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Weird thing that is, heights. Does funny things to some people, my Silat trainer has this weird thing that as soon as he get above a certain height he feels the need to poop...

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2 hours ago, Deimos said:

Weird thing that is, heights

I have a fear of heights until I get about sixty feet up. I have no problem jumping out of an airplane or abseiling down a cliff face. On an extension ladder or walk boards I get nervous. It's strange. I can force myself to keep moving but I'm definitely uncomfortable. Sweaty palms, shaky stomach, trembling extremities. I had to quit a few jobs over having to use ladders but had no problem dangling from a building cleaning windows in downtown Cincinnati. I don't get it. 

Pnut

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I have no problem with heights, or small spaces. But put me in a room and lock the door and something in my head just goes "no". Maybe something left from a previous life? For those that believe in those things.

 

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Phobias are weird critters. They're not rational. Back before I became a productive domesticated citizen I spent nine months locked in a room alone. It was a horrible experience so I can see how someone could fear it. 

Pnut

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I dont know if it is even fear that drives me then, I just create a new opening between the locked room and outside. Only happened 2 or 3 times now because people wanted to be "funny". Can be that my autism messes with my ability to notice fear or any other emotion.

The weirdest thing is that I have no problem with crawling into very tiny spaces.

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28 minutes ago, pnut said:

Back before I became a productive domesticated citizen

I liked the way you put that. Good luck was all that kept me out of that situation many times, when I was young, and even dumber than now.

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my grandfather used to call that "leven op kost en inwoning van de staat" which translates to "living accommodation and housing provided by the state" Almost sounds like a good thing then ;)

But same here, not being at the wrong place at the wrong time kept me just far enough from a life like that, someone must be looking out for me.

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We were speaking about safety issues, when cutting with right angle grinders. Half the problem is too much torque. The other half of the problem is overlarge cutting discs. you can buy a conversion chuck that allows 4-1/2” angle grinders to spin ¼” mandrels, and have the equivalent of a die grinder to work with. Suddenly all the accessories for die grinders will be open for your use, including 1-1/2” friction cutoff discs.A fan speed controller, or router speed controller can do a lot to reduce the torque, and conversion chucks (regular Jacobs keyed chucks that screw right onto 5/8-11threads found on 4-1/2” angle grinder spindles, or 19mm threads on 4" angle grinders) will allow you to mount 1/4" die grinder mandrels. You can then use an angle grinder to drill, sand, shape, and cut with much smaller accessories; they only cost about $11.56, because for drilling in steel, they are a bad idea. Angle grinders spin much to fast for drill bits to last long. But these chucks can cover your needs you can find them on line through Amazon.com and others.,

 

I accidentally bought the 10mm version for 4” angles grinders (type 100) with M10 x 1.25 spindles; it came today and runs smooth as silk. I am actually surprised how good the quality is. The other one is n transit :P

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I hope this is the proper place for this question. if it isn't plz move it and i apologize in advance thank ya 

i have a single burner box type forge, forced air and i have it hard piped in at 3/4 blk. pipe 

however i need to move the burner pipe   as it is getting a little to hot i have it to close to the top of the forge i think.

(of course after it has been used and good and dry) lol ugh 

the flex line was just a thought to not have to damage the inside coating of the forge by torqueing on the pipe with a wrench  if this makes sense  i will attach a picture soon 

 

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19 hours ago, Quitemanforge said:

 

ah ha here are the pics sorry didn't realize quite how to upload them 

 

IMG_20210304_092923750.jpg

IMG_20210304_092933802.jpg

the wool in the pic is not kaowool its some other kind i just had it laying up there while i was debating on weather to move the pipe or put in a heat shield of sorts 

Edited by Mod30
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Passing over the door is your problem.  The forge exhaust gases leave the forge, heat rises, and heats up your pipe.  Any chance you can get another partial turn on the elbow to rotate the fuel line to the side of the forge instead of passing over the door?  Hold the pipe attached to the forge and rotate the elbow, avoiding rotating the pipe attached to the forge.  

Looks like you'd have to cut the support arm off the forge as it's in the way.  

An unrelated piece of advice, if you replace that coupling with a union, you can disassemble this thing more easily for maintenance, moving, etc.  

How long is this plumbing?  Could you take a picture of the entire plumb system?  Too long and you start adding unneeded resistance which can lower output depending on your blower.  Flex line would give even worse problems with resistance.  

 

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Hi Quiteman,

Your pictures are all soft focus, so it is very hard to see much detail in them, to enable us to help much. ie. I cannot tell if the surface of your wool is coated or not!

Also they are enormous in size, which will raise comments, as many people who use this site do so over very limited bandwidth, and enormous photos and videos are heavily frowned-upon.

If you post up sharper, but smaller photos, with maybe a few close-ups, so we can see the details of your forge setup, then we are likely to be able to offer you better advice.

So some further questions for you:

1. Does the end of your burner pipe protrude into the forge, past the wool lining?  Normal Forge temperatures will melt/scale the end of a burner pipe in a very short time.  Best practice is to recess the end of your burner in the insulation layer (wool in your case), widen the area of the recess to make a flare (a region where the fuel/air mixture slows down so it can burn without blowing off the flame) and coat the inner surface of the flare and your forge with a refractory flame face such as Kast-o-lite30, for protection from the heat and dangerous particles of ceramic wool.

2. When you say it it is getting too hot, is this while running the forge, or after it is shut-down?  You can issues after you finish with your forge, where the burner pipe acts like a chimney, and all the heat from the forge rises up into your burner pipe, as it looks for a way out.  Some people with top-mounted burners close off the choke (air control valve/plate, etc.) after use to stop this from happening.

Give us some sharper, smaller piccys and we'll see how we can help.

Tink!

PS. Hiya Frank!

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All I see, that gives pause, is that the vertical section of pipe is much shorter than usual; this causes the horizontal section of pipe to be much closer to the heating forge top than it should be. This is an easy fix :rolleyes:

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Burner sizes

These burners are rated in “nominal” water pipe sizes, because most burners are built from pipe; this is always listed by smaller nominal sizes than their actual diameters, because long ago pipe’s outside diameters where standardized, so that parts from one manufacturer would fit another manufacturer’s fittings. But pipe walls in those days consisted of brass, which is far weaker than mild steel, so their outside diameters were oversize so that the pipes could carry their rated amount of liquid or gas, with the aid of thicker walls. Gradually, as material strength improved, their walls got thinner; so, pipe’s nominal diameters grew to be less than their actual inside and outside diameters. When burners are constructed from tubing, there sizes are called out as though they were still made of pipe, to keep confusion at a minimum (you gotta love the irony).

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So I have two 1/2in Frosty T burners that Frosty himself helped me with. I'm now trying to mount them in my forge and am wondering on placement measurements. About how far apart should I place them from each other? Also, how far into the forge should they go?

The interior dimensions of my forge are: 6"x4"x12"

Any guidance will be helpful.

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Divide the forge chamber evenly to space them. 12/3 = 4" so 4" from the ends puts them 4" apart. If you only have one opening then fudge the back burner a LITTLE bit forward but don't crowd the burners or they'll rob combustion air from each other.

Only insert the burner nozzles just past the shell and let the hole through the liner behave as a flare. This keeps your burner out of the forge's heat, first to prevent the burner getting hot enough to pre-ignite the fuel air and secondly it'll last longer before burning up. It WILL burn up eventually, that's one reason I prefer really cheap nozzles that just screw on.

Show us some pics as you go, we LOVE pics you know.:)

Frosty The Lucky.

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Concerning torch tips

The major use of burners--nearly the entire use for blacksmiths--is to be mounted in heating equipment, But, a truly hot air/fuel  burner also makes an economical hand torch. We normally consider each burner part in relation to its performance in a forge, or with a few of us, also in a casting furnace. Thus, most of us only consider flame retention nozzle design in that context.

    But, for those of us with a fascination with burner design itself, We are missing something HUGE. It is obvious that running a burner out in ambient air quires better nozzles. It is plainly seen that better nozzles also improve burner performance within heating equipment...and we think no farther, because super-heated equipment atmospheres also limit

what tricks flame retention nozzles can play; this is not so in ambient air, and small hot  air/fuel burners make excellent hand torches. Hand torches open up the need for a whole gallery of special flame retention nozzles...shall we call them torch tips? :rolleyes:

Are my fellow Frankenstein types listening?

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High-speed burners all produce turbulent flame. How turbulent depends on the design. And some designs may appear closer to desired flame types than others; this is true, and relevant; but not decisive. All flames can be considered as a working force; just waiting to be manipulated.
    One of the factors used to safeguard peak flame velocity is the length of a burner’s mixing tube. No matter what the design, lengthening that tube beyond the best length for peak performance will soften the flame, and can be used as a factor in manipulation. Nor is it necessary to start with an overlong mixing tube, as that addition can easily be included in specialty tips.

 

As to the tip shapes, present propane torch-heads on the market have listed the type of flame produced as “brush flames” from torch-heads devoted to the biggest heat output; “pencil” flames from torch-heads that are mainly used for brazing; and rarely as “needle ”flames on expensive propane torches that come with individual flame tips, although needle flames are quite common on butane torches.

 

“Brush” flames are the easy type to produce on any high-speed burner. If you have already built a few slide-over stepped nozzles, and had trouble exactly matching up spacer rings with the outer flame tube, you will have found that, so long as the two parts are centered and axially true with each other, a twenty-thousandths of an inch gap between them makes no practical difference.

    But, if you take this gap to extremes, say a 1/4” gap, lengthen your “floating” nozzle, and omit the spacer ring; instead using six longer set screws, your flame retention nozzle can still be tuned as before, by changing the amount it overhangs the mixing tube, but the flame is now bushier and much larger.

“Pencil” flames is a meaningless term, as used by OEMs; it just means narrower than some “other” torch’s flame, are narrower than some other tips flame if they sell more than one for their product. Let us define it as longer, narrower, and calmer than the flame your burner usually creates. So any pencil flame tip must start with an additional length to the mixing tube built in to its design. The latest method used to create pencil flames in the stainless-steel flame tubes now found on dual fuel (propane and propylene) being sold as brazing torches, use a bull nose shaped opening at the end of the flame tube. So, you should probably look into peening the end of your flame retention nozzle over, to narrow the opening about 20% smaller, and then smoothing out the orifice with a rotary tool.

 

Needle” flames are the hardest to achieve with propane fuel. At least one English propane torch can achieve them; it is not only expensive but quite heavy; a real burden in the hand. This is as far as I’ve got, aside from looking to the design of butane fueled blue-flame lighters as my model.

 

Gentleman; start your engines  :D

 

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Thanks for the info Mikey! When you say a bull-nose shaped opening, do you mean the rim of the nozzle is thicker than the wall behind it?

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