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So I found this old and really beatup anvil at work a few months ago so have gotten into smithing, nothing fancy just a couple of railroad spike knives and a pair of arm guards so far. But I feel like improving my workplace since I can't really make any smooth bends with these edges and it just bugs me the way it's been treated.

Very deep grindmarks on the square horn and a minor one on the round one, chippings along the entire edge on both sides and in the hardy hole.
On the plus side the face is flat and even without irregularities and it got really good bounce over all.

Is it worth repairing this old wreck or should I look into getting a better one?
 

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Welcome aboard Benne, glad to have you. If you'll put your general location in the header you might be surprised how many of the IFI gang live within visiting distance.

NO, you do NOT want to try "restoring" that anvil. First it's actually in fine shape the chips knocked off the edges on the tail aren't bad enough to risk ruining the anvil trying to repair. Just radius the edge at the face to prevent further chipping and that part's fine.

The grind marks aren't anything to worry about either nor is the torch cut at the end of the horn.

The little bit of chipping on the edges is inconsequential, they're the result of missed blows and easy to work around. You only need good edges to set shoulders and by GOOD I don't mean sharp square, I mean radiused. A sharp edge WILL put cold shuts in shoulders making an initiation point for failure. Meaning the work will break at sharp inside corners.

Were That fine old lady to fall into my shop I'd just put her to work unless I found a crack traveling or a dead spot I'd use her as she is. The kind of repair necessary to correct the large chips on the tail WILL put the heat treat at serious risk and I KNOW what I'm doing.

Just use it for a few years. Once you develop proficient skills sets you will begin to develop the kind of experience you need to even know if that old beauty needs repairs. Till then you're more likely to ruin it. Seriously, more anvils have been ruined by good welders and machinists than actually "fixed."

Please PLEASE don't try "restoring" that anvil.

Frosty The Lucky.

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They are not damaged areas, they are "additional features" you just need to learn how to use them :D

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There's not much wrong with that anvil. It will do you many more railway spike knives and more! As Smoggy said - work with what you have!

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If you feel that you need an edge that is not represented on your anvil make a hardy tool with it, in fact with care you can make a hardy tool that will give you four different edges to work against.  Also for bending you could use a set of hardy hole mounted bending forks.

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Thank you all for the fast replies. 
I see now that it looks worse than it is for my unexperienced eyes.
I will round of the edges abit for more consistency atleast.
The hardy is chipped mostley the first few millimeters then it's just surface rust so I think I cound just make tools for it with a wide head so it wont get stuck. So far I've used the round hole since we have pieces of roundstock that fits that perfectly.

Scrambler82 : It's a 90kg NOHAB, sais 18 on one the other side to if that helps identification.. From what I understand they are quite rare.

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What have you NOT been able to make with the anvil in it's current condition?

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7 hours ago, Glenn said:

What have you NOT been able to make with the anvil in it's current condition?

It's not what I haven't been able to do just that it bugged me how it looked and if it would be a problem down the line as I progress my work. But since people says it's fine I feel relived.

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Benne: An anvil's main function isn't to look good though I do understand how a craftsman doesn't like using tools that look like they've been abused. Some of that damage is normal wear and tear, the small chips on the main edges is in that category. My Soderfors has chipped edges. The big chips on the tail are from someone using a sledge on it and if you get a chance slapping them around would be forgivable.

The torch cut REALLY ticks me off, even on a junk cast iron ASO it's unforgivable abuse. Unfortunately it's pretty common abuse.

Still they aren't serious damage to it's utility. Believe me nobody who matters is going to think you as the blacksmith took a torch to his anvil. If someone asks just tell them it you rescued it from people who'd do that to a fine tool.

I'd LOVE to have that beauty in my shop though I wouldn't trade my 125lb. Soderfors for it. Wouldn't even think about it I love that anvil, heck I'd have it's babies. :)

Frosty The Lucky.

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If you wanted to dress the edges to a series of stepped diameter curves it would then be considered an asset and impress people with your anvil use mods.

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Took some more pictures for you guys. Smoothed the edges just a bit and made a stand for it the other day.

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Benne, anvil looks good now get to using it.  As for your stand you might want to put some feet on it.  

Frosty, let me know when the litter arrives.  If you are getting rid of some.  Or will the offspring be like your own kid and you won t sell any.  

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1 hour ago, matto said:

Benne, anvil looks good now get to using it.  As for your stand you might want to put some feet on it.  

Yeah I know it's still a work in progress. Just got exited now that I have people to talk to about smithing.
Feet is a given and might add some rings along the edge for tool holding. It's a snug fit so I had to force it into place but will add some bars over the feet to secure it just in case.

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Nice to see a north Swedish anvil among all London pattern. The square horn looks very blunt to me. Does it show signs of being cut off?

Hardy hole tools should rest on the surface of the anvil. The hole is for location only so you are fine. I like the shank to be a snug fit and not conical so I use a piece of square tube. I drive it hot into the hole so it deforms to the hole shape then weld it on..  

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A tripod is a MUCH more stable stand especially for an anvil. The load is top heavy and you're going to be putting a LOT of force into it. Nice job dressing the anvil's edges, she's just begging to be put to work now.

I'll give you a call as soon as the litter's weened Matto.

Frosty The Lucky.

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I'm with frosty on a tripod stand.  They are so stable.  If you are putting feet on and bolting it to the floor no worries.  One main bennifit of a tripod is it will stay stable on multiple surfaces.  

Frosty sounds good.  Dibs on the runt of the litter.  I was a runt and turned out good so I tend to go for them.

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NIce anvil / find. I wouldnt worry about the big chip at the back of the anvil...In fact i would ask the guys if it would hurt to grind in a 1/2" - 3/4"  Radius on the back edge. you never know this might be handy?

My buddy has one of the pallet changers set into the floor like you've got in the photo....Awesome table...Awesome anvil!

Frosty...Don't dock their tails. LOL

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Thank you all for the usefull advice. As suggested changed it to a tripod stand and welded on some threaded rods with bolts and brackets to clamp it down. Also went over the whole thing with a wirebrush and some 800 grit sandpaper and got a clearer image of the brand.

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Nykvist och Holm Aktiebolag  = Nykvist & Holm Ltd. Later known as part of Bofors 

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Now weld connect the legs to each other so you don't have an accident.

Where are all these beautiful nordic anvils coming from?

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what's the width of the face? that narrow pattern double horn looks very interesting. If I would ever make an anvil, I would make something somehow similar. it would be also easier to make than other patterns

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I'd be more comfortable using it if the legs were heavier though spreaders between them as Arftist suggests would do. 90kg is a nice shop anvil I'd put her to work as she stands.

Frosty The Lucky.

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