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Some coolness at the Kamloops Gunshow. REALLY should have bought them both.... but $300 was a bit more than I had for spending money. First is a Finnish hewing axe (guy had it labeled as English as that's where he had gotten it from) The other is a Goosewing hewing axe. ohhh! did it feel good in the hand. One table had a Massai spearhead about 2' long, should have grabbed a pic of it and more Ruger #1's in calibers I'd love to have than I seen at a show yet.

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Edited by Dogsoldat
typo
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Wow that second picture one has been re-worked a bunch of times!

Not quite like my Great Great Great Great Grandfathers Axe that we still have and are still using to this day----we're replaced the handle 16 times and the head 5 times....

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Would this Finnish hewing axe be an example of wrapping a high carbon bit over the edge of the blade instead of Imbedding it? Thomas has mentioned that option many times, but I've never actually seen done before.

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1 hour ago, Robakyo said:

...an example of wrapping a high carbon bit over the edge of the blade...

There's another example of this as a modern practice in this film of an axe factory in Maine in 1965; the fitting and welding of the bit starts at 3:51.

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I noticed that in the video that there grinders were going the opposite direction than most bench grinders (the sparks were flying up). anyone know why?

                                                                                                               Littleblacksmith

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On 4/28/2016 at 4:14 PM, littleblacksmith said:

I noticed that in the video that there grinders were going the opposite direction than most bench grinders (the sparks were flying up). anyone know why?

                                                                                                               Littleblacksmith

Depends on a number of factors: How you were trained, what size and type wheel you're using, in some cases safety, culture as well.

Wet wheels often turn "up" so water is carried from a bath under the wheel more directly to the contact surface. Turning upwards carries debris up and away from you where turning downward shoots it at your waist and legs. If an edge grabs the wheel the blade can be thrown directly into yourself.

Wheels turning "upwards" tend to be much larger and turning more slowly, it's the surface speed of the wheel that counts not RPM. RPM is just a number you use to calculate surface speed.

Frosty The Lucky.

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