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Hello, I am brand new to smithing and I am excited to start the craft. I have a makeshift forge and i am in the process of building a anvil stand. (Pics of the forge below) I am looking for any tips/tricks that you guys/girls would be wiling to provide. I will post update pictures as I progress. 

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The picture is a little confusing. It looks like a top view of a cast iron stove. Is that what it is?

I don't think it's suitable . You need to do a little research on how to build a simple forge, Either on Google or here on Iforgeiron.com  .

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6 hours ago, dickb said:

The picture is a little confusing. It looks like a top view of a cast iron stove. Is that what it is?

I don't think it's suitable . You need to do a little research on how to build a simple forge, Either on Google or here on Iforgeiron.com  .

It is the top view of a cast iron stove, I planned on using the grate as a platform for my coals then have a blower underneath.

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Welcome to the forum Newbie. For the amount of work  involved in converting the stove into a forge, you'd be better off building any of the simple forges described on these boards. The stove would make a great........stove! It's a good idea to put your location in your profile then those local to you may offer assistance along the way.

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As said above check out some of the threads on simple forges,there are plenty of ways to make them just takes a little scrounging.welcome to the craft

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I've got a couple of them, here I thought they were used for heating, well guess I'll will advertise them on e-bay as antique forges in the rough!  Make lots of $$$.

All kidding aside I think  what the others above have said is correct don't take your time on something in all likely hood will not pan out  and get yourself a brake rotor or brake drum off a pickup and make it out of that, there are all sorts of Pics. on here for those.  You tube has a hundred videos showing how it's been done.  No need to reinvent the wheel. 

 

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****update*****

Here is the anvil stand I made, I plan on reinforcing the legs and I left room for a vise on the other side. The face of the anvil is just about at my knuckles which j read is a good height. (That is not me in the picture). As far the forge goes, I have already put sometime into it so I am going to test it out and see how it goes. I will post pictures of the first fire in the forge. 

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Edited by TheNewbieForger

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***update***

Started the first fire and started to smith a little, the forge worked fine just have to get used to the whole craft, I am going to be buying some rebar to forge with to get used to it.

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I replied to your other post but forgot one more thing. Forget BUYING rebar it's too inconsistent because of rather casual melting at the plant. Buy proper steel, I recommend for the first buy either 3/8" sq. or 1/2" rd. hot rolled mild steel. These two sizes and shapes are close enough to the same weight per linear measurement as to make them the same size in a different shape.

When you're learning a new craft you really want to take it one thing at a time so using consistent predictable steel takes at least two different skills out of the mix Once you learn the basics of blacksmithing to a proficient level then learning to recognize the working characteristics of different steels is just one more skill set you already know how to forge. Same goes for bladesmithing learn to blacksmith THEN learning to forge blades is just learning a new steel and how to heat treat.

Set yourself up for success, you'll learn faster and learn to be a better blacksmith as well. Win win. My purpose for these suggestions is the same as in my other post. I'm not picking on you, I'd really rather see you spending your time learning to blacksmith instead of trying to figure out how to get anything to work. Oh keep looking for a good anvil, that's a cast iron imitation anvil commonly known as an ASO (Anvil Shaped Object). It'll do for now but you really want to keep your eyes open for a good one.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Lots of really good stuff on the forum about improvised anvils, almost any of which will do you better service than the blue blob.

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Thanks guys I really appreciate the feedback, I am using a pair of channel locks right now to hold my stuff. Do you recommend me looking into buying a pair of tongs or making my own? And as far as hammers, I'm using a 4 lb right now, should I be using lighter ones or what?

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Probably yes. I suggest you get a lighter one and see how it feels and how your work comes out Compare it to the four pound hammer. I'd go for about a three pound cross pein hammer .  

Also suggest make your own, The more things you forge, the better you will get at it, They may come out like they have a severe case of rickets, but you will learn from your mistakes. The next one will  better. You can Google "Dempsey twist tongs" .  They are easier to make than more conventional ones.

They're pretty inexpensive at Harbor Freight, but check them over carefully. Sometimes the handles are loose.

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Might I add, Viking hammers were in the 1 1/2-2# range, I have found that 1-1/2, 2, 2-1/2,3 and 4 pounds are a good range, but start at the lower end, tractor supply Job Force cross peins in 2-1/2# are a good start as they take less dressing than others (the pein is way to pointy on most)

I shoe horses in my day job, I have both a 1-1/2 and 2# hammer on the truck, learn hammer control before going bigger, I use 3# hammers for general forging, and the 4# (and accasinaly a 14#) to get big stuff started 

Unless you are building an armorers stake bench your stand is wrong for an anvil, a stump, steel tripod or a barel full of dirt will work better. Nice bench tho, keep it and use it for a stake bench.

As to a forge, as you have proved to be a good wood worker, build 2 or 2-1/2' box out of 8" stock anvil high (no sense lifting stock from the fire to the anvil, and you can rest long stock on the anvil) stick a pipe in the side of the box (3/4" schedual 40 black pipe) 3" off the bottom) fill the box with dirt and dig a hole down to the tuyere (pipe) pot a bell reducer on the end that fits the hair drier and walla (you might have to leave a gap between the hair drier and the pipe, as you may have to much air) you have a side blast forge

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Using that stove as a forge will end up destroying it and you could sell it and buy a lot of tools with the money as it is...

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23 minutes ago, ThomasPowers said:

Using that stove as a forge will end up destroying it and you could sell it and buy a lot of tools with the money as it is...

The guy I bought it from had it on Craigslist for about a year and dropped the price multiple times.

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Still not as good a forge as a hole in the ground.  I'd be happy to sell you one of those but the shipping will cost!

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2 hours ago, ThomasPowers said:

Still not as good a forge as a hole in the ground.  I'd be happy to sell you one of those but the shipping will cost!

You could swap him Thomas that way he'd only have to pay shipping.  :lol:

Frosty The Lucky.

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Right now I do not have the material or money to make a new forge and a hold in the ground is out of the question since out backyard is mostly gravel with a liner underneath. So for the time being I'll have to use the oven, It seemed to work fine it was getting the railroad spike white hot so for now it will have to work. And the anvil I can already tell is a p.o.s so I will be on the lookout for a new one.

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If you can keep the fire ball down to about 6" across it will saves lot of fuel, an you really can't hand forge much more than 6" at a time. 

Atleast pull the center stove lid support and fill your stove with dirt.

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37 minutes ago, Charles R. Stevens said:

If you can keep the fire ball down to about 6" across it will saves lot of fuel, an you really can't hand forge much more than 6" at a time. 

Atleast pull the center stove lid support and fill your stove with dirt.

So are you saying take out the center one and fill it from there back with dirt? Or the bottom portion of it? (where I am blowing the hair drier in) Cause there is a rack in there that you can turn to drop ashes down into the lower part, and that is where I had the coals sitting, that way I could get the airflow going up through the coals. Also little side question, is A 36 steel fine to forge with? 

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Honestly I would just fill it to the top with dirt, after installing a tuyere, a bullet grate from the bottom or a side blast if you plan to use charcoal. This will preserve the wash heater (the type of wood stove you have) and provide you with a much more effecent fire.

many of us use A36, but it can be incosistant like rebar. 

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Fill it with dirt and poke a piece of pipe in from one end. Scoop out enough dirt to make a depression or trench that exposes the pipe about 1" from the bottom for wood, charcoal. Or what Charles a couple inches for coal?

Don't overthink these things, an old wheel barrow, Radio Flyer wagon, wash tub, etc. all make excellent forges.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Same for coal, but avoid clay soils as the slag sticks bad.

if you use a peice of 3/4" pipe, place the pipe 3" deap (top of pipe) 

with charcoal the hot spot will be at table level, with coal, it will be an inch above the table.

with a bottom blast the opposet it true. 

Lot simpler to snag a line pallet or two and build a box with legs

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Just googled Dempsey Twisted Tongs on youtube.  As a beginner you have no idea how glad I am that I found this forum. I don't think that a day goes by that I don't learn something new fdrom the people on this forum. Thanks Bud:D:D

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