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Austin Ferraiuolo

Damascus pistol grips

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Any Damascus with good contrast or mokume Gane which is basically nonferous Damascus

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I think that would be a cool idea, and would look awesome, I want a set for my 1911! if you make a set and it works out let me know!

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Only problem might be rust, from all of the contact with sweaty hands. Would have to find a rust/tarnish proof finish.

                                                                                             Littleblacksmith 

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Some folks don't have that issue. The gunsmith loved the fact that I could handle bare steel and not cause rusting like the other guys. It is just routine maintenance to give it a wipedown after a trip to the range. If it is a carry gun it could be an issue from sweat. Whatever you use to protect it has to be dry, and not slippery.

Hot blue would help the steel, and the nickel can fend for itself.

 

 

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To answer the original question, I'd use 15n20 and 108X (1080, 1085, etc).  Stack up about 12 layers, forge weld them together, and then twist the billet several times.  For higher layer counts, prior to twisting, you could cut the billet into equal lengths, stack them up, forge weld together, and then draw out and twist...

To make the grips, use the existing grips as a pattern, and then get busy with the grinder, files, sand paper, and drill...

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I recall reading a review of a super custom 1911 with stainless steel grips polished to a mirror finish.  Everything was going swimmingly until they went downrange to change targets and left the pistol on the bench.  By the time they got back, the sun had heated the grips enough that the poor bloke nearly branded himself!

It would be a crying shame for somebody to drop such beautiful work because it got too hot to handle.

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At least it was still there when he got back. Besides, burning yourself a second time is a good sign to your buddies you may NOT be smart enough to handle fire arms.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Not gun related, but a friend of mine once sat for a long time in a sauna leaning forward with his cross hanging out from his body and sloooooowly heating up. When he leaned back against the wall, it landed on his chest and gave him such a bad burn that he got a cross-shaped scar branded between his pecs.

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back to subject that is a nice looking gun, sweat/rust might be a problem but someone must have a product to stop it esp. if a daily carry gun.  Range gun not so much with a good wipe down before putting away like we all do.

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I have absolutly no clue how to make it but there are damascus rings all over and i believe they are using stainless and titanium, that would fix the rust issue.

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13 minutes ago, T.J.watts said:

I have absolutly no clue how to make it but there are damascus rings all over and i believe they are using stainless and titanium, that would fix the rust issue.

Yes there are and there is even more Mokume Gane jewelry. There's a pretty valid argument that pattern welding and mokume are the same thing. Diffusion welding to be specific.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Damascus grips may be nice for a show piece. But I think it's not a good choice for any practical purpose gun - carry or sport. Rust and maintenance where mentioned. Also consider the added weight - which is uncomfortable by itself, AND it's in the wrong location, not helping sight stability or muzzle control.

In cold weather, metal will bite a bare hand.

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That said, 18th century Scottish flint lock pistols were made with all metal stocks.

"By hammer and hand all arts do stand."

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