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The forge is done..

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Nice looking forge.  You're gonna need a heavier counterweight for your ash dump to keep it closed.  Might tack weld an arm and heavy weight on the "ear", long enough so that you can dump by just leaning over to work it.  Come to think of it, no more than the flapper weighs, just a long arm of something like 1/2" rod/bar would probably work without any more weight.

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I like it. Very nice work. Just finished clawing mine. Any thoughts?  Still have to build the rolling cart for it.

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I like the suggestion on a mouse hole. You guys think a small hole or slots on both sides. Thinking towards slots. Any experienced member'since advice is appreciated.

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So very much work for so limited a forge. <sigh> Semi brake drums are of very limited uses other than stopping a truck.

That's not "clawing" Earnie it's "Claying" meaning to ram clay into a thing. In the case of these extremely impractical and practically useless semi drum fire pots the clay is to make them small enough to be useful.

You guys would all be better off with a wooden box full of clay.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Thanks frosty. This is my beginner set up to get started. Had one already. Do you think cutting slots in both sides is better than holes for longer stock.  Oops on the spelling, phone uses the auto correct.

How would set up the box you suggested 

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I liked clawing!   Very picturesque...   Slots will help.  You may want a fence to keep coal or charcoal from overflowing onto the table and thence onto the ground 

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I wasn't clear? I wouldn't use a semi brake drum for much of anything except: stopping trucks, elevated fire pits, buried ground anchors and Smoothbore just mentioned bells. I haven't tried a bell so maybe.

Get or make a box say 12" wide x 24" long x 8+ deep. Decide if you want a bottom or side blast. Lay a piece of iron pipe in the bottom from one end either 3-4" above the bottom or almost touching the bottom.

A sideblast tuyere lays near the bottom of a trench just off the bottom and barely exposed. The air is supplied through the pipe, you replace the pipe as it burns up.

A bottom blast is more problematical but you're going to be a blacksmith. The real problem is clearing the ash from the air supply. I like running a supply from one end to a T fitting and another line to the far end and capping it. A close nipple on the T to a perforated cap is your air grate. Hook the blower to the supply end and you're good to go. Clearing the ash is as easy as removing the cap from the cleanout end if it's really bad ram it clean with a piece of rod.

I know I didn't say anything about forming the fire pot. It's damp clay make it whatever shape you need. For coal I like a "duck's nest" a shallow depression, say 1" +/- deep and maybe 3-4" around in a nice flat deck so I can stack bricks to shape the fire how I want. A side blast seems to like blowing into a trench but you can use a duck's nest just as well and it's just as versatile.

Charles has just recently posted pics of his wood box side blast forge. It's a perfect model.

Frosty The Lucky.

11 minutes ago, ThomasPowers said:

I liked clawing!   Very picturesque...   Slots will help.  You may want a fence to keep coal or charcoal from overflowing onto the table and thence onto the ground 

Clawing clay . . . Uh, isn't that a little catty Thomas? I have to admit clawing a forge does make for good visuals.

Frosty The Lucky.

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For pete's sake will you guys stop using "semi brake drum" and "bell" in the same sentence! I tried it and posted with pic not too long ago. Both types are much quieter than I would ever have imagined and useless as bells. This even with carefully suspending the drum with less contact area than I've seen on vintage cast iron bells. So, what makes vintage cast iron bells work?

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