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I Forge Iron

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from left to right: Auto body, standard ballpeen, tin knocker's hammer; tinner's hammer, etc.  Two on the right are fine for smithing work but will profit from having their faces dressed.  The "sharp" crosspeen will be good for texturing leaves for example.

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The one on the right is a sheet metal forming hammer, a "creaser" I believe, straight and cross pein. The center one is a ball pein and the one on the right is too far out of frame for a good ID. What I can see is a plannishing face.

The ball pein is a blacksmith's hammer great size for riveting and light work though light for general forging. The formimg hammer is of limited use smithing though a boy can never have too many hammers.

Do you have things like flea markets, swap meets, yard, garage (boot?) sales, etc.? Hit them regularly with a few bucks in your pocket you can pick up hammers for a LOT less than $5.00, I pass if they want more than $1.00 and am really looking for ones with broken handles, they go for less than $0.50 I bundle if possible. Slab handles are much better for forging IMNSHO.

Argh! Thomas AGAIN :P.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Thanks Frosty! They're few and far between where I live in NZ. I've been scouring all the second hand shops on the Manawatu. What on earth is a slab handle by the way?

20 minutes ago, Frosty said:

The one on the right is a sheet metal forming hammer, a "creaser" I believe, straight and cross pein. The center one is a ball pein and the one on the right is too far out of frame for a good ID. What I can see is a plannishing face.

The ball pein is a blacksmith's hammer great size for riveting and light work though light for general forging. The formimg hammer is of limited use smithing though a boy can never have too many hammers.

Do you have things like flea markets, swap meets, yard, garage (boot?) sales, etc.? Hit them regularly with a few bucks in your pocket you can pick up hammers for a LOT less than $5.00, I pass if they want more than $1.00 and am really looking for ones with broken handles, they go for less than $0.50 I bundle if possible. Slab handles are much better for forging IMNSHO.

Argh! Thomas AGAIN :P.

Frosty The Lucky.

 

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A slab handle is one made from a piece of hard wood board, I use straight grain clear cabinet quality 5/4" hickory. Originally I adapted a cross between Uri Hofi' hammer handles and one a friend up here uses. I taper them wider from the head to the end to keep from throwing my hammers when I get too lose on the grip. The handle is flat like a board and it makes it very easy to index in your hand so you always know exactly how it's tipped side to side. Being flat it's easy to hold onto and allow to pivot between my thumb and index finger so I can strike harder with less effort.

 The one on the vise used to be a $0.50 garage sale ball pein on a broken handle, now it's a reforged straight pein on my slab handle. The one on the deck rail is one Metalmangler helped me make from a piece of broken Ford pickup truck axle, Mark's pickup unfortunately. Now its a about a 32oz turning hammer on a slab handle. There isn't much taper to the handle but it's so much easier to hold it's flat amazing. It's a fine day's work when after 5-6 hrs of hard hammering your hand isn't tired and hasn't suffered impact shock.

Frosty The Lucky.

5704bbf3dd443_Balltostraightpein01.jpg.a   Hammer2Wh.thumb.jpg.59a1c88b62c0efbffe5b

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The one far right is known to me as a boiler scalling hammer. Given many hammers have different uses to different trades, you takes your choice. Personnally it's what I use it for regardless of what it was intended for. I think I would round the edges of and use it as a straight/cross pien, all depends what else you have in your collection.

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I am assuming the change in surface from edge of the shaft depicted the taper down to the straight pein, but I see your point Thomas, that may not be the case and we could indeed be looking at a square face edge on. In which case I can come up with another half a dozen or so alternate names and uses......lol

 

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1 hour ago, ThomasPowers said:

There may be an issue with the picture of the right hand hammer: if it has a flat square face it's a tinner's hammer if the face goes down to an edge it's a scaling hammer I cant tell from the shot.

kind of wonder about the face my self.   I looks a great deal like the Stanley brand hammers issued to Bell Telephone repair men (They were all men in those days).  They were Riveting hammers.   The flat face tapered from the square body to a round flat face. I occurs to me that in those days Bell system may have bought tinner's  hammers from Stanley and had their name stamped on them. My copy is in my tool box as I type.  Hammer head is 11 cm long 2 cm deep 2.4 cm thick weight of head and handle is 1.1 lb

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I have a couple of the old linesman Bell System hammers; My Father, my Uncle, my Sister (summers during college) and I (almost 15 years in Bell Labs) worked for AT&T so when I saw the old "Bell System" hammers at the fleamarket I had to pick them up--the ones with the through hole for turning the pegs on the telephone poles.

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