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Vaughn, The kerf would only be a consideration per the length of stock, say 20 feet. The kerf could then be made up in the forging process as both ends were forged in this case.

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11 hours ago, Glenn said:

You folks are thinking cut ends that end up being heated and forged. If that is the case there is no reason to cut the ends. They can be sheared, ox/ac cut. plasma cut etc. In fact they can be cut double length and not need tongs. Once both the pig tails and loop are formed, THEN hot cut it in half and form the top of the hook while the metal is still hot.

Doing production work it can be very important to have consistent lengths of stock.  This can be done by shearing the blanks, flame cut, plasma or laser cut  ahead or even by having a jig or measuring tool to hot cut them.  But often sawing is the best way to get consistent lengths. If you are forging the part a lot changing the lengths changes the volume of the part which can change later stages.  With the OP's parts cutting them in half with a hot cut is an extra step that might cost him a hook per hour and to get consistent parts he will have to measure to do that cut.  The saw cutting is likely only costing pennies per cut on small parts like that.

There are times where cutting a blank in half  hot is useful to preform the end of the stock to a shape that is helpful for a later stage.  I hot cut a slug in half using a scissor tool  forming a steep cone when forging a cone.  This prevents me having to chase a birdsmouth.  on the end of the bar.  A retired  industrial blacksmith I know told me when forgingsomething like a cross peen hammer to make 2 at a time and then cut them apart at the peen.  The 2 peens are then mostly shaped by cutting them in half.

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wow.   I like hooks.   Not sure I could do 20+ per hour.  yet...    But at $7 each or whatever I could make some decent money, daily, in an hour or so++, when I eventually retire...   I could see myself making 500 hooks per month.   At $7 ea.   Thats $3500.   Heck I could start now.    Just need a buyer????   

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Buyers, that's the detail that took me ten years to develop.   Counting while I was smithing for other smiths, 14 years.

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yeah.  I get it Boggs.   I still have this pesky day job at the oil refinery so have plenty to do anyway.  Plus in Turnaround now so double extra pesky and 4x more to do.

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There's also a LOT more to the equations than just time and selling price. There are some long and intensely informative posts on this very subject. Seriously truly excellent posts by professionals.

Frosty The Lucky.

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I love finding/figuringout/learning of a set up cut that makes the next step easier.  Like doing the hammers in pairs, and scissor cutting at the piens.  (I really like doing crosspein/straight pein combos, or a right and as left diagonal pein...) Or cutting the spring to the center and forging out the slitter for the "tools to make tools" style hammer eye slitter/punch.  Scissor cutting blanks helps start your tapers, and can start your leaf shape, or prepare the blank for an acorn or ball end spring die.  Or even cutting off to prepare for a scarf for welding...

But I will admit I get MUCH more consistent sizes of my finished products if I start with precisely cut blanks.  Sometimes that matters, and sometimes easing the process and getting something that looks really nice is what your after

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