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3 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

Steve; best for rifled guns; I don't think it's as important for smoothbores, (I have a 2" smoothbore falconette). I used to have a print shop behind my house and when they shut down they were tossing linotype in the dumpsters the idjits!

Probably correct. I've never really gotten in to smoothbores, so I've never researched it. Sure do love my smoke poles though, especially the 1851 "Josey Wales" gun and the 1860 Army. 

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About the rifle "made" on Iron and Fire. All I saw him do was a little hardware, trigger guard, and bedding the stock. I would have a much different view of the program is it showed even a couple minutes of him forging the barrel.

Am I being too harsh?

Frosty The Lucky.

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4 hours ago, Frosty said:

turning out to be a dog and pony show spouting Hollywood

In that case someone needs to tell them their dog won't track and the pony has Heaves!  Sending the guys down to buy the cable was so fake they should be ashamed of them selves is this what the FB site is like?  I stopped recording the show after the first one. 

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47 minutes ago, Frosty said:

About the rifle "made" on Iron and Fire. All I saw him do was a little hardware, trigger guard, and bedding the stock. I would have a much different view of the program is it showed even a couple minutes of him forging the barrel.

Am I being too harsh?

Frosty The Lucky.

Not at all! I was thinking primarily of the shaping and finishing of the stock, which was definitely not off-the-rack. I agree about the barrel, though.

4 hours ago, Frosty said:

I don't think we'd have much pull as blacksmiths, too many folk with a hammer and anvil are dying for their 15 minutes and a paycheck.

Not me: I get my paycheck elsewhere!

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the History channel recruiting post has been going to all smithing sites on face book too....

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3 minutes ago, Steve Sells said:

the History channel recruiting post has been going to all smithing sites on face book too....

Hmmm...maybe they could do a series about a short-tempered production smith who lives north of Philadelphia....

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Wouldn't you know it I did stumble on a feedback email address. and below is a cut and paste of the email I sent them. I don't expect it to do any good but what the hey I get to vet a little.

Frosty the ticked off.

[email protected]'


About “Iron and Fire”. Your model for injecting contrived drama and ignorant mythology is making a mockery of the History channel already. Your production values for Iron and Fire is no better, from the foolish shopping trip antics to the blatantly false words put into the “blacksmith’s” mouth have the blacksmith community world wide switching channels.

For example, blacksmithing not only is NOT a dying art, there are more blacksmiths practicing today than ever before in history. One online blacksmithing forum has more than 40,000 blacksmiths registered as members and it’s not the only site online.

Another point against the program is noise to signal ratio. for every minute showing genuine blacksmithing there are may times as many showing foolish xxxxxxxx like shooting melons WITHOUT PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT!!! Talk about doing the public a disservice, you in your foolish desire to sell whatever crap your marketing guys are selling are putting people in danger. Too many people out there THINK you’re telling them the truth rather than soap opera quality crap.

Yeah, I’m a blacksmith and received a query about doing the program. Like so many other Alaskans have regarding invitations to participate in your version of reality didn’t even reply.  

How about actually doing something historically accurate for a change?

With all due respect, Jerry Frost

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My own email:

"To whom it may concern,

"As an amateur blacksmith, I was interested and intrigued when you announced your new show "Iron & Fire". Having seen the initial preview and the two or three episodes aired so far, I must confess that you have disappointed me horribly.

"First of all, blacksmithing is NOT a dying art. Over the last half century, blacksmithing and its close cousin bladesmithing have enjoyed a tremendous revival, and smiths of every skill level and degree of professional commitment are preserving old techniques and developing new ones to create objects of utility and beauty. Tens -- even hundreds -- of thousands of smiths around the world have dedicated themselves to sharing their knowledge with each other and with anyone who shows an interest in exploring this ancient art. If your research department had spent any time in the blacksmithing community rather than apparently limiting themselves to a single self-absorbed smith in the Ozarks, they would have known this immediately.

"Second, if all the extraneous and useless material were stripped from your show -- all the contrived drama of the hillbilly friend who wants to cheat the show's lead out of the price of lunch, all the slow shots of Ozark countrysides and rural living, all the slow-motion footage of an overly-smoky forge, all the main character's semi-coherent blathering on about lost arts and secret formulas (all of which, by the way, are readily available on the internet) -- there is precious little footage of actual smithing. Five minutes of your other show "Forged in Fire" (a show which has improved consistently since its inception) show more skill, more technique, more drama, and more artistry than two full episodes of "Iron & Fire". A word of advice: slow motion shots of exploding melons get real old, real fast.

"Third, the complete absence of any protective gear -- whether for smithing or for shooting -- is reprehensible. If the goal of this show is to get people interested in actual smithing, you will bear the moral responsibility for the first teenager who loses an eye to a spray of sparks from hitting overheated steel. I don't know who your legal people are, but if they didn't warn you to put a "do not attempt" disclaimer in the opening credits, fire them and hire someone competent. And then start showing responsible behavior in your show. You can do it. It's not that hard, and it's the right thing to do.

"I doubt very much that this email will make any difference to you. Chances are good that the show isn't going to last more than a season or two at the most anyway. Still, as someone who cares both about smithing and about quality television, I felt obligated to offer you a few words of criticism and advice. 

"Yours sincerely,
"[JHCC], amateur blacksmith"

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40 minutes ago, John McPherson said:

From Gallagher, the comedian: "There is a knob on the TV for brightness, but it does not work like it should."

Thank you for a laugh John! This topic REALLY needs some good humor.

Frosty The Lucky.

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I admit, I like watching shows like this and screaming "What the **** at the tv when they do or say something silly." It's bad tv. Oh well.

(also read casting the One Ring whilst talking about forging it in the fires of Mordor, and Valyrian steel, and while we're on GoT, mix and matching armor styles from about a dozen different periods, often on the same person), hitting cold steel in the cowboy flicks, quenching for no reason to add drama, London pattern anvils in Roman or viking flicks...)

Also, I thought he said he was deliberately trying to pit it, in order to falsely age it? Was he using muriatic? I just assumed it was hot vinegar, but wasn't watching close. Makes sense it was something stronger though if it was pitted.

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I'll keep watching I&F at least for a while. Maybe the intend of the show is to make FIF look better! Ah HAH I knew there was a plan!

I don't expect anything approaching accuracy from movies or TV but the History Channel is supposed to be EDUCATIONAL! Look around, do we REALLY need to teach stupid?

ARGHHH! I gotta go back and reread John's Gallagher post. . . Ahhhhh, that's much better. Thanks again John.

Frosty The Lucky.

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44 minutes ago, Frosty said:

Look around, do we REALLY need to teach stupid?

 

Frosty The Lucky.

LOL all they have to do is quit moderating and correcting bad ideas and misinformation on here like alot of other sites. Bam! teaching stupid. ooh, and let the beginners with no experience tell the beginners how it's done! hehe 

Ahh. the people and experience that makes this site great.  a big old Thank You... :) 

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41-Ss3p8hqL.jpg

Burt Reynolds as Quint Asper, the half-white, half-Comanche blacksmith on "Gunsmoke" — a role he played from 1962-1965 on the long-running TV Western.

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Well, you know, ... it's TV.  :rolleyes:

And it's best if you remember that TV was created specifically to sell you things.

Not to entertain, ... And certainly not to educate.

Sure, it would be great if it were authentic, accurate, factual and all that, ... but it's not.

 

But that didn't stop you from laughing, when the Anvil landed on Wile E. Coyotes head, ... or Bugs Bunny outwitted Elmer Fudd, ... again.

And in this case, as well, I think it's essential to ... Consider the Source.

 

.

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The anvil falling on Wile E. Coyote is still the most realistic depiction of blacksmithing equipment on TV ever.

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Never dropped one on my head before. I've found dropping them on fingers and toes to vary slightly from the cartoons.

It's a shame we don't have anyone that could tell us what it's like to have a heavy weight dropped on you unexpectedly from above to compare...(doesn't look at Frosty, doesn't look at Frosty, doesn't look at Frosty...)

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An old friend of mine was hammering a big spike into a plank and smacked his thumb directly against the board. I could see his thumb smoosh our around the hammer head just like Wile E's head. Took nearly a year for Bill to grow his thumbnail back. Just shortly after I'd clipped the last bit for him He did exactly the same thing and yo bet, his thumb smooshed out just like before but it took more than a year to grow his thumbnail back this time.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Realistic Blacksmithing in a Movie - Smoothbore, in response to your question, check out the opening sequence of the Russell Crowe film (1993) "Hammers Over the Anvil." The camera view is primarily shot at about the height of the of the anvil face, and follows a farrier making a horseshoe from bar stock.

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I just saw the "quenching north" thing again.. I almost have a hard time believing Hershel told him that but then again Hershel is very old skool' too.. It made my stomach hurt..

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6 hours ago, KYBOY said:

I just saw the "quenching north" thing again.. I almost have a hard time believing Hershel told him that but then again Hershel is very old skool' too.. It made my stomach hurt..

Well, it could, just COULD be an old skool curmudgeon messin with TV producers too. Hmmm?

What little actual smithing I saw looked competent even if there was a lot of oogga boogga Bull . . . spit being talked. Last night's new episode had virtually zero smithin in it maybe we just don't know what the show's about.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Smithing is a pretty intimidating field certainly for the first few years.   The Fire & Iron fellar really chats himself up incessantly which might not be as encouraging as others.   I've not seen him make a barrel yet so I'm real curious if he's "John Brown" or John "Villa" of the forge world

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It's important to remember, that shameless self-promotion has always been with us, ... and therefore, can also be considered "traditional".  :unsure:

 

.

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3 hours ago, SmoothBore said:

It's important to remember, that shameless self-promotion has always been with us, ... and therefore, can also be considered "traditional".  :unsure:

 

.

You're not saying his forge isn't the only thing on the program blowing smoke are you?! :o

Deleted rant about an ex associate. A bad, really B-A-D experience probably just soured me on anybody trying to mystify any craft to self "promote".

Frosty The Lucky.

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