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I Forge Iron
harry robinette

Forge coke coal? What to line with

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I'm a noob I have an 18"  rivet forge with Champion Blower. What do I fill and shape the forge with. Been told         to use the puddy stuff and also told to use soft brick. I don't know what to do.

I'm getting ready to use this in the spring have smithy almost done. Still need to put up the inside sheeting and an exhaust for the forge.

Thanks in advance 

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A lot of guys don't line their rivet forges at all and they have good arguments for the choice. If the pan says "clay before using" the manufacturer is recommending a layer of clay to disperse the heat to the pan. Cast iron doesn't like high temperature differentials, intense heat from burning coal in one relatively spot and the rest of the pan being ambient qualifies.

A mix of 2-3 pts. sand to 1 pt. clay dampened till it clumps in a tight fist is fine. Spread it and ram it hard with a mallet, end of a 2"x4", etc. scoop out a depression to expose the air grate and you have what  was recommended by the manufacturer. A basic for of "duck's nest".

To customize fires on a duck's nest simply arrange bricks around the air grate. If you're burning coal you can lay them flat and let the coal dome above the bricks. with a little practice you can place the sweet spot about even with the brick tops using air control. Charcoal needs a deeper fire so you stand the brick on edge and use less air.

To work any fire effectively you need practice and must observe the effect of every change. Only changing one thing at a time lets you keep track of what does what changing more than one and it turns into a crap shoot. Okay if you're lucky, otherwise not so.

Frosty The Lucky.

 

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The clay soil in Summit County will do well; just cut it with some sand.

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3 hours ago, JHCC said:

The clay soil in Summit County will do well; just cut it with some sand.

I didn't figure he'd have to import clay to Ohio. Just garden, ditch, field, etc. variety, nothing fancy you only need a shovel and bucket.

Frosty The Lucky.

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When I lived in Ohio I dug my clay from a local creek in Columbus.  I'd mix it with wood ashes to get a tougher mix and then keep the forge DRY; not hard as the sewell seam coal I bought at Quad-State didn't need water to coke it!

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I use two champion steel rivet forges and there is nothing but steel and coal.  Not sure why anyone would desire to line it with something. I did have to make new grates where air passes up into fire and made them about 8" across. That is what the fire sets on. 1/4 " steel plate. 

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A  plate of mild steel 1/4 inch thick with the air holes cut. I guess it's called tuyere holes. This has provided many years of satisfactory use in a "all day fire (9 hours of use) many times over.

Can't argue with results. No clay required.

Champion 145-18inch Forge 140 Eureka Blower Completed 003.jpg

my forge 2.JPG

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