide you to the information you seek or at least add some information as to how they are made or from what materials.

You have chosen a very specific and very narrow topic.  The information you seek may be difficult to find.

Fencing was part of the Olympics Games in the summer of 1896. Sabre events have been held at every Summer Olympics; foil events have been held at every Summer Olympics except 1908; Épée events have been held at every Summer Olympics except in the summer of 1896 because of unknown reasons.

There are three weapons in modern fencing: foil, épée, and sabre. Each weapon has its own rules and strategies.

Foil

Main article: Foil (fencing)

The foil is a light thrusting weapon with a maximum weight of 500 grams. The foil may target the torso (including the back), neck, and groin, but not the arms or legs. The foil has a small circular hand guard that serves to protect the hand from direct stabs. As the hand is not a valid target in foil, this is primarily for safety. Touches are scored only with the tip; hits with the side of the blade do not count, and do not halt the action. Touches that land outside of the target area (called an off-target touch) stop the action, but are not scored. Only a single touch can be scored by either fencer at one time. If both fencers land valid touches at the same time, the referee uses the rules of "right of way" to determine which fencer gets the point. If both fencers begin their attack at the same time, or the referee is unable to determine who was first, neither fencer scores a point.

Épée

Main article: Épée

The épée is a thrusting weapon like the foil, but heavier, with a maximum total weight of 775 grams. In épée, the entire body is valid target. The hand guard on the épée is a large circle that extends towards the pommel, effectively covering the hand, which is a valid target in épée. Like foil, all hits must be with the tip and not the sides of the blade. Hits with the side of the blade do not halt the action. As the entire body is legal target, there is no concept of an off-target touch, except if the fencer accidentally strikes the floor, setting off the electric tone. Unlike foil and sabre, épée does not use "right of way", and allows simultaneous hits by both fencers. However, if the score is tied in a match at the last point and a double touch is scored, the point is null and void.

Sabre

Main article: Sabre (fencing)

The sabre is a light cutting and thrusting weapon that targets the entire body above the waist, except the weapon hand. Like the foil, the maximum legal weight of a sabre is 500 grams. The hand guard on the sabre extends from pommel to the base of where the blade connects to the hilt. This guard is generally turned outwards during sport to protect the sword arm from touches. Hits with the entire blade or point are valid. As in foil, touches that land outside of the target area are not scored. However, unlike foil, these off-target touches do not stop the action, and the fencing continues. In the case of both fencers landing a scoring touch, the referee determines which fencer receives the point for the action, again through the use of "right of way".

Fencing is governed by Fédération Internationale d'Escrime (FIE). Today, its head office is in Lausanne, Switzerland.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 years later...
On 5/22/2016 at 1:14 AM, naliyeva said:

Hi,

I am a student and I have a project about fencing weapons. I need to learn the manufacturing route of process. I have to fing a detailed information of the production of the blades. In spite of all effort I cannot reach enough information such as heat treatment all forging. Are there anyone who informe me ? Please help me because it is so important

Hi, 

I know you did those research a long ago, but I am doing similar research. Did you find what wanted? And if yes, could you tell me? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...