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Hello,

Just today I bought another anvil, this time one that is MUCH larger than my current PW. This thing is pretty dang big.'m not sure what maker it is or what weight it is. All the markings are gone except a serial number 72131 and a 8 1 on the front foot. I believe this would mean HB or Trenton as A&H serial numbers don't go this high right? There may be more markings on the foot I just can't tell. This thing is in amazing shape, I haven't touched it, if I took a wire brush and some soap to it, it would be much easier to potentially see markings. I really don't know the weight, I do know one guy could not carry this thing though. I have attached pictures of the anvil, its size, and markings. 

Could you guys help me figure out the weight and the maker? 

Thanks! 

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Flour or white powder didn't show any markings on the side(s) after a GENTLE wire brushing with a hand brush?

Man, I wish those old blacksmiths would quit testing their chisels and punches on the anvils!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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I would guess around 3 cwt range  based on the tape measure and what I have seen shopping around for one

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Could be kind of a fun forum "game" to set up some sort of "guess the weight" with specific parameters like only a standard 1 liter bottle to use for reference in the photo.  Just a random thought for a rainy day...might help develop better estimating skills for people anvil shopping unmarked anvils too.

My guess on this one was about 325#

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Yes, looks like a PW, a bit of the weight numbers are still visible on the side with the horn facing right. The serial number on the left front foot looks to have been stamped by Hay-Budden, it's their font and size. Most likely repaired by them, they put their serial number on repairs. In that case the repair was done around 1901 per AIA.

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19 hours ago, arkie said:

Flour or white powder didn't show any markings on the side(s) after a GENTLE wire brushing with a hand brush?

Man, I wish those old blacksmiths would quit testing their chisels and punches on the anvils!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

1 hour ago, 101 H-B said:

Yes, looks like a PW, a bit of the weight numbers are still visible on the side with the horn facing right. The serial number on the left front foot looks to have been stamped by Hay-Budden, it's their font and size. Most likely repaired by them, they put their serial number on repairs. In that case the repair was done around 1901 per AIA.

Thank you everyone for the replies. I haven't gotten around to scrubbing it down and putting flour on the sides to check, I'm going to this weekend. The consensus seems that its a PW but 101 HB you say you think it's a HB repair? I agree the number definitely look like HB. Is there anyway you can describe where you see the weight numbers? I can't make anything out in the picture. For the weight, I'm thinking it's 300+ lbs from general dimension to weight charts and others have said so as well. 

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I see something on the right and left at the waist, circled, where a weight number might be. Not sure, but maybe.

Wt # circled.jpg

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I could be wrong but I had not heard of a peter wright with serial numbers stamped  on the front feet normally just a letter on each foot.

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101-HB is correct, a number of the American wrought iron anvil makers did overhauls on the English anvils after they developed sway and broken edges. ai would assume the y would identify the anvil by some method such as numbering them after the remanufacturing process was complete. With all those handling holes it has to be wrought, not cast.

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let me tell you my secret method of getting an exact weight on an anvil----I weigh it!  If it's larger than my bathroom scale; well there is a nice scale at the scrap yard, one at the feed stores, one at the propane place, one at the vets, shoot I've even used the scales at the truck stop before.  I know all those calibrated and certified scales take all the mystery out of it and is often faster and easier than guessing on the internet.

After you weigh it on a calibrated and certified scale  you can take you punches and add the *CORRECT* WEIGHT to the anvil

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