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is this the right tuyere for this forge? I have searched and searched for a good image of the tuyere for this type of forge and haven't seen anything that looks common. The way this sits on here it wouldn't see to work as efficiently as one that would sit flat and seal the air blowing around the edges. Maybe I am wrong as I am just starting. If this isn't correct please let me know. Please post a pic if you have a forge like this and the tuyere is different. 

 

This is is the way it came.

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This is is with the tuyere flipped over.

image.jpg

 

 

Close up up of the raised design.

image.jpg

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Greetings Rmartin, 

Both will work just fine.. If you are searching for perfection stop and fire it up and have fun.. I have many small forges and  they are all slightly different . 

Forge on and make beautiful things

Jim

 

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Actually, I believe that is a grate- the tuyere is the piping underneath. Anyway, that looks like it may be a repurposed grate from a floor drain. Take a grinder to it so it drops in the hole and fire it up.

Steve

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1 hour ago, Jim Coke said:

Greetings Rmartin, 

Both will work just fine.. If you are searching for perfection stop and fire it up and have fun.. I have many small forges and  they are all slightly different . 

Forge on and make beautiful things

Jim

 

Thanks for the reply. I'm not looking for perfection. I just wanted to know if this was the correct piece and if it wasn't would work as efficiently with it able to leak air from around the bottom. I will fire it up and see how it works.

 

1 hour ago, Stash said:

Actually, I believe that is a grate- the tuyere is the piping underneath. Anyway, that looks like it may be a repurposed grate from a floor drain. Take a grinder to it so it drops in the hole and fire it up.

Steve

Thanks for the replay. My bad on the name. I saw it named that on a site that sells blacksmith stuff so I thought it was correct. I too thought it was a replacement, but wasn't sure. As far as it being from a drain, I guess it could be, but like I mentioned the same exact piece is being sold as a tuyere on a blacksmith site. I did think of grinding it down but if it was original I would have felt like crap destroying it.  

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59 minutes ago, Charles R. Stevens said:

The lip may be for "claying" the forge. A layer of sand or ash will be good. This will provide some protection for the pan and tuyere. 

 

Good point. Thanks for the tip.

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I have also read that many old forges are rusted or corroded badly because they were subjected to rain which mixes with coal ash or dust and creates an acidic chemical (sulfuric acid I believe) which corrodes the forge.  A layer of clay may help protect the forge if it is subject to get wet.   

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one thing with claying is if their are any cracks than the water can seep through and corrode underneath the clay, and It also take a little longer to dry.

                                                                                   Littleblacksmith

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13 hours ago, arkie said:

Water and ashes create lye, which is very caustic (alkaline), not acidic.  Still corrodes, however.  Of course, rust is also formed which will eventually damage the forge.

When coal is burned the sulfur combines with oxygen and the sulfur oxides are released to the atmosphere. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) becomes sulfur trioxide (SO3) when reacting with oxygen in the air. This reacts with water molecules in the atmosphere to form sulfuric acid, a strong mineral acid. This makes rain acidic.

This is what I read.  I just had the details wrong, it's not from the ash...sorry.+

It is nice to try to help, but when you dont know yourself it is best to wait for those that to do know the answers rather than confuse the issues with wild guesses, as that only spreads misinformation.

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Thanks for all the replies. This will never be stored outside. The thought of it rotting away in a corner of my yard sickens me. I got it from a guy that found it in his great grandfathers barn so It has been out of the rain for most of its life. If claying will promote rot, then I will not do this. I am convinced that the tuyere grate is not original so I will gring it down flat and use it like that. 

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The grate shape is the same as my buffalo rivit forges.  Just as stated above.  The grate is flat on the bottom.  Have put many hours in a forge like that.  No clay.  You should look into getting 3 fire brick for it.  They help with making a deeper fire by using two for sides and one in back around your air inlet.  Then if you need a longer fire you can take the back one out.

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On 2016-05-16 at 9:33 PM, Worshipdrummer said:

I have also read that many old forges are rusted or corroded badly because they were subjected to rain which mixes with coal ash or dust and creates an acidic chemical (sulfuric acid I believe) which corrodes the forge.  A layer of clay may help protect the forge if it is subject to get wet.   

A high pH (lye) actually prevents rusting. This is why we can use unprotected steel rods in concrete. However with time, carbon dioxide from the air penetrates into the outer parts of the concrete and lowers the pH so reinforcement close to the surface may rust. The high pH of (wood) ashes comes from the potassium in the wood. Since potassium and sodium in coal is part of minerals that will form clinker rather than release the alkali metals in a way that will increase pH. I think that it is unusual that coal ashes wll create very high pH.

The sulfur indeed burns to dioxide later to form trioxide but this is hardly a problem in the forge since it disappears with the smoke. (It is a gas above ca -10°C) It can be a problem in the chimney if the temperature is so low that there is condensation since it will dissolve in water. I doubt that this can happen in a forge chimney but it is a problem in boiler smoke stacks if the boiler is too efficient.

The rusting of clayed forges is more mundane. We all know that steel in soil will rust unless it is very dry. Moist clay in a forge is no different. Moist clay=rust. dry= no rust.

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10 hours ago, gote said:

A high pH (lye) actually prevents rusting. This is why we can use unprotected steel rods in concrete. However with time, carbon dioxide from the air penetrates into the outer parts of the concrete and lowers the pH so reinforcement close to the surface may rust. The high pH of (wood) ashes comes from the potassium in the wood. Since potassium and sodium in coal is part of minerals that will form clinker rather than release the alkali metals in a way that will increase pH. I think that it is unusual that coal ashes wll create very high pH.

 

The residual in a coal fire consists mainly of both clinker and ash.  The residual ash + water = lye= caustic compound (high pH).  The clinker is usually removed and not a problem anyway (it's mostly silicates and other impurities bound together).

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3 hours ago, arkie said:

The residual in a coal fire consists mainly of both clinker and ash.  The residual ash + water = lye= caustic compound (high pH).  The clinker is usually removed and not a problem anyway (it's mostly silicates and other impurities bound together).

A high pH ash is not a problem since it will at least slow down rusting. It is low pH that is the problem. Ash from coal often contains Calciumoxide which does increases pH, Oxides of potassium and sodium which give the really high values are usuallv in small amounts.

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