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These two photos are the first with the four walls up. Been collecting pallets from a Sherwin Williams paint store for about a year now. I ALWAYS asked permission before hauling them home. I used lag bolts to bolt them together in the best pattern I could to get walls approximately the same height. The dimensions came out to 10' x 7' x 10.4' x 8'. So rhomboidal but hey its four walls. The smooth wall in the second picture is covered in some disassembled crates I traded for two years ago. The roof will have to wait until after Christmas but at least the walls are up and I can start doing small things in the mean time. My only cost so far has been less than $50 in screws of various size from deck screws to Lag bolts. 

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I like the idea of using salvaged materials, that's how I built both my shops, but I don't know about what you have. You didn't mention any kind of structure other than pallets so I have to ask, how are you planning on supporting a roof? I also have to ask, what kind of roof you're gonna put on it with it that out of square? I build and remodel houses for a living and we never even attempt to put a roof on if the walls are that far out. If it's just an inch out that's one thing but three inches is a bit much.

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I'm with Mike, I love the idea of using available (free) materials, but I'd be concerned about fire codes, housing codes, xxxxxxx the neighbors off, etc.  You could still use the same materials, but break down the pallets, use the pieces to build a proper structure.  You've got plenty of lumber there to do framing, sheath it, all in a way that would make it last and not xxxx off any of a number of local people/government entities that would have a problem with it.  If you were out in a rural area, might be a different tale (though I'd still worry about structural integrity), but it appears from the photo that you have neighbors nearby. 

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Never have got my head around how pallet walls are framed, tho most I see have the 2x stringers vertical. How do have yours built? 

In the past "california framming" worked (1"x 12" plankes vertical) so their is realy no reason 1x4" vertical wont work

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Start asking around about hail damaged propanel roofing, makes good walls too and is a bit more neighbor/spouse friendly  Much more wind resistant too as Winter Is Coming!

You are in a classic pole barn area; my local electric co-op used to give used power poles to it's members free and that's how I did the uprights on my 20x30 shop---2 40' power poles cut into 4 20' poles sunk 5' in the ground and then used purlins between them to put the scrounged roofing on---really 2 15' bents as it attached to my previous shop as an extension.

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I understand everyone's apprehension of the frame. The pallets were lag bolted together Then attached to 4x4 posts at the corners. The ironic thing about the city codes is that if I build a "permanent" building I have to follow some strict codes (since the Joplin tornado of '11) A temporary building is not covered under code. When I have some money to put on the roof, a 2x4 will be put across every wall and screwed in to the wall and the 4x4 posts. 2x4s will be used for a roof support. Plywood sheet and then probably tin sheet. I have the plywood already. Cement board for under tile work will be put up in the forge corner to lessen chance of fire. This all being built this way because I dont have 2k for a shed or even 500 for the lumber to build my own. 

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Wow for some reason I keep thinking "Guy Fawkes" 

but then I remember back when I was 14 and built a sorta lean too for my push bikes 

probably looked like that but I have fonder memories of it 

please keep us posted would like to see it finished and some nice work coming out of it 

fergy

Edited by fergy
Speeling

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I don't see this as a Cheapskate Shop just what you can do at the moment shop.  In another time and another area of the world I saw whole families living in places like this and "happy" to have them.   On a Canadian Fly in Fishing trip we found the outhouse built in this fashion, kept the smell down they even skipped the door!  What ever works is great.   

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Im gonna make a suggestion on how to afford the lumber. Around here building supply companies once a month will sell returned lumber and lumber that's got a bad crown or twist in it for much less than full price. I'm not talking about places like lowes and Home Depot (but they might idk) I'm talkin about the companies supplyin lumber to home builders. Another option would be to ride around looking for a house that's bein remodeled and talk to whoever is in charge to see if you can get some of the old lumber. Like I said in my first post, that's how I got my shops built. It was old studs, ceiling joists, plywood, and even a functional overhead garage door from a couple houses that were being remodeled. I got the tin roof off an old feed barn that was being torn down. 

As far as building code goes, I'd really suggest even on a 'temporary' building that you follow code. It would be bad if someone got hurt as a result of you not following code and you found yourself in a lawsuit for negligence or worse.

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lots of temporary structures don't meet building codes. carports, woodsheds, chicken coops, cellars, deer blinds, pumphouses, etc. if you have kids around just put a fence around it and not worry about it.

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Trailer manufacturers like PACE sell the shorts from the plywood they use in the trailers. Before the closed the shop in S.Utah they would sell them for 25¢, and they were good sized sheets.

I used 55 gallon drums welded together for the walls of my smithy. I cannot post pics with the new software, but I'll see if I can find an old post with a pic to link to. I ended up with self standing walls 3' thick, 8' tall, and 10' long. The open ends on one side allow me to store tools, and material in the horizontal drums. Also with my forklift I can move them anywhere I need to. As for stability, they have withstood 50 MPH  winds without any issues data all. It rarely rains here, so I never bothered with a roof. I can buy the old vinyl billboard wraps, and they last for years, and years in the desert sun, so I may get another one for shade in the summer instead of just forging at night.

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Well.........

Do yourself and everybody else a favor and be ever vigilant and uber paranoid about fire.

Your photos alone look like a big bonfire just waiting for the match:o

George

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These are some further pics of the shop. I am using Wonderboard (concrete panels) as a fire retardant in the corner where the forge will be.  (Second pic.)

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Possible thought as well that I had seen recently was an animal shelter much like yours.  but only 1 pallet high all the way around and then a hog fencing panel arched over the top with a tarp over top of that.  the fencing panels are only $20  or so.

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A decent and cheap fire retardant is to dissolve borax in water and spray the wood. It won't be fire proof but it'll be harder to light.

Frosty The Lucky.

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Man, I have about 50 pallets in my back yard I had been thinking about using to build something just like this lol. Waiting for the time and some extra cash to get the other stuff. Looks good!

On 4/16/2016 at 3:47 PM, Frosty said:

A decent and cheap fire retardant is to dissolve borax in water and spray the wood. It won't be fire proof but it'll be harder to light.

Frosty The Lucky.

What ratio would you say it is?

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As much as will desolve, thus a "saturated solution" best if you make it 3 parts borax (20 mule team) and 2 parts boric acid (roach proof) more neutral ph. If you delute it with antifreeze (low/non toxic or the old kind) you have tried and true marine rot preventer. 

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Another angle inside. And to Ridgeway, I am planning on closing in those eaves soon but putting in a drawing fan on NE corner. With?l let you know soon. Starting a fire tomorrow. 

 

 

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On 11/24/2015 at 8:34 AM, notownkid said:

  In another time and another area of the world I saw whole families living in places like this and "happy" to have them. 

Like this? A family lives here, very nice folks. On the bright side they are right on the beach.

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