Jump to content
I Forge Iron

Burners 101


Mikey98118

Recommended Posts

Most things have legitimate uses; plastic calipers are light and of no interest to thieves, making them quite handy to take along during visits to junk yards, etc. Alas, I must travel all the way to Tacoma to find a junk yard thees days; urban renewal sucks eggs.

 

and taking to places you wouldn't take better tools to? :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 2.8k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Mikey, I'm having a hard time picturing the butt-welded fitting you're describing. Is there any chance you have a picture or a link to these? Thanks!

Also, using a canning supplies in a burner build? That sounds like a one-way ticket to the doghouse if I ever heard one :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They're called "Weld fittings" or were anyway, it's been many years since I used any. They make nice pipe bumpers in all sorts of desirable shapes. A little grinding and the welds disappear for you. Provided you don't undercut beads. 

Frosty The Lucky.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Twigg,

Send me your email address, and I will send you a list from my notes. Seeing is believing, but we aren't allowed to list commercial sites on the forum.

Frosty is right. I would only add that, because mild steel butt-weld pipe reducers are expensive, you are miles ahead to use stainless-steel but-weld reducer fittings. since you will pay for it whether or not you get it...

I only use these alternative shapes when I am building too large a burner to use sausage ruffing tubes. Otherwise, they give the most bang for your bucks.

To be fair, we can name commercial sites, and talk about them. Just not list their addresses.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Goodness Mike, a quick web search and I'm thinking I'm going to have to borrow some tig time from a friend. 5ga, stainless butt weld fittings make a T burner easy. The bell reducers are smooth as a baby's butt, talk about induce swirl!

Slip weld fittings make mounting EZ. PZ.

Talk about a head slapping moment!

Frosty The Lucky.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

True, screw together fittings make what the T is, minimal tool and skill but effective. I can't help think about making a better one even it it requires specialized equipment. 

How well the ribbon worked just left me gob smacked. I knew it would work but holy moly!

Frosty The Lucky.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When one of you guys mounts a tiny push fan on the intake for a ribbon burner you well probably be gob smacked all over again, especially when you want to turn the gas pressure down in a hot forge without back firing? just a guess...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/15/2021 at 2:05 AM, Frosty said:

I've never had a use for his V blocks, joe blocks or most of the other instrumentation he loaded in the trailer that trip. I haven't turned my lathe on in a few years. I haven't had much use for it let along a couple totes full of high end instrumentation. I don't know if it's even worth much anymore.

That stuff is definitely worth money

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Frosty said:

I can't help think about making a better one even it it requires specialized equipment

I'd like to see an all out effort with no restrictions on tools or techniques. I'd be interested to see what you come up with. 

Pnut

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are lots of little tricks like that, which the older generation isn't passing on to the next one. Guess there's nothing new about this.

 

 Marking square cuts on pipe and tubing

How does a novice, who is short on tools, ensure that a tube or pipe is cut at true right angles? Roll a sheet of paper around the tube or pipe, making sure that its ends overlap exactly, and ink mark the cut line.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Mikey98118 said:

When one of you guys mounts a tiny push fan on the intake for a ribbon burner you well probably be gob smacked all over again, especially when you want to turn the gas pressure down in a hot forge without back firing? just a guess...

Probably not me, properly made a T burner doesn't need a booster. Or are you talking about enhanced swirl? Hmmm, that's a probability.

5 hours ago, pnut said:

I'd like to see an all out effort with no restrictions on tools or techniques.

Would you like to donate a Prybil metal spinning lathe to the effort? With a spinning lathe I can produce a linear burner on the same level as commercial units. Hmmm?

I have my Wrap Around in it's original box on the shelf in the shop Mike though the paper trick works on small pipe the Wrap Around won't. 

So, here's one for you, without special tools how would you mark 5 equally spaced holes in a round pipe? 

I'm not really trying too start a contest but if it appears there is one, some of the more . . . "modern?" folk might pick up useful old school tricks.

Frosty The Lucky.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Or how do you line up two pieces of pipe to be straight and in line with each other?

 

Another reason to be kind to a curmudgeon. (grin) They know the old school tricks.  

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Frosty said:

Probably not me, properly made a T burner doesn't need a booster. Or are you talking about enhanced swirl? Hmmm, that's a probability.

No swirl this time; just a little pressure boost, when back firing starts occurring in a very hot turned down forge.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've never noticed a single nozzle T back fire when turned down as far as it's stable. Below and they tend to go out, rarely with a pop. If you don't turn them off after they go out they sometimes relight and go into the pop on/off cycle or light like a torch with the flame at the air intakes. Okay, I suppose that's a back fire I don't count it as it's on purpose.

That's what started this branch of the conversation Glenn, last page.

Frosty The Lucky. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Frosty said:

So, here's one for you, without special tools how would you mark 5 equally spaced holes in a round pipe? 

Look up the circumference of the pipe, or just measure it with a tape measure, and divide the distance by five. Mark  three lines on a sheet of paper, with left over spaces at each end. Wrap the paper back on the pipe and transfer the five equal spaces.

The proper method; laying out a pentagon within a circle of the same circumference of the pipe would require a compass or set of dividers, which for this purpose would constitute "special tools."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wrap a piece of paper or string around the pipe and mark where they lap. Using the marks as ends, fold the paper/string 5 times. Wrap the paper/string around the pipe and mark every other one on the pipe including the lap mark of course. The pipe is marked at 5 evenly spaced points. 

You can survey a square corner with a string and stakes in a similar manner. Making a foundation square is silly easy. It is in fact how I checked the mason who did ours. 

Frosty The Lucky.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Glenn said:

Or how do you line up two pieces of pipe to be straight and in line with each other?

Run strings in a "X"  pattern, across one side the the pipes; when they meet, they are in a flat plane.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Frosty said:

Would you like to donate a Prybil metal spinning lathe to the effort? With a spinning lathe I can produce a linear burner on the same level as commercial units. Hmmm

I truly wish I was in a position where I could. I've seen a few metal lathes that were almost being given away due to the owner passing but the freight to Alaska would be out of my price range. If I can't fit it in a flat rate USPS box it's a no go:lol:

Pnut

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi all,

Newbie here. I don't have any questions to ask (yet)... I've been reading as much as I can absorb for several weeks now, and I'm just posting now to say how surprised and overjoyed I am to have just discovered that the two designers whose work I've been reading all about for the past several weeks, Michael Porter and the enigmatic Frosty of the "Frosty T," BOTH are active members on this forum!

Gentlemen, I've been reading about your work (Michael, er, ahem, Mikey, I've been reading your book, and Frosty, I've been listening to people debate your burner design endlessly) for weeks, and I'm sure hundreds of others have said this, but thank you so much for your contributions. I'm a complete newbie just getting started in the hobby, and your work has made it feel approachable and doable for me to actually get started.

I'm anticipating building my first forge this summer... but I still have a lot to learn in the mean time. But thanks to you and folks like you, the information I need is readily available.

Many thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...