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Anyang power hammer questions from beginner

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Hi all, I’m sorry for what are probably very stupid questions, but this is my first power hammer and I’m a little confused on a few points. 

So after a lot of help and advice from very nice people on this site I bought a used C-41-15 Anyang hammer connected via a VFD to a single phase system (will be all hooked up by a professional electrician on Monday). 

The hammer however has been slightly modified and I wanted to check a few points. 

First the Hammer control seems to have been connected to the foot pedal in such a way that the idle run, top set and light auto settings are impossible to use (below). The silver handle will not go any higher as it it is stopped by the bar connecting it to the foot pedal. Is this normal? The manual says that the hammer should always be started in its highest position but thats not possible now. Also does this mean the hammer can now not be held in the top position? 

The hammer was also supplied with 2 c shaped bits of flat metal, what are these for? You can also see the dies are in a diagonal position, can they be repositioned so I can feed work in from the front?

The lubrication system does not seem to match the manual, I understand from the seller that it was modified to fix inherent problems in the earlier models. I assume that I still just fill it up until Its half full on the round indicator, or should it be full? Can it be overfilled? The manual talks about excess oil accumulating in the sump that must be drained. How will I know when to do this? Can the oil be reused?  

The electrical doing the work has asked for an electrical diagram that shows him how to connect it. I have checked the manual supplied and there is nothing like that in it. Is there somewhere I could get the information? 

Sorry again for all the questions!

 

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Did the seller explain how he used to use the hammer and what to expect from it.? And I would also ask about the C pieces, they could be for all sorts of things related to how the machine is used or maybe even they don't belong with the machine

There are others who are a lot more familiar with this make of hammer and no doubt will respond favourably to your queries.

Based on that just a couple of statements from myself . The dies are angled so you can pass long workpieces between them, place them square on and you are limited by the throat depth to the lengths you can draw out.

The ram may withdraw to the highest position when the machine is started, the tup usually is supported by a wooden block or similar when not in use, when the machine is switched off, gravity takes over and the tup will descend onto the bottom die.

Speculating, the silver handle may move more for selection when the machine is working, I understand they need to be warmed up and well run in to get optimum performance.

I hope others can be more informative on the matter for you, 

Have fun and enjoy, and remember to use on metal that is really hot to be effective. 

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I fill my oil pump to the top. You cannot overfill it. It leaks xxxxxxx unfortunately and does not really work all that well. The sump overflow pipe appears to be in place on your machine but to what it is attached is unclear from the picture. I use the oil repeatedly. The dies are correctly positioned and should remain so. Removal of the cover, above the pipe will reveal the sump and also the grease zerk points. Apart from the odd idiosyncracy. a perfectly good, reliable machine.

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John Nicholson of Massey Hammers used to import these into the UK and was responsible for the improvements to the oiling system. I am not sure if anyone has taken the agency over, but if he cannot help with any queries he would know who you could contact.

There have been a number of threads on here by both John and others about Anyangs... do a few searches to winkle them out.

I have a C shaped box section device which hangs off the top of the cylinder head and holds up the tup for maintenance and tool changing. It also serves to keep the tup ram surface up in the cylinder so it is not vulnerable to spark and grinding grit spray from the angle grinder. I am not sure whether that is what yours was made for, the legs look a bit short...but if not you should make one, they are a good thing to have anyway. A block of the appropriate height upon which the top tool can rest will also serve to keep the bearing surfaces of the tup and cylinder sealed from grinding dust.

The tools at 45˚ allow you to either draw out or spread the full length of the bar when you are using a pair of cheese fuller tools like the ones in your photographs. Set at right angles you would be limited to by the throat of the hammer. At 45˚ you are only limited by the wall behind the hammer...and you can always either pull the hammer forward or cut a hole in the wall...

I use a slightly tighter radius pair of cheese fullers on my 50kg Reiter hammer for virtually everything I have ever done on it. With the addition of a drop on 175mm square 12mm mild steel table mounted on a 25mm thick walled socket which locates on the bottom tool and rests simultaneously on the sow block and the top of the bottom tool, you have an extremely versatile system which allows for offset shoulders tapering and spreading.

Enjoy it and good luck with it.

Alan

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On 17 April 2016 at 4:33 PM, Alan Evans said:

I have a C shaped box section device which hangs off the top of the cylinder head and holds up the tup for maintenance and tool changing. It also serves to keep the tup ram surface up in the cylinder so it is not vulnerable to spark and grinding grit spray from the angle grinder. I am not sure whether that is what yours was made for, the legs look a bit short...but if not you should make one, they are a good thing to have anyway. A block of the appropriate height upon which the top tool can rest will also serve to keep the bearing surfaces of the tup and cylinder sealed from grinding dust.

 

That is a good point about keeping the the tup ram surface clean, I will have to make something that does that job.

I just discovered that the c shaped metal sections are to anchor the base down, it had not occurred to me that such a large bit of kit could move! 

On 16 April 2016 at 10:17 PM, kevano said:

I fill my oil pump to the top. You cannot overfill it. It leaks like hell unfortunately and does not really work all that well. The sump overflow pipe appears to be in place on your machine but to what it is attached is unclear from the picture. I use the oil repeatedly. The dies are correctly positioned and should remain so. Removal of the cover, above the pipe will reveal the sump and also the grease zerk points. Apart from the odd idiosyncracy. a perfectly good, reliable machine.

The pipe is just loose, do you need to filter the oil before re-use? A little searching on google leads me to believe that grease zerk points are small apertures through which grease is forced. Would I then need a grease gun as all I have done is slap grease on any part that looked like it moved. 

From what you guys have said and what I can find online, the lube system works by drawing up the oil from the reservoir through the two pipes. I think the two nuts on the front regulate oil speed but what does the lever and the two taps do?

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Grease zerks are what you and I know as grease nipples. So yes, you do need a grease gun.

Have you contacted John Nicholoson yet? You would probably be able to buy a copy of the manual from him...if you can't trace back the ownership to the last guy that held on to it. If John cannot supply one maybe the agent in the 'states can help.

Alan

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I would not reuse the oil.  Oil is cheap compared to a scored cylinder from some grit that might make its way out of your sump.

As far as oiling, you pump the handle until you see the first drop or two in the sight windows, then when its running you adjust the needle valves so that you see a drop every 6-10 seconds being pulled in.  Again, oil is cheap and hammers expensive so don't be stingy with the oil.

You do want to grease the bearings, but not too much.  A couples of strokes on the grease pump is all you need.  The manual says every 3 months of use for the grease so you can adjust that to the amount of work you do.

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The lever is a pump used to push oil to the top of the cylinder prior to turning on the machine at the beginning of each new shift. The factory recommends about 20  or so tugs of the lever. You will need a grease gun with a flexible spout as one or two of the grease nipples are somewhat awkwardly accessible. I will see if I can locate my manual and if so make some plan to get a reproduction to you.

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Its a 25 kg hammer, not a 15kg.

Your electrician can't be much cop if he cant put 3 phases and an earth to a motor.

If you have just bought the vfd, and the hammer has not run from it before (ie, it was on 400v 3 phase before) you will need to swap the bars over in the terminal box so the motor will run on 200v 3 phase.

You can start the hammer in 'top setting' if you want, it will just pull an extra couple of amps. i vaguely recall that Tim modified the hammer so the 'tup at idle' position could be adjusted (so it 'tups' a bit when idleing).

Easiest thing is to give me a bell again, and I will talk you through it all.

Massey are selling the hammers again in the UK and Ireland. I am better at hammers than advertising though...........

The pin on the top valve boss is a modification that I made to some hammers, It stops the valve travelling to 'clamp' position, which it does by default (ie, it travels past neutral into clamp)

This 'default to clamp' can lead to problems when the hammer is left 'clamping' not in neutral. The clamp function is pretty well useless on small self contained hammers so I disabled it. If you put an ammeter on the motor you will see that the valve is arrested in the lowest current draw position by that pin.

The 5/16" copper pipework was a pita to do, think it looks neat though :)

 

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I have had it all connected now but am having problems with the VFD settings. I tried to copy the settings on nonjic's video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=_l0Qh5seBlI

 

but all i get is a horrible high pitched whine, what am i doing wrong?

 

ph vid.m4v

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I have a VFD on my Anyang C41 (88 lb) but my VFD is a different brand/model from yours, or at least looks different.  I watched my electrician program it.  You really need to know what you are doing.  The (at least mine) VFD's are computers and have many settings.  My VFD was made by Schneider Electric and I d/l a 90 something page manual from their website.  I suggest you try to obtain a detailed programming manual and get someone knowledgeable to program it.  It must be set correctly to work properly.

Good luck

James

 

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I just spent the last hour reading a VFD manual for something else and it does sound like there are many ways to screw it up.  Manufacturers often have customer support people who can help  you with the handful of settings that really matter for your application.  A phone call to the support line might be a good use of time.  The whine on motor drives can be caused by a drive signal that isn't the right sequence and amplituded needed to cause any movement but just vibrates the windings.  You don't want to do that because you're putting power into the motor without it turning the fan to cool off.  You may also damage your VFD.

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Regarding the die positioning; I have repositioned mine to the opposite diagonal for specific projects.  Usually I can get my work done without having to move them.  You certainly wouldn't want them facing directly frontward!  Then you'd have only a few inches of space to work... before your workpiece jammed against the back of the throat!

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On 5/23/2016 at 6:37 AM, JAllcorn said:

I have a VFD on my Anyang C41 (88 lb) but my VFD is a different brand/model from yours, or at least looks different.  I watched my electrician program it.  You really need to know what you are doing.  The (at least mine) VFD's are computers and have many settings.  My VFD was made by Schneider Electric and I d/l a 90 something page manual from their website.  I suggest you try to obtain a detailed programming manual and get someone knowledgeable to program it.  It must be set correctly to work properly.

Good luck

James

 

Why use a VFD?  Are you trying to slow down the flywheel?  If so, please post again to let us know how it's working.  Residentially, where I live, we don't get charged for electricity based on peak amps (just on total energy), so I can't see why you would use a VFD unless you were trying to slow it down.  Maybe use it for speed control on a grinder instead?

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I think the VFD was required for making the three phase motor on the hammer run off single phase. Just like the grinders where they have a three phase motor (specifically for need of speed control) but operate them on single phase. I wonder too if he did get it sorted out.

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On 1/3/2017 at 4:24 PM, AdamG said:

Why use a VFD?  Are you trying to slow down the flywheel?  If so, please post again to let us know how it's working.  Residentially, where I live, we don't get charged for electricity based on peak amps (just on total energy), so I can't see why you would use a VFD unless you were trying to slow it down.  Maybe use it for speed control on a grinder instead?

I was trying to lower the input amps and prevent "spiking" of the electric meter.  I'm on  a "demand" meter (you can research demand meters) and my usage is billed on a combo KWH used and demand factor.

Slowing the speed is an option w/ VFD.  I did this a time or two just to see if I could and how well it worked.  My electrician friend advised that if I was going to lower motor speed via VFD, that I needed to monitor motor temp, and if necessary, put a fan to blow directly over the motor.  My 2 cents on this is that lowering motor speed wasn't really something I liked or needed.

Demand would not be an issue in a larger facility where numerous machines are being used simultaneously or in a residential location where there is no demand meter (in my opinion).

The VFD did work to some extent and it lowered my demand factor and electric bill as a result.

However, I finally got enough of the elect co, the demand meter, etc. etc. and I sold the Anyang 88 hammer, replacing it w/ a  Big Blu 155.  All that to say, the Anyang is a FINE hammer.  I never had a minute's problem w/ it.  I am also happy w/ the Blu.  There are some differences and idiosyncrasies w/ each. 

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I would love an Anyang.  I just got my Kinyon style hammer going but my skills are rough, so the hammer is too!  Nice to have something that hits harder than me for a change; I had the valve plumbed so that air was trapped in the 'up' side of the chamber and never hit worth a xxxx.  Now it hits hard enough to make me worry about my welds!

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